A Doll's House

A Doll's House

PEnglish 102-5
March 29, 2011
A Doll’s House
Nora is the main character all throughout the first act of A Doll House. She has several different qualities that both work together and against one another to build up her character in this play. The two most prominent are her as a child, and as both a manipulator and one who has been manipulated. Nora is seen as a “doll” or child throughout this play. She is treated this way because of the way she “acts”. She will clap her hands when she gets excited about something, and is often humming and moving all around. Nora’s character can be controversial. Nora’s attitude toward her husband Torvald Helmer is very young as well. Torvald had always treated her this way because he regarded for her as a squirrel, which demonstrates that he does not believe her capable of dealing with adult matters such as finances and health crises. Instead of treating her as a wife or adult, Torvald lectures her on posturing, child rearing, and even dancing. By the end of the story, when he is hit with the knowledge of Nora’s complicated efforts—to save his life, he chooses to take aim and talk at her, rather than discussing her reasoning and emotional state when she made the choice she did by getting a secret loan.
Throughout the play I felt that she couldn’t take care of herself without her husband by her side. I didn’t really know what to think of Nora at the beginning of the play. Nora’s “hidden” strength is shown the most toward her husband. She is determined to do whatever it takes to save his life. Nora loves her husband and makes many sacrifices throughout the play. Most people wouldn’t have the courage to do some of the things she did. I think her strength and courage, though hidden, led me to realize her real image.                                                                                                                  
Marriage today is far more complex. In the 1950s and earlier, roles for men and women were clearly...

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