Assassination of Lincoln- Theories

Assassination of Lincoln- Theories

Theories of Lincoln’s Assassination
There are numerous theories about Abraham Lincoln’s assassination. One of the theories is the Simple conspiracy theory, which states that John Wilkes Booth and his small band of co-conspirators planned to kidnap Abraham Lincoln. John Wilkes Booth was considered as a racist and a Southern patriot. Ulysses G. Grant, General of Union’s army suspended the exchange of southern prisoners of war, which led Booth to plan to abduct the President. Booth was considered as the leader of this small group of co-conspirators that included Samuel Arnold, George Atzerodt, David Herold, Michael O'Laughlen, Lewis Powell, John Surratt, and Mary Surratt. The reason behind this plot was that it would have enabled the South to rise up and have a chance for victory in the Civil War. Booth’s and his co-conspirators’ plot was to kidnap Abraham Lincoln, take him to Richmond, and exchange him with Southern prisoners of war. However, when the plan failed, Booth took revenge and began another plot of assassinating Lincoln. Booth also wanted to assassinate the Vice President, Andrew Johnson and the Secretary of State, William H. Seward. Assassinating the top three, powerful figures, Booth knew it would have given a major blow to the government of the United States. Therefore, Booth assigned Lewis Powell to kill William H. Seward and George Atzerodt to kill Andrew Johnson. George Atzerodt backed down and Lewis Powell attacked and injured Seward critically but he was not able to kill him, which failed Booth’s plan again. Booth however, shot Abraham Lincoln on April 14, 1865. John Wilkes Booth and all of his remaining co-conspirators, except for John Surratt were either hanged or sent to prison in Fort Jefferson. Booth considered himself as a hero throughout this entire plot. In his diary, John Wilkes Booth considered himself as Brutus and Lincoln as a tyrant, Julius Caesar. Booth thought that he should be praised for killing Abraham Lincoln just as Brutus was...

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