Casey Anthony Trial

Casey Anthony Trial

Chad Muhlbauer #462436
Legal @ Social Environment of Business
Heidi Noonan-Day  
Section 03
Casey Anthony Trial
For the past three years, people have tuned-in to television, radio, newspapers, and the internet to hear the latest news on the famous Casey Anthony trial.   During June and July of 2011, there wasn't a TV station that didn't have coverage on it.   It was a case many mothers and fathers could relate to because it dealt with the everlasting love between a parent and their child; or so they thought.   In this paper I'm going to talk about why the jury found Casey innocent of first degree murder and what is wrong with the American Justice System that allows guilty people like her walk free.   How far does reasonable doubt go?   Also, I want to talk about why the case hit so close to home for many people that followed along with the case, and what needs to be done regarding child abuse laws in Florida.
First off, let us get the facts of the case straight.   Casey Anthony waited 31 days to report her two-year-old daughter Caylee missing, in the summer of 2008.   At first she told authorities that her nanny had kidnapped her, then went back on her word and said later in the trial process that she drowned in her parents swimming pool.   Casey also lied to police about having a job and made up stories about future plans she had with her daughter.   Testimonies and video footage also showed Casey out shopping, drinking, and hanging with friends during the time Caylee was “missing”.   Friends said she never looked “worried, depressed, or angry” after Caylee went missing[1].   What kind of mother could do this?  
During the investigation, examiners found a hair consistent with Caylee's, in the back of Casey's car trunk.   The trunk also smelled like “there had been a dead body in the car,” which Casey's mother testified[2].   A professional scientist with 20 years of experience verified that the smell was, “the unmistakable odor of human decomposition.”[3]   Dead flies...

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