Coca-Cola: the Better Company

Coca-Cola: the Better Company

Coca-Cola: The Better Company
Coca-Cola is mostly known for its classic commercials.   The purpose of the commercials is to persuade consumers to buy their product.   According to the Jib Fowles article, “Advertising’s Fifteen Basic Appeals” the commercials associated with the company uses the need for affiliation in order to grab the consumer’s attention.   The need for affiliation is depicted through the friendship, sharing and togetherness between groups of people or between two individuals.   The commercial titled “Hard Times” is about greedy millionaire Mr. Burns, from the Simpson’s television show, and his sudden misfortune.   The viewer hears a news caster happily reporting on Burns’ financial crisis.   Following the report music plays as we see every material thing owned by burns is being taken away, even his loyal assistant.   Distraught and miserable, Burns watches as the mansion is being lifted away by a bunch of helicopters.   In the next scene Burns is walking down the park’s pathway where he sees the other residents of Springfield playing, laughing and enjoying their cokes.   One of the residents, Apu, sees the depressed man while carrying his bottles of coke and offers him one of his extra bottles.   Giving Apu a small smile, Burns drinks the beverage.   Afterwards a visually happier Burns is then welcomed into the fun by the other residents.   The end scene continues skyward where there is a picture of a Coca-Cola bottle.   On the side of the bottle it says “open happiness” as the music turns into a whistled version of the classic Coca-Cola tune.   This commercial consists of two parts of affiliation, the negative and the positive.   At first Burns was ostracized by the whole community because of his recent misfortune but after he accepted and drunk the Coke, the Springfield residents accepted him into their happiness.   The commercial implies that drinking a Coke will make you a part of the group.   In an iconic commercial featured during the 1979 Super bowl,...

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