Differences Between the State and Federal Court System

Differences Between the State and Federal Court System

DIFFERENCES BETWEEN THE STATE AND FEDERAL COURT SYSTEMS           2                

Differences Between the State and Federal Court Systems
Both the state government and federal government have their own separate court systems. They select their judges differently, hear different types of cases, and are structured a bit differently as well.
The states use different types of ways to select their judges for their courts.   In some states, voters get to vote for their judges during elections.   In other states, the governor appoints their judges. Each state indicates the number of years that the judges will serve. In the case for federal judges, they are elected differently. The President of the United States nominates the judges and then the Senate confirms each nomination. Typically, federal judges hold office for lifetime, unless they are impeached. Judges can be impeached for misconduct and have to go through Congressional impeachment proceedings.  
Different types of cases are heard in state and federal courts. In the state courts, typically, criminal cases, contract cases, family matters, etc. are heard. In the federal courts, cases that are heard are those that involve violation of laws of the United States, public ministers, bankruptcy, disputes between two different states, etc. Depending on each case, the case will be heard upon the state court or the federal courts. This is due to the different laws each state has. For example, Illinois’ laws are different from those of Florida’s laws.   If the case involves state laws and doesn’t interfere with the United States Constitution, the state courts will hear the case not the federal courts.   If cases do interfere with the U.S. Constitution, the federal courts will hear the case not the state courts.
DIFFERENCES BETWEEN THE STATE AND FEDERAL COURT SYSTEMS       3
The structure of the state courts are set up a bit differently compared to the federal courts. In state courts, cases are first heard in trial...

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