Economics Poverty Questions

Economics Poverty Questions

Poverty Questions
1A) – The number of children living in poverty before housing costs is significantly (about 1.2 million) lower than after housing cost. This is a trend that is kept constant over the decade as the number of children living in poverty before housing costs in 2006 is about 2.8 million and the number after housing costs is 3.8 million, showing that throughout 1996 to 2006 the number of children living in poverty is higher after housing costs.
The number of children living in poverty is reduced by 2006, both before and after housing costs as in 1996 the number of children living in poverty before housing costs is 3 million and is reduced to 2.8 million by 2006, whereas the number after housing costs is 4.2 million in 1996 and reduced over the decade.
1B) – Absolute poverty is when an individual or household lives below the poverty line, usually when their income is insufficient for them to afford basic shelter, food, clothing and other necessary commodities needed to live. Relative poverty is when people are poor in comparison to others or compared to the national average. However, relative poverty can vary depending on what it is being compared to, whereas absolute poverty would be the same regardless of the position of others in that society.

Absolute poverty shows that individuals may not be able to access basic commodities to suffice their basic needs. Due to various benefit systems being available in the UK, absolute poverty is fairly rare and the data shows absolute poverty in children in the UK being measured by school attendance and health. Whilst high school attendance is a desirable achievement for many developed countries, the definition of poverty could be said to be subjective and attendance in school may not be seen as vital to others. Relative poverty indicates inequality within a country therefore as long as there is inequality within a country, there will always be relative poverty. The data says the UK to have 60% of children...

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