Fire Prevention and Fire Fighting on Board a Ship

Fire Prevention and Fire Fighting on Board a Ship

INTRODUCTION

Every year more and more ships are lost through fire and collision. Shipboard fire alone, however, results in more total losses of   ships than any other form of casualty. The most common causes of shipboard fire are: maintenance, burning and welding are responsible for nearly 40 percent of all outbreaks. Smoking leads to countless fires that break out when no one expects. Lack of attention, spontaneous combustion and electrical faults are the major causes. The engine room is at special risk from flashbacks in oilfired boilers, leaky pipings carrying oil, overheated bearings and even the accumulation of rubbish (oil rags, dirty oil, tins of oil, etc.).
According to Mikhail Grigorevich Stavitskii 1983, if most shipboard fires can be prevented, then who is responsible for preventing them? The answer is that fire prevention is the shared duty of each and every member of the crew. No fire prevention effort or program can be successful unless it involves everyone aboard ship.
We have noted that every crewmember is responsible for the fire aboard ship. Similarly, every crewmember has a role in the ship's fire prevention program. Because attitude is so much a part of the fire prevention, it is also the most important part of the fire prevention program.
So as with the Fire Figthing, if there is a fire aboard ship, everyone aboard ship must form the emergency response team. According to Lobo Gruppe, Oslo 1987, the emergency response team are consist of the following elements: Platform Manager, Chief Fire Officer, Team Leader and the Team. There is no successful firefighting unless it involves every one aboard a ship.








Review of Related Literature

According to Bennett et al. (1964) from his book Ship Fire Prevention A Master, Supervisory Personnel and Crewman have their own roles and responsibilities in prevention of fire aboard ship.
According to Bergen et al. (1987) the ship must have offshore fire protection organization. The fire...

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