Frank Sinatra Singing It My Way - the Voice of Ol Blue Eyes

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Frank Sinatra Singing It My Way - the Voice of Ol Blue Eyes

Frank Sinatra Singing It My Way - The Voice of Ol Blue Eyes

The heart throb of many a teenage bobby-soxer in the 1940's, Frances Albert Sinatra's career spanned over seven decades.

"Ol Blue Eyes," or "The Voice," as Sinatra was often referred, took the torch from idol Bing Crosby and continued the crooning craze until the end of his career in the late 1990's.

Sinatra began his singing career in his hometown of Hoboken, New Jersey with a local band called the Three Flashes in 1935. Once "Frankie" joined the group, they were renamed the Hoboken Four. In 1939, Sinatra teamed up with the Harry James Band where he recorded and released his first commercial record, From the Bottom of my Heart.

In November 1939, a huge milestone happened for the young crooner. Sinatra was asked by Tommy Dorsey himself to join his band; this would expose Sinatra to a vast audience and help skyrocket him to stardom. Dorsey and Sinatra's relationship was somewhat volatile due to contract negotiations that entitled Dorsey to one-third of Sinatra's entertainment royalties, for a lifetime. Sinatra was later let out of this agreement.

Sinatra launched his solo career after leaving Dorsey's band in the latter part of 1942. During his time with Dorsey, Frank released over forty songs, one of which, I'll Never Smile Again, claimed the top spot in the charts for twelve weeks.

Exuding an eroticism that gave him that sexy bad-boy image seemed to be just what the ladies were looking for at the time. Rumor has it; Ol Blue Eyes could make a young girl faint just by kissing her on the cheek.

Melodic songs, oozing with romance, accompanied by Sinatra's piercing blue eyes and rebel attitude, gave him that yet unmatched sex appeal with a younger female audience. Lyrically seductive songs like All the Way, Embraceable You, Fools Rush In, Autumn Leaves and Close to You, sent girls into frenzy comparable to that which would be seen almost two decades later with a pelvic thrusting...

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