Friedrich Nietzche

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Friedrich Nietzche

Ally Jones
Ms. Winslow
English II Honors
15 February 2012
                                                                Friedrich Nietzsche
Life in Germany during 1840s is hard for someone growing up in the 21st century to relate to. Germany was a country of villages and farms. Jobs outside agriculture were rare. The price of food was extremely high and many people starved to death. Private organizations and churches were trying to help the starving people whereas the government did very little. The telegraph was gaining popularity and news was traveling much faster than ever before (Crisis Page). During this time thousands of Germans were immigrating to the United States (“Irish” 25f). There was a lot going on in Germany during the 1840s and on October 15th 1844 Friedrich Nietzsche was born. Nietzsche grew up in the small town of Röcken, in the Prussian province of Saxony.   Nietzsche’s parents, Carl Ludwig, a Lutheran pastor and former teacher, and Franziska Oehler, married in 1843 and had two children.   In 1849 Nietzsche’s father died from a brain ailment.   The following year his younger brother, Ludwig Joseph also passed away.   Nietzsche then moved to Naumburg.   He lived with his grandmother there until she died in 1856 (“Friedrich” Page).
In 1853 he enrolled in Knaben-bergenschule.   He didn’t do very well in this school so he transfers to a private school.   This prepared him for his time at Domgymnasium.   He spent many hours studying in order to keep up with Greek.   After graduation in 1864, Nietzsche commenced studies in theology, classical philology at the University of Bonn.   While studying there he was exposed to religiously controversial literature that led to the end of his theological studies after just one semester and the loss of his faith.   He had few friends and alliances throughout his life but the ones that he did have were long-standing and loyal.   Some of his first friends included Wilhelm Pinder and Gustav Krug.   Through Gustav Krug...

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