General Motors

General Motors

Introduction


General Motors Corporation (GM), incorporated in 1916, has two core businesses: Automotive and Other Operations and Financing and Insurance Operations. GM participates in the automotive industry through the activities of its automotive business operating segment, General Motors Automotive (GMA), which consists of four regions: GM North America (GMNA), GM Europe (GME), GM Latin America/Africa/Mid-East (GMLAAM) and GM Asia Pacific (GMAP). GMNA designs, manufactures and/or markets vehicles, primarily in North America under the following nameplates: Chevrolet, Pontiac, GMC, Oldsmobile, Buick, Cadillac, Saturn and Hummer. GME, GMLAAM and GMAP primarily meet the demands of customers outside North America with vehicles designed, manufactured and/or marketed under the following nameplates: Opel, Vauxhall, Holden, Saab, Buick, Chevrolet, GMC and Cadillac. GM's automotive regions also have equity ownership in Fiat Auto Holdings, Fuji Heavy Industries Ltd., Suzuki Motor Corporation, Isuzu Motors Ltd., Shanghai General Motors Corporation, SAIC-GM-Wuling Automobile Company Ltd. and GM Daewoo Auto & Technology Company. These investees design, manufacture and market vehicles under the following nameplates: Fiat, Lancia, Alfa Romeo, Subaru, Suzuki, Isuzu, Buick, Wuling, Daewoo and Chevrolet. GM's other operations include the design, manufacturing and marketing of locomotives.
Substantially all of the Company's automotive-related products are marketed through retail dealers and distributors in the United States, Canada and Mexico, and through distributors and dealers overseas. As of December 31, 2003, there were approximately 7,700 GM vehicle dealers in the United States, 800 in Canada and 260 in Mexico. Additionally, there were a total of approximately 15,500 outlets overseas, which include dealers and authorized sales, service and parts outlets.
Until its split-off on December 22, 2003, GM's business included Hughes Electronics Corporation. Hughes'...

View Full Essay