Kate Choppin the Storm

Kate Choppin the Storm

Candice Swanepoel
Dr. Gary Montaño
English 1302
13 February 2013
Forbidden Love
Kate Chopin’s short story   “The Storm” tells about Calixta’s adultery and unhappiness with her husband. Bobinôt and Bobi, Calixta’s husband and son, are at Friedheimer’s grocery store. Bibi notices clouds starting to build, followed by a threatening roar. They both decide to wait at Friedheimer’s store until the storm is over. Bibi asks and wonders about his mother all alone in the house. Meanwhile, Calixta is at home sewing furiously. She is very occupied and does not notice the storm. She finally looks up and goes outside to gather the clothes. She sees Alcee, an old friend of hers. Alcèe asks Calixta if he can wait with her until the storm is over. They are both in her room, as she starts feeling nervous, Calixta stares out a window as Alcee follows, looking over her shoulder. Lightening strikes a chinaberry tree and frightens Calixta, and he comforts her. Alcee brings her close to him. While she worries over Bibi, Alcee looks at her with passionate eyes and remembers the times he has desired her. He cannot resist her beauty. White neck, red moist lips, and her blue eyes disturb him powerfully. As he kisses her, it reminds him of Assumption. They talk about Assumption how he had kissed her. He looks at desires her body, and he compares the white couch Calixta is laying on to her firm flesh. Alcèe starts pleasing her, and they both give themselves up. The rain is over and the sun comes up. Calixta watches Alcee ride away as he smiles at her. Bobinôt and Bibi arrive. She is relieved to know they are okay.

The theme of the story centers on Calixta’s adultery. The storm traps her and Alcèe in her house. The storm is an excuse for the lost lovers to be together. Although the situation of them being trapped together is unexpected, she cannot manage to push him away from the temptation. The storm is a threat, just like Alcèe to Calixta to break apart her house and life that she...

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