Mid Day Meal Scheme in India

Mid Day Meal Scheme in India

Mid Day Meal Scheme
ECONOMIC JOURNALISM REPORT
Submitted By: Mohammad Atif, B.Sc TY-A
Roll no(104)
SYMBIOSIS SCHOOL OF ECONOMICS

Submitted to: Ishita Ghosh, Assistant Professor, Symbiosis School of Economics

Contents
Introduction 2
ABSTRACT 3
History, Management and Finance of The Mid-Day Meal Scheme 4
ROLE OF HONOURABLE SUPREME COURT IN IMPLEMENTATION OF MDMS 6
Achievements And Problems 8
Early Achievements Of the MDMS 8
Universalization of Primary Education: A Misplaced Priority Under MDMS 10
Conclusion 12
Bibliography 13

Introduction
The situation of children in India has been aptly described a ‘silent emergency’.India has one of the worst indicators when it comes to health and education. Nearly 50% of all Indian children are undernourished, whether we use the weigh-for-age or height-for-age criterion. Although there has been some improvement in educational indicators in recent times, the goal of universal elementary education remains quite far, especially in context of girls. Wider awareness of these issues has led to significant initiatives such as the recognition of elementary education as a fundamental right, the introduction of an “educational cess” and the launch of “Sarva Shiksha Abhiyan” (SSA). Another major intervention is the Mid-Day Meal Scheme (hereinafter “MDMS”),which was launched in 1995 with the aim of giving a boost to “universalization of primary, by increasing enrolment, retention and attendance and simultaneously impacting on nutrition of students in primary classes. (Sinha)
The practice of providing meals in primary schools goes back to much before it was officially adopted at the national level in 1995.Tamil Nadu was the first state to implement it and was forerunner of the MDMS while India was still under colonial rule. Meals were funded and provided largely by voluntary organisations till 1957 when the state government also began contributing towards part of the expenses. Today, Tamil Nadu has one of the...

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