Mrs. Dalloway/Love Medicine Comparison

Mrs. Dalloway/Love Medicine Comparison

A People Suppressed
The suppression of women has occurred since the beginning of the century. There have always been women who have expressed their feelings on the matter in many different forms. Two such women are Virginia Woolf and Louise Erdrich. They use their cultures and time periods to show the ways in which women are suppressed, as well as, a silver lining for women to become empowered.   These authors express their views through their literature, especially in their most well-known works, Mrs. Dalloway (Woolf) and Love Medicine (Erdrich). The women in their novels are suppressed in multiple ways. The characters are emotionally, physically, and sexually, and within their marriages.
In Woolf’s novel Mrs. Dalloway, the main character Clarissa Dalloway is a suppressed middle class wife, who enjoys throwing parties for guests. Clarissa is suppressed internally or emotionally by her time period and culture. She lives her life according what is and isn’t appropriate. Virginia Woolf wrote her novel with an emphasis on description, however in her writing she doesn’t go into much detail on certain incidents. Such incidents are those of intimate nature. Woolf writes these scenes with barely any description compared to the rest of the book.
One such scene is that of Clarissa kissing another woman named Sally, when she was a young girl. The absence of depiction of detail on the matter shows the sexual suppression of women. “In her novels, sexual passion becomes masculine property, comprehended by women in moments of empathy rather than experience, as in Mrs. Dalloway when Clarissa kisses Sally Seawall and experiences with brief intensity what men feel” (Showalter). Suppressing that women aren’t supposed to feel or enjoy their sexuality the way that men do.   There is also a scene with her and an old friend named Peter Walsh, where they share a brief kiss whilst both of them are married “Clarissa was as cold as an icicle. There she would sit on the sofa by his...

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