Physical Security

Physical Security

Physical Security



Table of Contents

INTRODUCTION III
ELEMENTS AND DESIGN III
EXAMPLES OF PHYSICAL SECURITY III
PHYSICAL SECURITY ELECTRONIC ACCESS III
CASINOS AND GAMING III
EDUCATION III
TRANSPORTATION III
Goggle Search iii
Dictionary Search iii



Introduction

This paper examines Physical Security from the perspective of perimeter such as gates/guards, building access controls, room access controls, enforcement options, auditing approaches, risk determination for physical attack vectors, etc.   Physical Security describes measures that prevent and/or deter attackers from accessing a facility, resource, or information stored on physical media.   It can be as simple as a locked door or as elaborate as multiple layers of armed guardposts.
In the Global world, Physical Security is the most common mechanisms for access control on doors and security containers. They are found in the vast majority of residences, commercial businesses, educational institutions, and government facilities, and often serve as the primary protection against intrusion and theft.
Elements and design

The field of security engineering has identified three elements to physical security:
1. obstacles, to frustrate trivial attackers and delay serious ones;
2. alarms, security lighting, security guard patrols and closed-circuit television cameras, to make it likely that attacks will be noticed; and
3. security response, to repel, catch or frustrate attackers when an attack is detected.
These features must complement each other as a well designed system. There are four layers of physical security and the goal is to convince potential attackers that the costs of attacking exceed the value of making the attack.
1.   Environmental design
The initial layer of security for a campus, building, office, or physical space uses Crime Prevention through Environmental Design to deter threats.   Some of the most common examples are basic - barbed wire, warning signs and...

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