Pipeline

Pipeline

Introduction

Currently, the share of railways in carrying this load is around 70 per cent, followed by 25 per cent for pipelines and 5 per cent for roads. Railways and roads are inefficient modes of carrying petroleum products because they consume significantly more energy (320 BTU for railways and 1700 BTU for roads to move one tonne of petroleum products over one km) than pipelines for which the comparable figure is only 50-135 BTU. Clearly, pipeline transportation is the most efficient way of moving petroleum products and gases and, hence, is the preferred mode all over the world. In developed countries like the USA and the UK, almost all long distance transportation of petroleum products and gas takes place through pipelines. India is far behind these countries in realizing the full potential of pipelines because it does not have a well-developed pipeline network. A rapid development of pipelines, therefore, is essential to ensure that the share of this mode in the transportation of petroleum products and natural gas reaches the desired level.
It is estimated that around Rs 30,000 crore are likely to be invested over the next 10-12 years in setting up pipeline networks for liquid petroleum products
The efficient and effective movement of natural gas from producing regions to consumption regions requires an extensive and elaborate transportation system. In many instances, natural gas produced from a particular well will have to travel a great distance to reach its point of use. The transportation system for natural gas consists of a complex network of pipelines, designed to quickly and efficiently transport natural gas from its origin, to areas of high natural gas demand. Transportation of natural gas is closely linked to its storage, as well; should the natural gas being transported not be required at that time, it can be put into storage facilities for when it is needed.


Pipeline Industry History
In early 1860 attempts made to lay crude pipeline...

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