Recruiting Violations in College Athletics

Recruiting Violations in College Athletics

Michael P. Murphy
How Recruiting Violations and Academic Misconduct have effectively marred the Amateurism of College Athletics and a Proposal for a Local Solution
IDST J497
Professor Timothy C. Williams
November 30, 2012
Fall 2012

Recruiting Violations and Academic Misconduct in College Athletics
Michael P. Murphy
IDST J497
Williams

The issues of recruiting violations, academic misconduct, administrative negligence, illegal booster involvement, and a general lack of University oversight are all problems that continue to mar the once highly regarded reputations of academic institutions across America. These transgressions, which occur at shockingly consistent rates around campuses nationwide,   (committed by faculty, coaches, players, administrators, and alumni), are effectively compromising the sacred amateurism college athletics has maintained to define its culture and provide credence for its illustrious traditions for over a century. Ethical questions of this magnitude have been pondered by academics and legal stalwarts alike with great depth both at the local and global level for years. Several studies reflect that a substantial percentage of the “major” NCAA recruiting violations and cases of egregious academic misconduct occur typically at institutions where local administrators and financiers have created a “win at all costs” culture pertaining to BCS (Bowl Championship Series) football and the NCAA Men’s Basketball tournament. A handful of local schools sanctioned by the NCAA in the last few decades for recruiting violations and academic misconduct include the University of South Carolina, Alabama, Auburn, Georgia Tech, LSU, Tennessee, Kentucky, and Arkansas. Each year the NCAA collects its constituents: college presidents, athletic directors, and compliance directors (among others), to discuss the current “integrity climate” of college athletics. Sadly, these summits rarely inspire any tangible augmentation to sanctioning guidelines...

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