String Theory

In: Science

String Theory

Craig Kalucki
Comparitive Religion
Tues 4-6:50

String theory and Universal Theories

If we can take a looks garment from a sweater, and pull one string such as in a cartoon, the sweater will untangle leaving a pile of string on the floor. Basically what this implies is we break down something in its simplest form, and all we have left are tiny bits of string, which is basically similar to “String Theory”.

string theory uses a model of one-dimensional strings in place of the particles of quantum physics. These strings, the size of the Planck length vibrate at specific resonant frequencies. The formulas that result from string theory predict more than four dimensions but the extra dimensions are "curled up" within the Planck length.
In addition to the strings, string theory contains another type of fundamental object called a brane, which can have many more dimensions. In some "braneworld scenarios," our universe is actually "stuck" inside of a 3-dimensional brane, called a 3-brane.
Common Sense tells us we live in a world defined by three spatial dimensions and one dimension of time. Mainly, it only takes three numbers to pinpoint your physical location at any given moment. On Earth, these coordinates break down to longitude, latitude and altitude representing the dimensions of length, width and height (or depth). If we put a time stamp on those coordinates, we are pinpointed in time as well.
To strip that down even more, a one-dimensional world would be like a single bead on a measured thread. You can slide the bead forward and you can slide the bead backward, but you only need one number to figure out its exact location on the string: length. Where's the bead? It's at the 6-inch mark, a world that a philosopher would not be able to survive in, due to it being only one way to figure something out.
In a two-dimensional world, it is essentially a flat map, like the playing field in games like Battleship or checkers. You just need length and width...

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