Summary - Chicken Tikka Masala

Summary - Chicken Tikka Masala

Homework – Selective Summary

In the extract "Chicken Tikka Massala" from a speach given by the former British Foreign Secretary Robin Cook,   which was reprinted by The Guardian on 19 April 2001, the orator describes the aspects that, in his opinion, define the British as a race.

He starts by stating that the British are not what one would commonly understand by a race, but a collective of different ones, i.e. communities that have migrated to Britain in the past and now form part of it.
According to Cook, there are only few people in England who are indigenously British.
Most have foreign ancestors and are influenced by other nations that have politically, confessionally and historically influenced Britain.
The orator gives various examples of countries that had a noticeable influence on the Britons, mentioning the Saxons, Angles, Normans, Dutch and, most explicitly, Richard the Lionheart, the British paragon of a man of honour, who, for his part, spoke French and was allied with the Jewish community.

As stated by him, in Britain's capital London, which is home to over 30 ethnic communities, more than 300 languages are spoken, which underlines his intention of depicting the British as a people made up of an abundance of races.

Cook believes that immigration is important both for ethical and economical reasons.   It strengthens a country's economy and increases its attractivity for international companies.   Furthermore, moderately legalising immigration provides the immigrants, who would be there anyway, with legal and social protection.

In a final step, he examines the role "foreign" cultures have been playing for British lifestyle.   He exemplifies that progress mentioning Chicken Tikka Massala, which originally   was an Indian dish that the British have adapted and slightly modified.

284 words

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