To Kill a Mockingbird

To Kill a Mockingbird

To Kill A Mockingbird
A summary of the novel by Harper Lee
Doris Griffin
Colorado Technical University Online
June 23, 2012

Author Note
This paper was prepared for LITR240-1202B-09, Phase 5 IP, taught by Professor Daniel Lambert.

Abstract
Harper Lee wrote only one novel in her life.   To Kill A Mockingbird, in a research done by the Book-Of-The-Month Club in 1991 ranked second to the Bible.   The novel still draws a million new readers each year.   The novel contains two stores, the innocence of childhood as told by Scout and the story of her father who was asked to defend a Negro who was accused of raping a white woman. (Shields, C., 2006)
Two of the themes of the novel are justice and tolerance.   The two are joined together when Atticus explains to Scout how to understand all kinds of people by walking around in their skin. (Shields, C., 2006)
To Kill A Mockingbird is a story to learn a life’s lesson from.   The innocence of a child is genuine and they are taught racism and hate by their elders.   Children at a young age do not see black or white, rich or poor, or understand what racism means.   They are just children who believe that everyone is good and they trust with all their hearts.


To Kill a Mockingbird
The story is set in and old town in Alabama, Maycomb.   The town is described as a quiet and dull town in the 1930’s.   Scout is one of the main characters in the story.   She is naïve and innocent as children are.   She has an older brother, Jem, that she admires.   Their friend, Dill, comes to stay with his aunt during the summer months.   The main attraction for the three children is a recluse, Boo Radley, who lives a few houses down from the Finch house.   The three sneak around the Radley house during the night to try to get a look at Boo.   But to no avail.  
When summer is over, Scout has to start school.   Scout has been reading since she was a small child.   She would sit in her father’s lap as he would read at night and he taught her...

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