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19th Amendment Ratification

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Though the nineteenth amendment may be few in words, there is a story behind it that couldn’t be told with a million. The struggle to gain this amendment was lengthy and difficult, but the final product : “The right of citizens of the United States to vote shall not be denied or abridged by the United States or any State on account of sex,” and, “Congress shall have power to enforce this article by appropriate legislation (US Congress).” This short statement immediately inspired those who supported it and continues to act as fuel for the fire of feminists today. Many events led up to the ratification of the nineteenth amendment. In July of 1848, the woman suffrage movement got a great start in the Seneca Falls convention headed by Elizabeth …show more content…
The ratification of the nineteenth amendment is vital to the life of the women’s rights movement because it is a burning testament that women can get the job done and obtain their dreams together. It took forty-two years for the nineteenth amendment to become constitutional. This persistence from the Woman’s Suffrage movement sets an example for today’s women’s rights advocates, who have been trying for ninety-three years to get another amendment ratified supporting equal rights for women …show more content…
Just three years later, in 1923, a push for another amendment establishing equal rights for women began and is still going today.
• The fight for another amendment has brought together both men and women and united them in a common cause; a cause that is nearly a hundred years old and will continue to drive many people.
• The future of feminism is bright and burning because of the nineteenth amendment and its eventual success. Many young women today are becoming more politically charged because they know that they could be the generation to get the next amendment ratified.
The nineteenth amendment is short and sweet, yet the history of it and the fight to get it ratified is long and bitter. The efforts and lives of many, many women went into obtaining the simple, yet significant power to vote. The nineteenth amendment and amendments to come will continue to inspire people to fight for their rights and keep trying no matter how many times they get shot down. Feminists everywhere thank the brave souls of the Women’s Suffrage movement for their example of perseverance and willingness to get their hands a little dirty to help out a greater

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