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2012 Mth 208 Syllabus

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Course Syllabus MTH/208 – College Mathematics 1 Course: X

Course Start Date: X

Course End Date: X

Campus/Learning Center : X

|[pic] |Syllabus |
| |College of Natural Sciences |
| |MTH/208 Version 6 |
| |College Mathematics I |

Copyright © 2012, 2011, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005 by University of Phoenix. All rights reserved.

Course Description

This course begins a demonstration and examination of various concepts of algebra. It assists in building skills for performing specific mathematical operations and problem solving. These concepts and skills serve as a foundation for subsequent quantitative business coursework. Applications to real-world problems are emphasized throughout the course. This course is the first half of the college mathematics sequence, which is completed in MTH/209: College Mathematics II.

Policies

Faculty and students will be held responsible for understanding and adhering to all policies contained within the following two documents:

• University policies: You must be logged into the student website to view this document. • Instructor policies: This document is posted in the Course Materials forum.

University policies are subject to change. Be sure to read the policies at the beginning of each class. Policies may be slightly different depending on the modality in which you attend class. If you have recently changed modalities, read the policies governing your current class modality.

Course Materials

Rockswold, G. K., & Krieger, T. A. (2013). Beginning and intermediate algebra: With applications and visualization. (3rd ed.). Boston, MA: Addison-Wesley.

All electronic materials are available on the student website.

|Week One: Fundamentals of Algebraic Expressions and Equations |
| |Details |Due |Points |
|Objectives |Identify variables, coefficients, and constants. | | |
| |Simplify algebraic expressions by combining like terms. | | |
| |Evaluate expressions. | | |
| |Solve problems using order of operations. | | |
| |Apply properties of real numbers to algebraic expressions. | | |
| |Translate English phrases to algebraic expressions. | | |
|Reading |Read Ch. 1 of Beginning and Intermediate Algebra. | | |
|Reading |Read the University of Phoenix Material: MyMathLab® Study Plan. | | |
|Participation |Participate in class discussion, be active in classroom problem solving, | |2 |
|Discussion Questions |assist in determining answers to classroom problem sets. | | |
|Nongraded Activities and Preparation |Resource: University of Phoenix Material: Using MyMathLab® | | |
|MyMathLab® Orientation |Complete the MyMathLab® orientation by clicking the MyMathLab® link on the | | |
| |student website and selecting MyMathLab® Orientation under the Homework and| | |
| |Tests tab. | | |
|Nongraded Activities and Preparation |Watch the “Fractions” video located on the student website. | | |
|Fractions |(about 20 minutes) | | |
|Nongraded Activities and Preparation |Watch the Khan Academy’s “Equivalent Fractions” video located on the student | | |
|Equivalent Fractions |website. | | |
| |(about 4.50 minutes) | | |
|Nongraded Activities and Preparation |Watch the Khan Academy’s “Adding Fractions with Unlike Denominators” video | | |
|Adding Fractions with Unlike Denominators |located on the student website. | | |
| |(about 4.06 minutes) | | |
|Nongraded Activities and Preparation |Watch the Khan Academy’s “Subtracting Fractions” video located on the student| | |
|Subtracting Fractions |website. | | |
| |(about 2.26 minutes) | | |
|Nongraded Activities and Preparation |Watch the Khan Academy’s “Multiplying Fractions” video located on the student| | |
|Multiplying Fractions |website. | | |
| |(about 2.26 minutes) | | |
|Nongraded Activities and Preparation |Watch the Khan Academy’s “Dividing Fractions” video located on the student | | |
|Dividing Fractions |website. | | |
| |(about 3.36 minutes) | | |
|Nongraded Activities and Preparation |Watch the Khan Academy’s “Mixed Numbers and Improper Fractions” video located| | |
|Mixed Numbers and Improper Fractions |on the student website. | | |
| |(about 9.14 minutes) | | |
|Nongraded Activities and Preparation |Watch the Khan Academy’s “Adding Mixed Numbers” video located on the student | | |
|Adding Mixed Numbers |website. | | |
| |(about 2.06 minutes) | | |
|Nongraded Activities and Preparation |Watch the Khan Academy’s “Order of Operations Example” video located on the | | |
|Order of Operations Example |student website. | | |
| |(about 14.23 minutes) | | |
|Nongraded Activities and Preparation |Watch the Khan Academy’s “Evaluating an Expression with Multiple Variables” | | |
|Evaluating an Expression with Multiple |video located on the student website. | | |
|Variables |(about 3.59 minutes) | | |
|Nongraded Activities and Preparation |Watch the Khan Academy’s “Simple Equations” video located on the student | | |
|Simple Equations |website. | | |
| |(about 11.06 minutes) | | |
|Individual |Complete the Week One assignment in MyMathLab®. | |5 |
|MyMathLab® Exercises | | | |
|Nongraded Activities and Preparation |Review your Study Plan in MyMathLab® after completing the homework assignment| | |
|Week One Study Plan |for the week. | | |
| |Select topics from this week's materials in your study plan that have been | | |
| |highlighted for further review. | | |
| |Continue working on these topics until you add a minimum of five new correct | | |
| |topics to your Study Plan report. | | |
|Nongraded Activities and Preparation |Complete the Week One self-check in MyMathLab®. | | |
|Week One Self-Check | | | |

|Week Two: Linear Equations and Inequalities |
| |Details |Due |Points |
|Objectives | | | |
| |Evaluate linear equations. | | |
| |Solve linear equations. | | |
| |Solve equations using formulas. | | |
| |Use linear equations and inequalities in real-world applications. | | |
| |Solve linear inequalities. | | |
|Reading |Read Ch. 2 of Beginning and Intermediate Algebra. | | |
|Participation |Participate in class discussion, be active in classroom problem solving, | |2 |
|Discussion Questions |assist in determining answers to classroom problem sets. | | |
|Nongraded Activities and Preparation |Watch the “Variables and Equations” video located on the student website. | | |
|Variables and Equations |(about 20 minutes) | | |
|Nongraded Activities and Preparation |Watch the Khan Academy’s “One-Step Equations” video located on the student | | |
|One-Step Equations |website. | | |
| |(about 12.30 minutes) | | |
|Nongraded Activities and Preparation |Watch the Khan Academy’s “Converting Fahrenheit to Celsius” video located | | |
|Converting Fahrenheit to Celsius |on the student website. | | |
| |(about 2.58 minutes) | | |
|Nongraded Activities and Preparation |Watch the Khan Academy’s “Equations 2” video located on the student | | |
|Equations 2 |website. | | |
| |(about 8.41 minutes) | | |
|Nongraded Activities and Preparation |Watch the Khan Academy’s “Algebraic Word Problem” video located on the | | |
|Algebraic Word Problem |student website. | | |
| |(about 8.02 minutes) | | |
|Nongraded Activities and Preparation |Watch the Khan Academy’s “Two-Step Equations” video located on the student | | |
|Two-Step Equations |website. | | |
| |(about 13.50 minutes) | | |
|Nongraded Activities and Preparation |Watch the Khan Academy’s “Solving Inequalities” video located on the | | |
|Solving Inequalities |student website. | | |
| |(about 4.32 minutes) | | |
|Nongraded Activities and Preparation |Watch the Khan Academy’s “Solving Equations with the Distributive Property”| | |
|Solving Equations with the Distributive |video located on the student website. | | |
|Property |(about 6.04 minutes) | | |
|Individual |Complete the Week Two assignment in MyMathLab®. | |5 |
|MyMathLab® Exercises | | | |
|Nongraded Activities and Preparation |Complete the Week Two study plan in MyMathLab®. | | |
|Week Two | | | |
|Study Plan | | | |
|Nongraded Activities and Preparation |Review your Study Plan in MyMathLab® after completing the homework | | |
|Week Two Self-Check |assignment for the week. | | |
| |Select topics from this week's materials in your study plan that have been | | |
| |highlighted for further review. | | |
| |Continue working on these topics until you add a minimum of five new | | |
| |correct topics to your Study Plan report. | | |
|Formative Assessment |Faculty may design a monitoring tool, or problem set to determine the | | |
|Nongraded |student’s understanding and may alter their instruction based on the | | |
| |results of the assessment. Please insert formative assessment here. | | |
|Learning Team Instructions |Resource: Learning Team Toolkit | |1 |
|Learning Team Charter |Complete the Learning Team Charter. | | |
|Learning Team |Complete the Week Two Learning Team Exercises | |4 |
|Activity |FACULTY CAN CHOOSE ONE OF THE FOLLOWING OR DESIGN AN ALTERNATE ASSIGNMENT | | |
| |TO MEET THE COURSE OBJECTIVES. | | |
| | | | |
| |Complete exercises from the text book (Faculty are to list 20-25 problems | | |
| |students should complete) | | |
| |Complete the worksheet posted in OLS (Faculty can develop worksheets) | | |
| |Complete the application problems (Faculty can develop application problems| | |
| |students can complete) | | |
| |A writing activity connecting the math to real-life applications | | |
| |A writing assignment based on the weekly discussion questions provided | | |
| |Alternate team project as designed by the faculty | | |

|Week Three: Graphs and Linear Functions |
| |Details |Due |Points |
|Objectives | | | |
| |Generate graphs. | | |
| |Determine the intercepts of a linear function. | | |
| |Determine the slope of a linear function. | | |
| |Create a linear equation using data. | | |
| |Use linear functions in real-world applications. | | |
| |Identify representations of functions. | | |
|Reading |Read Ch. 3 of Beginning and Intermediate Algebra. | | |
|Reading |Read parts 8.1 and 8.2 in Ch. 8 of Beginning and Intermediate Algebra. | | |
|Participation |Participate in class discussion, be active in classroom problem solving, | |2 |
|Discussion Questions |assist in determining answers to classroom problem sets. | | |
|Nongraded Activities and Preparation |Watch the “Linear Functions” video located on the student website. | | |
|Linear Functions |(about 20 minutes) | | |
|Nongraded Activities and Preparation |Watch the Khan Academy’s “Linear Equations in Standard Form” video located | | |
|Linear Equations in Standard Form |on the student website. | | |
| |(about 10.08 minutes) | | |
|Nongraded Activities and Preparation |Watch the Khan Academy’s “Graphing a Line in Slope-Intercept Form” video | | |
|Graphing a Line in Slope-Intercept Form |located on the student website. | | |
| |(about 3.01 minutes) | | |
|Nongraded Activities and Preparation |Watch the Khan Academy’s “Graphs of Linear Equations” video located on the | | |
|Graphs of Linear Equations |student website. | | |
| |(about 13.10 minutes) | | |
|Nongraded Activities and Preparation |Watch the Khan Academy’s “Slope of a Line” video located on the student | | |
|Slope of a Line |website. | | |
| |(about 4.40 minutes) | | |
|Nongraded Activities and Preparation |Watch the Khan Academy’s “Slope Example” video located on the student | | |
|Slope Example |website. | | |
| |(about 4.03 minutes) | | |
|Individual |Complete the Week Three assignment in MyMathLab®. | |5 |
|MyMathLab® Exercises | | | |
|Nongraded Activities and Preparation |Complete the Week Three study plan in MyMathLab®. | | |
|Week Three Study Plan | | | |
|Nongraded Activities and Preparation |Review your Study Plan in MyMathLab® after completing the homework | | |
|Week Three Self-Check |assignment for the week. | | |
| |Select topics from this week's materials in your study plan that have been | | |
| |highlighted for further review. | | |
| |Continue working on these topics until you add a minimum of five new | | |
| |correct topics to your Study Plan report. | | |
|Individual Midterm |Complete the In-Class midterm examination. | |15 |
|Examination | | | |
|Summative Assessment | | | |
|Learning Team |Complete the Week Three Learning Team Exercises | |5 |
|Activity |FACULTY CAN CHOOSE ONE OF THE FOLLOWING OR DESIGN AN ALTERNATE ASSIGNMENT | | |
| |TO MEET THE COURSE OBJECTIVES. | | |
| | | | |
| |Complete exercises from the text book (Faculty are to list 20-25 problems | | |
| |students should complete) | | |
| |Complete the worksheet posted in OLS (Faculty can develop worksheets) | | |
| |Complete the application problems (Faculty can develop application problems| | |
| |students can complete) | | |
| |A writing activity connecting the math to real-life applications | | |
| |A writing assignment based on the weekly discussion questions provided | | |
| |Alternate team project as designed by the faculty | | |

|Week Four: Systems of Two-Variable Linear Equations |
| |Details |Due |Points |
|Objectives | | | |
| |Solve systems of linear equations by graphing. | | |
| |Solve systems of linear equations algebraically. | | |
| |Solve systems of linear inequalities. | | |
| |Use systems of equations and inequalities in real-world applications. | | |
|Reading |Read Ch. 4 of Beginning and Intermediate Algebra. | | |
|Participation |Participate in class discussion, be active in classroom problem solving, | |2 |
|Discussion Questions |assist in determining answers to classroom problem sets. | | |
|Nongraded Activities and Preparation |Watch the “Inequalities” video located on the student website. | | |
|Inequalities |(about 20 minutes) | | |
|Nongraded Activities and Preparation |Watch the Khan Academy’s “Solving Systems by Graphing_3” video located on | | |
|Solving Systems by Graphing_3 |the student website. | | |
| |(about 5.08 minutes) | | |
|Nongraded Activities and Preparation |Watch the Khan Academy’s “The Substitution Method” video located on the | | |
|The Substitution Method |student website. | | |
| |(about 3.20 minutes) | | |
|Nongraded Activities and Preparation |Watch the Khan Academy’s “Systems of Equations” video located on the | | |
|Systems of Equations |student website. | | |
| |(about 9.57 minutes) | | |
|Nongraded Activities and Preparation |Watch the Khan Academy’s “Graphing Linear Inequalities in Two Variables” | | |
|Graphing Linear Inequalities in Two |video located on the student website. | | |
|Variables |(about 2.42 minutes) | | |
|Nongraded Activities and Preparation |Watch the Khan Academy’s “Graphing Systems of Inequalities” video located | | |
|Graphing Systems of Inequalities |on the student website. | | |
| |(about 4.56 minutes) | | |
|Nongraded Activities and Preparation |Review your Study Plan in MyMathLab® after completing the homework | | |
|Week Four Study Plan |assignment for the week. | | |
| |Select topics from this week's materials in your study plan that have been | | |
| |highlighted for further review. | | |
| |Continue working on these topics until you add a minimum of five new | | |
| |correct topics to your Study Plan report. | | |
|Nongraded Activities and Preparation |Complete the Week Four self-check in MyMathLab®. | | |
|Week Four Self-Check | | | |
|Formative Assessment |Faculty may design a monitoring tool, or problem set to determine the | | |
|Nongraded |student’s understanding and may alter their instruction based on the | | |
| |results of the assessment. Please insert formative assessment here. | | |
|Learning Team |Complete the Week Four Learning Team Exercises | |5 |
|Activity |FACULTY CAN CHOOSE ONE OF THE FOLLOWING OR DESIGN AN ALTERNATE ASSIGNMENT | | |
| |TO MEET THE COURSE OBJECTIVES. | | |
| | | | |
| |Complete exercises from the text book (Faculty are to list 20-25 problems | | |
| |students should complete) | | |
| |Complete the worksheet posted in OLS (Faculty can develop worksheets) | | |
| |Complete the application problems (Faculty can develop application problems| | |
| |students can complete) | | |
| |A writing activity connecting the math to real-life applications | | |
| |A writing assignment based on the weekly discussion questions provided | | |
| |Alternate team project as designed by the faculty | | |

|Week Five: Exponents |
| |Details |Due |Points |
|Objectives | | | |
| |Use exponents in algebraic expressions. | | |
| |Apply exponential principles to scientific notation. | | |
|Reading |Read sections 5.1 & 5.5 in Ch. 5 of Beginning and Intermediate Algebra. | | |
|Participation |Participate in class discussion, be active in classroom problem solving, | |2 |
|Discussion Questions |assist in determining answers to classroom problem sets. | | |
|Nongraded Activities and Preparation |Watch the “Decimals and Exponents” video located on the student website. | | |
|Decimals and Exponents |(about 23.0 minutes) | | |
|Nongraded Activities and Preparation |Watch the Khan Academy’s “Exponent Properties Involving Products” video | | |
|Exponent Properties Involving Products |located on the student website. | | |
| |(about 14 minutes) | | |
|Nongraded Activities and Preparation |Watch the Khan Academy’s “Exponent Properties Involving Quotients” video | | |
|Exponent Properties Involving Quotients |located on the student website. | | |
| |(about 9.22 minutes) | | |
|Nongraded Activities and Preparation |Watch the Khan Academy’s “Zero, Negative, and Fractional Exponents” video | | |
|Zero, Negative, and Functional Exponents |located on the student website. | | |
| |(about 14.04 minutes) | | |
|Nongraded Activities and Preparation |Watch the Khan Academy’s “Scientific Notation Examples” video located on | | |
|Scientific Notation Examples |the student website. | | |
| |(about 12.49 minutes) | | |
|Nongraded Activities and Preparation |Review your Study Plan in MyMathLab® after completing the homework | | |
|Week Five Study Plan |assignment for the week. | | |
| |Select topics from this week's materials in your study plan that have been | | |
| |highlighted for further review. | | |
| |Continue working on these topics until you add a minimum of five new | | |
| |correct topics to your Study Plan report. | | |
|Individual |Complete the Week Five assignment in MyMathLab®. | |5 |
|MyMathLab® Exercises | | | |
|Individual |Complete the In-Class final examination. | |30 |
|Final Examination |A score of 50% or greater must be achieved to pass the course. | | |
|Summative Assessment | | | |
|Learning Team |Complete the Week Five Learning Team Exercises | |5 |
|Activity |FACULTY CAN CHOOSE ONE OF THE FOLLOWING OR DESIGN AN ALTERNATE ASSIGNMENT | | |
| |TO MEET THE COURSE OBJECTIVES. | | |
| | | | |
| |Complete exercises from the text book (Faculty are to list 20-25 problems | | |
| |students should complete) | | |
| |Complete the worksheet posted in OLS (Faculty can develop worksheets) | | |
| |Complete the application problems (Faculty can develop application problems| | |
| |students can complete) | | |
| |A writing activity connecting the math to real-life applications | | |
| |A writing assignment based on the weekly discussion questions provided | | |
| |Alternate team project as designed by the faculty | | |

Faculty: if you are not using the discussion questions in your class, then you should delete them from your syllabus. You may wish to use the discussion questions in the weekly team assignment or assign them in class as part of your problem set.:

Optional Discussion Questions

Week One Discussion Questions

• Prime numbers are often used in cryptography. Why do you think prime numbers would be more useful for creating codes than composite numbers?

• Explain a real-world problem that you used math to solve. What mathematical expressions did you use in your problem-solving? Define your variables and explain your expression.

• Why is it important to follow the order of operations? What are some possible outcomes when the order of operations is ignored? If you invented a new notation where the order of operations was made clear, what would you do to make it clear?

• Explain the main differences among integers, rational numbers, real numbers, and irrational numbers. How are these used in everyday life? How would you explain the use of each to someone who did not know about the differences?

Week Two Discussion Questions

• If the cost of a cell phone has decreased 400% during the past 10 years, does that correspond to a cost decrease of four times? Explain your answer as though you were talking to someone who has never taken algebra.

• Can a linear equation and a linear inequality be solved in the same way? Explain why. What makes them different?

• What are the four steps for solving an equation? Should any other factors be accounted for when solving an equation? Should any factors be accounted for when explaining how to solve an equation? Explain your answer.

• What are the four steps for solving a problem? Should any other factors be accounted for when solving a problem? Should any factors be accounted for when explaining how to solve a problem? Explain your answer.

Week Three Discussion Questions

• Imagine that a line on a Cartesian graph is approximately the distance y in feet a person walks in x hours. What does the slope of this line represent? How is this graph useful? Provide another example for your colleagues to explain.

• What is the difference between a scatterplot and a line graph? Provide an example of each. Does one seem better than the other? In what ways is it better?

• If a line has no y-intercept, what can you say about the line? What if a line has no x-intercept? Think of a real-life situation where a graph would have no x- or y-intercept. Will what you say about the line always be true in that situation?

• Explain the concept of modeling. How does a model describe known data and predict future data? How do models break down? Can you think of an example?

• What are the differences among expressions, equations, and functions? Provide examples of each.

Week Four Discussion Questions

• How do you write a system of linear equations in two variables? Explain this in words and by using mathematical notation in an equation.

• What are two symbolic techniques used to solve linear equations? Which do you feel is better? Explain why.

• How many solution sets do systems of linear inequalities have? Do solutions to systems of linear inequalities need to satisfy both inequalities? In what case might they not?

• How many solutions does a system of linear equations in three variables have? Can systems of linear equations have infinite solutions? Under what circumstances could that occur?

• Identify four steps to solving a linear system in three variables. Do these steps have to be done in a certain order? Can any steps be skipped? Explain why or why not.

• Do the equations x = 4y + 1 and x = 4y – 1 have the same solution? How might you explain your answer to someone who has not learned algebra?

Week Five Discussion Questions

• What are the practical usages of scientific notation? Why is scientific notation so important in our modern day society?

• What would be the value of expressing something like the national debt in scientific notation? What information would be lost in such a usage? Is that important? Explain why or why not.

• Using the readings discussed in this course, provide one real-world application of the information learned that has been the most valuable to you. Why has it been valuable?

• How do you think you will use the information you learned in this course in the future? Which concepts will be most important to you? Which will be least important? Explain your answers.

• If your son or daughter asked you why they needed to learn math in school, what would you tell them?

• Provide one real-world example of when graphing could be useful. Do you think you would ever use graphing in your life to solve problems? Explain why or why not.

• What concept learned in this course was the easiest for you to grasp? Why do you think it was easy for you? Which was the hardest? What would have made it easier to learn?

• Knowing what you know now about mathematics, how would you explain to a friend the value of mathematics in everyday life?

Copyright

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Microsoft®, Windows®, and Windows NT® are registered trademarks of Microsoft Corporation in the United States and/or other countries. All other company and product names are trademarks or registered trademarks of their respective companies. Use of these marks is not intended to imply endorsement, sponsorship, or affiliation.

Edited in accordance with University of Phoenix® editorial standards and practices.

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...2012 Catalog Volume 20 Issue 1 March 5, 2012 – December 31, 2012 This Catalog contains information, policies, procedures, regulations and requirements that were correct at the time of publication and are subject to the terms and conditions of the Enrollment Agreement entered into between the Student and ECPI University. In keeping with the educational mission of the University, the information, policies, procedures, regulations and requirements contained herein are continually being reviewed, changed and updated. Consequently, this document cannot be considered binding. Students are responsible for keeping informed of official policies and meeting all relevant requirements. When required changes to the Catalog occur, they will be communicated through catalog inserts and other means until a revised edition of the Catalog is published. The policies in this Catalog have been approved under the authority of the ECPI University Board of Trustees and, therefore, constitute official University policy. Students should become familiar with the policies in this Catalog. These policies outline both student rights and student responsibilities. The University reserves the right and authority at any time to alter any or all of the statements contained herein, to modify the requirements for admission and graduation, to change or discontinue programs of study, to amend any regulation or policy affecting the student body, to increase tuition and fees, to deny admission, to revoke an offer...

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