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50 Books for Kindergarten

In: English and Literature

Submitted By awangaa
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The Lexington Public Library 50 Books to Read in Kindergarten is a diverse list of titles including award-winning books, notable children’s authors, and promising new works chosen by experienced Children’s Librarians at the Lexington Public Library. More... See the original "50 Books to Read In Kindergarten" and "50 More Books to Read In Kindergarten" lists Showing 50 results

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A Splendid Friend, Indeed
A Splendid Friend, Indeed (Theodor Seuss Geisel Honor Book (Awards)) Author: Suzanne Bloom Publisher: Boyds Mills Press (2005) Binding: Hardcover, 32 pages IllustratorSuzanne Bloom Item Call NumberE BLOOM When a studious polar bear meets an inquisitive goose, they learn to be friends.

Questions to talk about with your child • The polar bear has to be very patient with goose's questions. When was a time you had to be patient? Was it hard to wait? • How would the story be different if the polar bear wasn't patient and lost his temper? How do you think the goose would feel? • Who is your best friend and why? • Do you know what makes a friend? • Can you be friends with someone who is different than you?

Fun things to do together • Look at the many colors in Bloom's illustrations. Ask what colors the different objects are. See if your child can locate these colors in his/her room or clothing. • Pack a snack and blanket. Enjoy a picnic outside with your child. • Play "Goose, Goose, Bear" instead of "Duck, Duck, Goose" • Draw a picture of you and your best friend doing something together that you both like.

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• Have a "Blue / White" color walk. Point out all the different blue and white objects that you can find.

Book Skills Loves Books (Print Motivation) The polar bear's enjoyment of reading, writing, thinking, etc. Tell A Story (Narrative Skills) The simplicity of the drawings allow a child to tell the story without reading.

Anansi and the Moss Covered Rock
Anansi and the Moss-Covered Rock Author: Eric A. Kimmel Publisher: Holiday House (1990) Binding: Paperback, 32 pages

IllustratorJanet Stevens Item Call NumberE KIMME Anansi the Spider uses a strange moss-covered rock in the forest to trick all the other animals until Little Bush Deer decides he needs to learn a lesson.

Questions to talk about with your child • How did Anansi trick his friends and why did he want to? • How do you think his friends felt when they realized they had been tricked? • Who tricked Anansi and how did they do it? • Do you think Anansi learned his lesson?

Fun things to do together • Go the grocery store and pick out some of the foods that are in the bookyams, bananas, melons. Compare and contrast weight, texture and color. • Check out some African music from the library. • Find the continent of Africa on a globe or map. Look for Ghana, Kenya and South Africa since they are home to many of the animals in the story.

Book Skills Loves Books (Print Motivation) The bright illustrations and very funny story will encourage several readings. Tell A Story (Narrative Skills) This West African folk tale lends itself perfectly to a captivating story.

Bark, George
Bark, George Manufacturer: Scholastic Inc. Part Number: Price:

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IllustratorJules Feiffer

Item Call NumberE FEIFF A mother dog tries to teach her pup how to bark, and is surprised at why he wasn't learning.

Questions to talk about with your child • What was your favorite part of the story? • What do animals do when they go to the veterinarian? • What are the animal noises made in this book? • What is the order of the animals pulled from George? • Do you think George swallowed a human at the end of the book?

Fun things to do together • Take an empty box and pretend that it is George. Pull the animals in the book out of the box when telling the story. • Set up a pretend vet's office with band aids, clipboards, Doctor kits, and stuffed animals. • Visit a pet store or a vet's office.

Book Skills Tell A Story (Narrative Skills) The simple storyline makes this book easy to retell with stuffed animals. Make Sounds (Phonological Awareness) Children will love making the animal sounds with the story.

Bedtime for Frances
Bedtime for Frances Author: Russell Hoban Publisher: HarperFestival (1995) Binding: Library Binding, 32 pages

IllustratorRussell Hoban Item Call NumberE HOBAN Frances has trouble going to sleep because of frightening sounds and objects that may be going to get her

Questions to talk about with your child • What time is Frances's bedtime? • Does Frances want to go to bed? • What does Frances think is in her room? Is it real? • What snack does Frances get to eat? • What is the wind's job?

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• Does Frances finally go to sleep?

Fun things to do together • Talk about bedtime routines in your house and create a routine for a stuffed animal or doll. • Use animals or dolls to recreate the song "10 in the Bed". • Sing the song "Twinkle, Twinkle". • Throw a blanket on a chair and what do you see? A giant? A lion? • Draw simple pajamas for a set of paper dolls.

Book Skills Loves Books (Print Motivation) A story that many children relate to and are anxious to find out the outcome encouraging them to read. New Words (Vocabulary) The short concise sentences relate the thoughts and actions so clearly and keep the story moving Tell A Story (Narrative Skills) The short concise sentences relate the thoughts and actions so clearly and keep the story moving.

Book! Book! Book!
Image of Book! Book! Book!

Book! Book! Book! Author: Deborah Bruss Publisher: Arthur A. Levine Books (2001) Binding: Hardcover, 40 pages

IllustratorTiphanie Beeke Item Call NumberE BRUSS When the children go back to school, the animals on the farm are bored, so they go into the library in town trying to find something to do.

Questions to talk about with your child • What was your favorite part of the story? • Which of the animals is your favorite one? • What animal sounds can you make? • What kind of book would you ask for from the librarian? • Have you ever seen a cow in the library? A horse? A duck?

Fun things to do together • Sing "Old MacDonald had a Farm" • Take your favorite stuffed animal to the library and see if the librarian can talk to them. • Check out some books on cows, chickens, frogs, horse, and pigs. • Make lunch bag puppets of the animals and re-enact the story. • Draw or make a barn and some animals to go in it.

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Book Skills Tell A Story (Narrative Skills) This book is ideal for working with patterning and sequencing of a story. Make Sounds (Phonological Awareness) Children will love making the animals sounds in this book.

Caps For Sale
Caps for Sale Board Book: A Tale of a Peddler, Some Monkeys and Their Monkey Business (Reading Rainbow Books) Author: Esphyr Slobodkina Publisher: HarperFestival (2008) Binding: Board book, 32 pages IllustratorEsphyr Slobodkina Item Call NumberE SLOBO A band of mischievous monkeys steals every one of a peddler's caps while he takes a nap under a tree.

Questions to talk about with your child • What was the man selling? What were the colors of all his hats? • Can you count the hats he wore on his head? • How did he feel when he lost the hats? • What did the monkeys do in the story? What did you think of the monkeys? • How did he get his hats back? • Why didn't the man sell any hats?

Fun things to do together • Make a hat from newspaper or other material. http://www.dltkkids.com/crafts/columbus/newspaper_sailors_hats.htm • Act out the story with the child acting as both the peddler and the monkey. • Balance several soft things on your head and see how far you can go. • Cut out twenty circles of different colors from construction paper and move the circles around to see how many patterns you can create. • Count the circles and sort them by color.

Book Skills Loves Books (Print Motivation) The playful monkeys and colorful illustrations draw the child in. Repetitive phrases encourage the child to say the words along with the reader for a more interactive, fun experience and help build confidence for budding readers. Tell A Story (Narrative Skills) The simple story leads the reader to a satisfying conclusion. Repetitive phrases throughout the story structure aid children in understanding and retelling the story.

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Click Clack Moo
Click, Clack, Moo: Cows That Type Author: Doreen Cronin Publisher: Scholastic (2005) Binding: Paperback, 32 pages

IllustratorDoreen Cronin Item Call NumberE CRONI When Farmer Brown's cows find a typewriter in the barn they start making demands, and go on strike when the farmer refuses to give them what they want.

Questions to talk about with your child • Why do the cows and the hens ask Farmer Brown for blankets? • What do the cows do when Farmer Brown refuses to help them? • What deal do the cows make with Farmer Brown to get the blankets? • When the ducks get the typewriter, what do the ducks want from Farmer Brown? • What is a "neutral" party?

Fun things to do together • Show your child a keyboard and help them type a simple note to Farmer Brown asking for something they want; Print it out for them to see. • As you read, ask your child to "read" the Click, clack refrains with you and be very enthusiastic about the sounds the animals make. • Point to the "Click, clack" refrains as you read them to emphasize the text and give the child a cue as to when to say them with you. • See if you can find a manual typewriter, then you can experiment with the clicking noises. • Sing "Old MacDonald Had a Farm" • Play a game of "Duck, Duck, Goose"

Book Skills Tell A Story (Narrative Skills) The story structure, the actions of the animals, and the reactions of the farmer make this story a good choice for practicing description of events and retelling a story in sequence. Use Books (Print Awareness) The print is black, large and bold, often against bright white space or in boxed areas resembling typed letters, making the words stand out on the page. The font makes the words easy to point to as you read aloud, capturing the child's attention and encouraging them to follow along.

Corduroy
Corduroy (40th Anniversary Edition) Author: Don Freeman Publisher: Viking Juvenile (2008) Binding: Hardcover, 40 pages

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IllustratorDon Freeman Item Call NumberE FREE A toy bear in a department store wants a number of things, but when a little girl finally buys him he finds what he has always wanted most of all

Questions to talk about with your child • What is your favorite part of the story? • Do you think it would be fun to run around a store at night when no one is there? • Do you have a favorite bear? • Do you like to ride the escalator in big stores?

Fun things to do together • Set up your stuffed bears and other animals and have a Teddy Bear Picnic. • Learn (or pretend) to sew a button on like Lisa does for Corduroy. • Hide your teddy bear under the covers (but keep the ears out!) and see if someone else can find him. • Act out the nursery rhyme "Teddy Bear, Teddy Bear".

Book Skills Loves Books (Print Motivation) The soft and gentle story about finding a home and a friend will encourage children to talk about their own stuffed animal friends. New Words (Vocabulary) This book has some challenging words in the story such as "escalator", "watchman", and "toy department".

Don't Let the Pigeon Drive the Bus
Don't Let the Pigeon Drive the Bus! Author: Mo Willems Publisher: Hyperion Press (2003) Binding: Hardcover, 40 pages

IllustratorMo Willems Item Call NumberE WILLE When a bus driver takes a break from his route, a very unlikely volunteer springs up to take his place - a pigeon! Series: Don't Let the Pigeon Stay Up Late (2006), The Pigeon Finds a Hot Dog (2004), The Pigeon Wants a Puppy (2008)

Questions to talk about with your child • Where do you think Pigeon would go if he drove the bus? • How do we know how Pigeon feels when he does not get to drive the bus? • How does Pigeon lose some of his feathers? • How do you know pigeon feels? What do you think pigeon is feeling when there are no words - just black squiggles above his head?

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Fun things to do together • Sing The Wheels on the Bus. Then sing The Pigeon on the Bus and make up your own words. For example, "The Pigeon on the bus flaps his wings..." • Pretend to be on a bus. Arrange kitchen chairs in rows to resemble bus seats. Take turns being the driver and the pigeon begging to drive the bus. • Visit a local park or downtown area to feed and observe the pigeons. Try to count and categorize them by color, markings, size, etc. • Create your own sequel to this book. Don't Let the Pigeon Bake a Cake, Ride a Horse, etc.

Book Skills Loves Books (Print Motivation) With a funny and engaging character like Pigeon, children learn to love and laugh along with books. Use Books (Print Awareness) With text highlighted in different colors, as well as us bold print, children can learn how the words move on the page.

Down the Road
Down the Road Author: Alice Schertle Publisher: Sandpiper (2000) Binding: Paperback, 40 pages

IllustratorE.B. Lewis Item Call NumberE SCHER Hetty takes her first trip to the store by herself and is very careful with the eggs she's bought, until she stops to pick apples.

Questions to talk about with your child • Where does the story take place? City or country? How can you tell? • What instructions did Mama and Papa give to Hetty? • What else besides eggs could you buy at Mr. Birdie's Emporium and Dry Goods Store? • How did Hetty feel when she broke the eggs? • Why did Papa and Mama climb the apple tree? • Do you think Mama and Papa will let Hetty go to the store again by herself? Why or why not?

Fun things to do together • Point to and make sound effects for words like "thup", "bump", "squish" and "splat" to reinforce phonological awareness. • Play running a store like Mr. Birdies. • Practice carrying eggs in a basket. • Make an apple pie together.

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• Climb a tree together.

Book Skills New Words (Vocabulary) This story provides an opportunity to discuss words such as "dry goods", "dillydally" and "skimming". Make Sounds (Phonological Awareness) Hetty's marching words are fun to say. Point out the words "splat" and "tweet, tweet, tweet" and ask your child how to make that sound.

Five Little Monkeys Jumping on the Bed
Five Little Monkeys Jumping on the Bed Big Book Author: Eileen Christelow Publisher: Sandpiper (2006) Binding: Paperback, 32 pages

IllustratorEileen Christelow Item Call NumberE CHRIST As soon as they say good night to Mama, the five little monkeys start to jump on their bed. But trouble lies ahead as, one by one, they fall off and hurt themselves.

Questions to talk about with your child • What is your favorite part of this story? • How many monkeys were jumping on the bed at the beginning of the story and at the end of the story? • Did any of the monkeys stop jumping when another monkey got hurt? Why? • Did you ever get hurt? Did your parents help you? Did you have to go to the doctor?

Fun things to do together • Count from 1 to 5 forwards and backwards • Draw a monkey and make a band-aid to put on his head - give it a kiss to feel better • Put a mattress on the floor and jump on it while singing the story (or find a rhythmic instrument, such as maracas, to play while chanting the book in rhythm) • Get a box and a toy. Help your child place the toy on top of the box, beside it, inside it, under it, and over it; then have your child do it themselves to practice obeying ?position/spatial word' directions.

Book Skills Tell A Story (Narrative Skills) The story is simple and repetitive, making it simple and fun for children to re-tell (or sing)! Use Books (Print Awareness)

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The illustrations make it easy to highlight the action words on the page - i.e. "jumping on the bed".

Frog and Toad are Friends
Frog and Toad Are Friends Manufacturer: Harper & Row Part Number: Price:

IllustratorArnold Lobel Item Call NumberE LOBEL Five warm, funny stories of Frog and Toad's friendship that can be read by parents or a beginning reader. Series: Frog and Toad All Year (1976), Adventures of Frog and Toad (1979), Days with Frog and Toad (1979), Frog and Toad Together (1999)

Questions to talk about with your child • What are some of the nice things that Frog and Toad do for each other? • What do you like to do with your friends? • Have you ever received a letter in the mail? Who was it from? • Which story was your favorite? • How do you think Frog and toad became friends?

Fun things to do together • Print out a calendar and draw a picture for each month. • Make up a story about one of your friends then tell it to them. • Make a collage from lost and odd buttons. • Design silly swimsuits for the members of your family. • Write a letter to one of your friends and send it in the mail.

Book Skills Tell A Story (Narrative Skills) These stories about Frog and Toad provide children with five simple examples of the everyday adventures of these beloved characters. Children can build upon the structure of those tales when learning to tell their own stories. Use Books (Print Awareness) A beginning reader like this title helps show children how to use a book. Run your finger along the words as you read to demonstrate how print runs from left to right along the page.

Goldilocks and the Three Bears
Goldilocks and the Three Bears Author: Publisher: Dial (1988)

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Binding: Hardcover, 32 pages

IllustratorJames Marshall Item Call NumberE MARSH Three bears return home from a walk to find a little girl asleep in baby bear's bed.

Questions to talk about with your child • Look carefully at the pictures of the Bears' home. Do you see anything in the pictures that tell you Goldilocks is in the bear's house? • Which bear is big? Which is small? What are the different sizes of furniture for each of the bears? • How would you feel if Goldilocks came into your house without permission? Should you ever go in to someone's house without permission?

Fun things to do together • Act out the story with your child with puppets or other toys. • Take a look at Baby Bear's messy room. Identify as many objects as possible.

Book Skills New Words (Vocabulary) This story offers opportunity to learn and talk about the concepts of small, medium, and large (little, bigger, biggest) and discuss the concept of size comparison. Tell A Story (Narrative Skills) This classic story's structure is a great example of the elements of a story (beginning, middle, end and perfectly identified characters) and a perfect choice for practicing how to tell a story and describe events.

Green Eggs and Ham
Green Eggs and Ham (I Can Read It All by Myself Beginner Books) Author: Dr. Seuss Publisher: Random House Books for Young Readers (1960) Binding: Hardcover, 72 pages IllustratorDr. Seuss Item Call NumberE SEUSS Sam-I-Am mounts a determined campaign to convince another Seuss character to eat a plate of green eggs and ham.

Questions to talk about with your child • Would you try green eggs and ham? If so, where would it be? In a box, with a fox, etc?

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• Why do you think Sam refused to stop asking his friend to try green eggs and ham? • Why do you think Sam's friend tried green eggs and ham? • What are the different types of transportation in the story? Can you count them all?

Fun things to do together • Make your own green eggs and ham. http://www.seussville.com/printables/geah_recipes.html • Identify the animals and colors in the story.

Book Skills Tell A Story (Narrative Skills) Repetitive phrases makes this story easy to remember. It has a great rhythm perfect for reading aloud. Make Sounds (Phonological Awareness) Dr. Seuss introduces many pairs of rhyming words such as box, fox, house, mouse, etc.

Gregory the Terrible Eater
Gregory, the Terrible Eater: Oversize Author: Mitchell Sharmat, Ariane Dewey Publisher: Scholastic Paperbacks (2009) Binding: Paperback, 32 pages

IllustratorJose Aruego & Ariane Dewey Item Call NumberE SHARM A very picky eater, Gregory the goat refuses the usual goat diet staples of shoes and tin cans in favor of fruits, vegetables, eggs, and orange juice. Food Pyramid Link: http://mypyramid.gov/preschoolers/index.html

Questions to talk about with your child • Why do Gregory's parents call him a terrible eater? • What did Gregory's parents want him to eat? What did Gregory want to eat? • What are some of your favorite foods? Are they healthy foods? • What are some foods that you don't like? • Do you like to try new foods? What are some new foods you have eaten lately? • What are some things that people eat when they are terrible eaters?

Fun things to do together • Cut pictures of foods from a magazine. Decide which ones are healthy foods and which ones are junk foods. • Look at the food pyramid and healthy lifestyle information for kids on this website with your child. • Take a copy of the food pyramid along on a trip to the grocery store. Have a scavenger hunt to find a food for each food group on the pyramid.

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• Have a "Gregory" night where everyone in the family tries a new food. • Plan a healthy meal for your family. Include something from every food group.

Book Skills Loves Books (Print Motivation) It is easy for children to relate to a picky eater like Gregory. Reading about characters like themselves will help children learn to love books. Use Books (Print Awareness) It is easy for children to relate to a picky eater like Gregory. Reading about characters like themselves will help children learn to love books.

Harold and the Purple Crayon
The Adventures of Harold and the Purple Crayon Author: Crockett Johnson Publisher: HarperCollins (1987) Binding: Hardcover, 256 pages

IllustratorCrockett Johnson Item Call NumberE JOHNS Harold goes for an adventurous walk in the moonlight with his purple crayon.

Questions to talk about with your child • Why do you think Harold chose to use a purple crayon and not another color? • Harold sometimes draws scary things, like dragons or falling - what scares you? Do you feel less scared if you draw them on paper? • What does the moon look like? Is it always the same? Does it change night to night?

Fun things to do together • Get a big purple crayon and a large sheet of paper and draw, draw, draw • Make up a story about your drawing. • Make a drawing using a different colored crayon - Does the story change? • Be brave and find an area where you child has permission to draw on the wall - explore different dimensions!

Book Skills Loves Books (Print Motivation) This simple story leaves a lot for the imagination of young children. Use Books (Print Awareness) The lines/drawings that Harold draws on the page so movement of the text and the story from left to right.

Harry the Dirty Dog

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Harry the Dirty Dog Author: Gene Zion, Margaret Bloy Graham Publisher: HarperCollins (1956) Binding: Hardcover, 32 pages

IllustratorMargaret Bloy Graham Item Call NumberE ZION Harry, an adorable white dog with black spots, loves his family but hates baths. Facing having to have a bath, he runs away and gets so dirty that he looks like a black dog with white spots. Series: No Roses for Harry (1958), Harry and the Lady Next Door (1960), Harry by the Sea (1965)

Questions to talk about with your child • Look at all of the animals in the pictures. Which ones would you like to have for a pet? Why or why not? • Does this story take place now or a long time ago? What do you think of the clothes people wear in the story? (Dad wears a suit, Mom wears a dress and apron, most of the adults wear hats). • How do vehicles and trains of today look different than those in the pictures? • What letter is on the roof of the doghouse in the backyard? What does it stand for? What other words can you think of that start with this letter?

Fun things to do together • Draw two pictures of Harry. Draw one as a white dog with black spots. On the second picture, put a small amount of glue on various parts of his body and sprinkle those areas with potting soil in order make Harry look dirty. • Pretend you are Harry and take turns playing hide and seek with a bath brush or sponge. • Visit the dog park or pet store. • Gather stuffed dogs and play dog groomer, veterinarian office or animal shelter. • Count how many dogs, cats, birds, children, etc. there are in the story.

Book Skills Loves Books (Print Motivation) Harry is such an engaging character that children will want to read the other 3 books about him. Tell A Story (Narrative Skills) This simple, but fun story has a clear sequence of events that children will easily be able to retell or act out.

Hattie and the Fox
Hattie and the Fox Author: Mem Fox Publisher: Simon & Schuster Children's Publishing (1987) Binding: Hardcover, 32 pages

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IllustratorPatricia Mullins

Item Call NumberE FOX Hattie, a big black hen, discovers a fox in the bushes, which creates varying reactions in the other barnyard animals.

Questions to talk about with your child • Does Hattie get scared? Have you ever been scared? • Do you think that the animals are answering kindly to Hattie? • Did the other animals learn a lesson from Hattie? • What is your favorite part of this story?

Fun things to do together • Re-read the story and make your voice sound like each animal would sound • How many different animal sounds can you make? • Tear up colored tissue paper and make your own pictures just like Patricia Mullins.

Book Skills Loves Books (Print Motivation) The predictable and repetitive plotline gives way to a surprising twist with a cow's loud "Moo!" that scares away the fox intruder and startles the formally complacent barnyard animals. Children will love the suspenseful description of each part of the fox as he is revealed, but will appreciate even more the raucous bellow of the cow. Tell A Story (Narrative Skills) The repetition of the animals' ho-hum responses to Hattie's increasing alarm at the creature in the bushes as well as the sequential nature of Hattie's description (a nose, then eyes, then ears, etc.) of this creature can make for an exciting story to tell.

Hi! Fly Guy
Fly Guy #1: Hi, Fly Guy! Theodor Seuss Geisel Honor Book (Awards)) Author: Tedd Arnold Publisher: Cartwheel Books (2005) Binding: Hardcover, 32 pages Item Call NumberE ARNOL cWhen Buzz captures a fly to enter in The Amazing Pet Show, his parents and the judges tell him that a fly cannot be a pet, but Fly Guy proves them wrong. Series includes: Fly High, Fly Guy! (2008), Hooray for Fly Guy! (2008), Shoo, Fly Guy! (2006), Super Fly Guy (2006), There was an Old Lady who Swallowed Fly Guy (2007)

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Questions to talk about with your child • What animals do you think of as pets? • What unusual pets do you see in the story? • What's the difference between a pet and a pest? • Why do you think Buzz's parents did not want him to have a pet fly?

Fun things to do together • Sing "Shoo Fly" with your child. • Read this story with "I Know an Old Lady who Swallowed a Fly" illustrated by Round, Westcott, or Karas. • Draw a picture of your pet - real or imaginary. What would it look like? What would it be? What would it eat? • Gather your stuffed animal friends and judge your own pet show.

Book Skills Loves Books (Print Motivation) This fun read contains a lot of simple vocabulary ideal for a beginning reader. Tell A Story (Narrative Skills) Written in short chapters, this story is easy to read and tell. Plus kids can demonstrate their knowledge of the difference between pet and pest.

How Are You Peeling?
How Are You Peeling? Author: Saxton Freymann, Joost Elffers Publisher: Arthur A. Levine Books (1999) Binding: Hardcover, 48 pages

IllustratorSaxton Freymann and Joost Elffers Item Call NumberE FREYM Brief text and photographs of carvings made from vegetables introduce the world of emotions by presenting leading questions such as "Are you feeling angry?"

Questions to talk about with your child • Have you ever felt some of these feelings? • Do you think other people have these feelings? • Do certain colors make you feel a certain way? • What is your favorite vegetable? Is it in the book?

Fun things to do together • Make your own vegetable or fruit sculpture to eat and take pictures • Draw different feelings you have had. • Talk about the different types of fruits and vegetables that are used in this book - be brave and try those you have never tasted before. • Tell a story about your feelings

Book Skills

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New Words (Vocabulary) Freymann and Elffers pair amusingly carved fruits and vegetables to accurately portray the wide range of feelings a person might encounter. Make Sounds (Phonological Awareness) The authors mix rhymes into the text at varying intervals, sometimes within the same line of text, sometimes rhyming every other line.

How Do Dinosaurs Say Good Night?
How Do Dinosaurs Say Goodnight? Author: Jane Yolen Publisher: Blue Sky Press (2000) Binding: Hardcover, 40 pages

IllustratorMark Teague Item Call NumberE YOLEN Parents and children ponder the different ways a dinosaur can say goodnight, from slamming his tail and pouting to giving a big hug and kiss in this comical look at dinosaurs behaving like children and imitating all the ways they try to avoid going to sleep at night. Series: How Do Dinosaurs Get Well Soon? (2003), How Do Dinosaurs Eat Their Food? (2005) How Do Dinosaurs Go to School? (2007)

Questions to talk about with your child • Which dinosaur in the story is your favorite? Why? • What is your bedtime routine? • Have you ever tried to keep from going to bed like one of the dinosaurs in the story? What did you do to keep from going to bed?

Fun things to do together • Find the name of the pictured dinosaur hidden in the artwork on the pages. • Many of the dinosaurs have teddy bears and some have pet cats or dogs. Find and count the teddy bears, cats, and dogs in the pictures. • Listen to and learn "We Are the Dinosaurs" by Laurie Berkner on her CD Whadd'ya Think of That? • Using colored construction paper, help your child make a capital "D", cut it out, and glue it to a white piece of construction paper with the "back" of the D parallel to the bottom of the paper. Using crayons, add a head, a tail, legs, scales and a background. Draw a scene around your dinosaur. Is he or she sleeping in the grass under a tree? Drinking from a lake? Walking with a baby dinosaur?

Book Skills Loves Books (Print Motivation) Children will relate to and laugh at this silly story about dinosaurs behaving badly about bedtime. Make Sounds (Phonological Awareness)

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The rhyme of this story helps children hear and play with the ending sounds of words. Use Books (Print Awareness) Looking for the hidden name of the dinosaur on each page draws the child's attention to the printed words.

I Ain't Gonna Paint No More
I Ain't Gonna Paint No More! (Ala Notable Children's Books. Younger Readers (Awards)) Author: Karen Beaumont Publisher: Harcourt Children's Books (2005) Binding: Hardcover, 32 pages IllustratorKaren Beaumont Item Call NumberE BEAU In the rhythm of a familiar folk song, a child cannot resist adding one more dab of paint in surprising places.

Questions to talk about with your child • What is your favorite part of the story? • What is your favorite color and why? • What color would you paint your stomach? Your hand? Your leg? • Do you think tWhat you would get in trouble if you were caught painting on yourself? • Do you like to paint pictures?

Fun things to do together • Name all the colors shown in the book. • Grab a paintbrush and pretend to paint yourself • Try singing along with the book. • Use the book to learn anatomy vocabulary (i.e. - arm, leg, neck) • Draw a picture of your child and let them paint their body parts.

Book Skills Loves Books (Print Motivation) This book is fun, energetic and engaging. Kids will love to sing along with the book. New Words (Vocabulary) With many body parts named, this book is great for learning all about you.

I Stink!
I Stink! Author: Kate Mcmullan Publisher: HarperCollins (2002) Binding: Hardcover, 40 pages

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IllustratorKate and Jim McMullan Item Call NumberE MCMUL Similar stories by Kate and Jim McMullan: I'm Dirty (backhoe), I'm Mighty (tugboat), and I'm Bad (dinosaur)

Questions to talk about with your child • In the story, the garbage truck tells us his alphabet soup recipe. What ingredients are the stinkiest? The most gross? • What new words did you read about? What do you think "dual op" means? • Inside the book cover is a map of the garbage truck's city. Where else do you think the truck goes? What buildings do you see?

Fun things to do together • The story even explains how the trash system works in a simple way (truck picks up garbage, compacts it, and transports it via the river to a garbage dump). Take the trash or recycling out together. Discuss why garbage trucks are important. • Visit Kate McMullan's website and try out these fun activities: http://www.katemcmullan.com/ActivityPages/PictureBooks.pdf • Read more about garbage collectors and trucks at the Lexington Public Library. • Design your own garbage truck with items from your recycling bin.

Book Skills Loves Books (Print Motivation) The print size and location on the page in this title indicates motion and size. Word placement assists with the reader's attitude and helps provide personality for the garbage truck. New Words (Vocabulary) The author includes items that always grab kids' attention - dirty diapers and puppy poo. See Letters (Letter Knowledge) McMullan includes a unique alphabet and teaches different letter sounds and words beginning with those letters.

In a Small, Small Pond
In the Small, Small Pond Author: Denise Fleming Publisher: Henry Holt and Co. BYR Paperbacks (2007) Binding: Paperback, 32 pages

IllustratorDenise Fleming Item Call NumberE FLEMI Illustrations and rhyming text describe the activities of animals living in and near a small pond as spring progresses to autumn. Denise Fleming Link : www.denisefleming.com

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Questions to talk about with your child • Can you find the frog that is on every page in the story? • Do you think the animals make different sounds than what the author wrote down? • What is your favorite part of this story?

Fun things to do together • Make a list of the animals in the book and choose one to learn more about. • Try making your own pond, either in real life or through art. • Write your own rhyme about something that is outside. • Learn how to make your own paper and make your own Denise Flemingesque art. (Denise Fleming created the illustrations by pouring colored cotton pulp through her hand-cut stencils.) • Visit www.denisefleming.com for further details and activities

Book Skills New Words (Vocabulary) This story introduces great examples of synonyms, nouns and verbs like minnows, dip, wiggle and jiggle. See Letters (Letter Knowledge) The large and dramatic font in this book helps to attract children to the text. It also makes it easy to recognize the flow of the words.

King Bidgood's in the Bathtub
King Bidgood's in the Bathtub Author: Audrey Wood Publisher: Harcourt Children's Books (1985) Binding: Hardcover, 32 pages

IllustratorAudrey Wood Item Call NumberE WOOD Despite pleas from his court, a fun-loving king refuses to get out of his bathtub to rule his kingdom in this Caldecott Honor book.

Questions to talk about with your child • Which of the King's bathtime fun activities was your favorite? • How long is King Bidgood in the bathtub? What parts of the story tell you how much time passes? • What else could the king do in the bathtub to have fun? • How does the young page finally figure out how to get King Bidgood out of the bathtub? • Do you have a favorite bathtime toy or game? What do you like to play during bathtime?

Fun things to do together • Blow bubbles together during the bathtub scenes.

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• Read the story during bathtime and follow it with the song "Bathtime"by Raffi from his Everything Grows CD. • Recite the nursery rhymes Old King Cole and Rub-A-Dub-Dub Three Men in a Tub.

Book Skills Tell A Story (Narrative Skills) The repeated phrases will inspire children to join in and aid them in retelling the story in sequence. Make Sounds (Phonological Awareness) The sound effects are fun and expressive to read, like "boom, boom, boom" and "glub, glub, glub" and they encourage children to listen to the smaller sounds within the words and repeat them with you.

Lilly's Purple Plastic Purse
Lilly's Purple Plastic Purse Author: Kevin Henkes Publisher: Greenwillow Books (1996) Binding: Hardcover, 32 pages

IllustratorKevin Henkes Item Call NumberE HENKE Lilly loves everything about school, especially her teacher, but when he asks her to wait a while before showing her new purse, she does something for which she is sorry later.

Questions to talk about with your child • Why was Lilly so upset with her teacher? • What do you do when you get upset? • What do you want to be when you grow up? • What color is Lilly's purse? What is your favorite color?

Fun things to do together • Mix different colors and see what makes the color purple. • Have a special story time with books about mice and have some type of "cheesy" snack. • Look through magazines and find purple objects.

Book Skills Loves Books (Print Motivation) Colorful and varied illustrations keep the reader engaged. New Words (Vocabulary) Glittery, jingly, fiercely, furious are examples of out of the ordinary vocabulary. Tell A Story (Narrative Skills)

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A child's point of view makes this an engaging story.

Little Bear
Little Bear (Anniversary Edition) Author: Else Holmelund Minarik Publisher: HarperCollins (1957) Binding: Library Binding, 64 pages

IllustratorElse Holmelund Minarik Item Call NumberE MINAR Little Bear's four adventures include taking a trip to the moon and having a birthday party Series: Father Bear Comes Home (1959), Little Bear's Friend (1960), Little Bear's Visit (1961), A Kiss for Little Bear (1968), Adventures of Little Bear (1990)

Questions to talk about with your child • What is your favorite part of this story? • What wishes do you have? • What do you remember about your last birthday? What are you looking forward to at your next birthday? • If you had friends that were animals, what animals would they be?

Fun things to do together • Find a box and pretend that you are going to fly to the moon • Create your own birthday soup • Make up your own Little Bear story and use some of your stuffed animals as characters

Book Skills Loves Books (Print Motivation) Children will be interested in and identify with Little Bear's experiences as he invites friends over for his birthday, enjoys an imaginative trip to the moon, and asks his mother for a story at bedtime. Tell A Story (Narrative Skills) The four little connected stories in this book are perfect examples of simple story structure and rereading and retelling the stories of Little Bear (with or without props) will help children understand basic story structure.

Make Way for Ducklings
Make Way for Ducklings (Viking Kestrel picture books) Author: Robert McCloskey Publisher: Viking Juvenile (1941) Binding: Hardcover, 68 pages

IllustratorRobert McCloskey

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Item Call NumberE MCCLO Mr. and Mrs. Mallard find the perfect home to raise their ducklings in Boston's beautiful Public Garden

Questions to talk about with your child • Once the ducklings became good swimmers, Mr. & Mrs. Mallard moved them to their new home in the Public Garden? Have you ever had to move to a new home? • Why did Mrs. Mallard think that the public garden would be a good place to live? What are some good things about where you live? • How did Michael the policeman help the Mallard family? How do the police help people in your neighborhood?

Fun things to do together • Re-read the story and let the child make all of the duck and traffic sounds. Be sure to point to sound words (honk!, quack! etc.) on the page to reinforce print awareness. • Make a large-scale, simplified map of the streets, St. Charles River, Public Garden, buildings, etc. Retell the story and retrace the ducks route to their new home. • The ducklings are named in alphabetical order - Jack, Kack, Lack, Mack, Nack, Ouack, Pack and Quack. Talk about what alphabetical order means. Say and talk about the words with emphasis on how the different beginning letters look and sound and how they make each word different. • Visit a local park or Lexington Cemetery and feed the ducks.

Book Skills Make Sounds (Phonological Awareness) Be sure to use your finger to point to the sound effects in the story. Children will love to honk, quack, and tweet. See Letters (Letter Knowledge) The names of the ducklings give children the perfect opportunity to play with changing the first letter of the name to create all of different ones.

Mike Mulligan and His Steam Shovel
Image of Mike Mulligan and His Steam Shovel

Mike Mulligan and His Steam Shovel Author: Virginia Lee Burton Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Books for Children (1939) Binding: Hardcover, 48 pages

IllustratorVirginia Burton Item Call NumberE BURTO Mike Mulligan proves that, although dated, his steam shovel is still useful.

Questions to talk about with your child • Who were the different community helpers who watched Mike and Mary Anne work? • Why were Mike and Mary Anne sad?

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• Why did people watching make the workers work faster? • What did Mary Anne become when she finished the hole? • How are the machines in the book different from today's machines?

Fun things to do together • Visit the library and find books on different types of earth movers, bulldozers, & other big machines. • Make a simple steam shovel with brads and poster board. • Visit a construction site. Who and what do you see there? • What would your favorite big machine look like? Half dumpster/ half bulldozer? Or maybe a crane with a dump truck? • While boiling water for tea or dinner, discuss the steam coming from the pot. If the steam is blocked, it converts to water, but if not evaporates into the air.

Book Skills Loves Books (Print Motivation) The story and colorful pictures will encourage kids to read. New Words (Vocabulary) The end papers have a list of words that define all the parts of a steam shovel.

Millions of Cats
Millions of Cats Author: Wanda Gag Publisher: Putnam Juvenile (1952) Binding: Hardcover, pages IllustratorWanda Gag Item Call NumberE GAG How can an old man and his wife select one cat from a choice of millions?

Questions to talk about with your child • Do you think there would be such a place filled with so many cats? • What color cat would you have picked? • Do you think the little kitten was happy living with the old man and his wife? • What happened when all the cats ate and drank? • What do you notice about the colors in the book? • How do you think the cat felt about being the only one left?

Fun things to do together • Sing some songs and nursery rhymes involving cats such as "Three Little Kittes" or "Pussycat, Pussycat". • Act out the story using stuffed animal toys. • Draw a picture of a cat that would be the prefect one for the family. • Cut cat pictures out of magazines and sort by color, size, stripes and spots

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• Visit an animal shelter and bring a donation of food or litter when you visit.

Book Skills Loves Books (Print Motivation) The small size of the book encourages small hands to hold it and the woodcut illustrations clearly show contrasts for young eyes. Tell A Story (Narrative Skills) This is a story with a clear beginning, middle and end. Make Sounds (Phonological Awareness) The repetition and rhyming of some phrases.

Mother, Mother I Want Another
Mother, Mother, I Want Another Author: Maria Polushkin Robbins Publisher: Knopf Books for Young Readers (2005) Binding: Hardcover, 32 pages

IllustratorJon Goddell Item Call NumberE ROBBI In this newly illustrated edition, Mrs. Mouse is anxious to get her son to sleep and goes off to find what she thinks he wants.

Questions to talk about with your child • What was your favorite part of the story? • What special things do you need before you go to bed? • What animal mommy would you want to be your mommy? Why? • What do you think about the little songs made up by the animal mommies? • What do you do every night before bedtime?

Fun things to do together • Make up your own "Good Night" song. • Lay out your stuffed animal friends and re-enact the story. • Make a kiss coupon book out of construction paper. • Get chocolate kiss candies and have a kiss candy hunt with a real giant "kiss" at the end. • Get different varieties of chocolate kisses and count and sort them by package color and package pattern. • Make up different types of kiss sounds: duck kisses, cow kisses, little kisses, big kisses, fish kisses, etc.

Book Skills Tell A Story (Narrative Skills) This story can be become part of your nightly bedtime routine by asking your child of they would like another... Mother? Make Sounds (Phonological Awareness)

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Children love the silly little songs that the Mothers sing to Mouse. Have your child make up their own bedtime song.

My Kindergarten
My Kindergarten (Booklist Editor's Choice. Books for Youth (Awards)) Author: Rosemary Wells Publisher: Hyperion Book CH (2004) Binding: Hardcover, 96 pages IllustratorRosemary Wells Item Call NumberE WELLS Just like a true Kindergarten year, Rosemary Wells' My Kindergarten is full of fun and learning. It follows the year of a Kindergarten class and all of the amazing things they do and learn.

Questions to talk about with your child • How did you feel on your first day of Kindergarten? What did you do? • What is your favorite part of Kindergarten? • Would you like to have Miss Cribbage as a teacher? What are some fun things that she does with her class? • What is something new that you have learned in Kindergarten?

Fun things to do together • Look at the different patterns on your clothing. Make a book of patterns. • Look at stamps from other countries at this website: http://www.bnaps.org/stamps4kids/world.htm. Design your own stamps for different countries of the world. • Get a book of poetry and read a short poem. • Make "What's-It-Made-Of? Boxes for animals, vegetables, and minerals and collect things from around your house to put in them. • Measure the feet of everyone in your family. Whose are the longest? Whose are the shortest?

Book Skills Loves Books (Print Motivation) From stories to songs, from maps to games there is something for everyone in this story about the kindergarten experience. Books that appeal to children on many levels are valuable tools in teaching children to love to read. See Letters (Letter Knowledge) The pages of this book are filled with bright, colorful letters. Help your children see letters by having them point them out or make their sounds as you read the book.

Pete's a Pizza
Pete's a Pizza Author: William Steig

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Publisher: HarperCollins (1998) Binding: Library Binding, 32 pages

IllustratorWilliam Steig Item Call NumberE STEIG What do you do when Pete's in a bad mood? When it is raining and he cannot go out and play? Turn him into a pizza, of course!

Questions to talk about with your child • What do you like to do on rainy days when you can't go outside? • Do you like to pretend to be something else? What do you like to pretend to be? • What are your favorite pizza toppings? What could you use for those toppings if you were making a pretend pizza like Pete's father? • What do people do to cheer you up when you are in a bad mood? • What steps do you go through to make a pizza?

Fun things to do together • Make your child into a pizza like Pete. Try other foods, too, like hot dogs and tacos. Let them do it to you or a stuffed animal. • Brainstorm for ideas for rainy day activities. Put them all in a Rainy Day Box and draw out an activity on the next rainy day. • Make a pretend pizza from construction paper. Have your child tear out the shapes for the toppings and glue them on. Fine motor exercises like these are excellent ways to prepare your child for handwriting and scissor skills. • Let your child help you make a real pizza. Have them measure the ingredients. • Introduce fractions by having your child help you divide a pizza into equal pieces.

Book Skills Loves Books (Print Motivation) This story captures the joy of a silly family ritual. Books that celebrate these moments in children's lives are natural teachers of the love of books. Tell A Story (Narrative Skills) The story of Pete and his father making rainy day fun is easy and fun to recreate at home. By recreating stories, children learn to describe events and tell stories.

Sheep in a Jeep
Sheep in a Jeep Author: Nancy E. Shaw Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Books for Children (1986) Binding: Hardcover, 32 pages

IllustratorMargot Apple

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Item Call NumberE SHAW Records the misadventures of a group of sheep that go riding in a jeep. Series: Sheep on a Ship (1989), Sheep in a Shop (1991), Sheep Out to Eat (1992), Sheep Take a Hike (1994), Sheep Trick or Treat (1997), Sheep Blast Off (2008).

Questions to talk about with your child • Where do you think the sheep are going in their jeep? • What are words in the book that rhyme? • What do the sheep do with their jeep when it crashes? Do you think anyone will buy it? Why or why not? • Do you think the sheep will be better drivers next time? Why? • What do you think would have happened if the pigs hadn't helped the sheep?

Fun things to do together • Have your child pretend to be a sheep in a jeep by sitting in a laundry basket and pretending to steer. Add a kinesthetic element to the story by tugging them out of a pretend mud puddle and crashing them into a pile of pillows. • Use letter magnets to make rhyming words. • Have your child make an advertisement trying to sell the sheep's wrecked jeep. Help them think of words to describe the jeep? • Make sheep by gluing cottonballs onto construction paper.

Book Skills New Words (Vocabulary) The fun, rhyming language of Sheep in a Jeep encourages children to make sounds and hear the smaller sounds within words. Make Sounds (Phonological Awareness) The fun, rhyming language of Sheep in a Jeep encourages children to make sounds and hear the smaller sounds within words.

Snowballs
Image of Snowballs

Snowballs Author: Lois Ehlert Publisher: Harcourt Children's Books (1995) Binding: Hardcover, 40 pages

IllustratorLois Ehlert Item Call NumberE EHLER Some children create a family out of snow. Includes labeled pictures of all the items they use, as well as information about how snow is formed.

Questions to talk about with your child • Which snowperson was your favorite and why? • Have you ever made a snowman? If so, what kind of things did you use to dress it up? • What is your favorite season?

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• Why did the snow people melt?

Fun things to do together • Make snowmen using white construction paper and various things from around the house. • Use the back page of the book as a quiz to test your child's memory of which snowman had what on him. • Make birdfeeders for your backyard using peanut butter and pinecones with birdseed. • Sing "Frosty the Snowman." • Turn the book into an "I Spy" game for each page.

Book Skills Loves Books (Print Motivation) Since the snowmen are made out of so many pieces, this book will want to be read over and over to find them all. New Words (Vocabulary) While reading the book, point out all the different materials used. On the end pages, there are labeled pictures of everything.

Spicy Hot Colors / Colores Picantes
Spicy Hot Colors: Colores Picantes Author: Sherry Shahan Publisher: August House (2004) Binding: Hardcover, 24 pages

IllustratorPaula Barragán Item Call NumberE SHAHA Jazzy poetry, dancing skeletons, walking iguanas, musical sounds, and popping firecrackers all gather to introduce nine colors through onomatopoeia and alliteration in English and in Spanish.

Questions to talk about with your child • Which colors do you like the best? • Can corn be green, or does it have to be yellow? Can skeletons be purple or do they have to be white? • What colors are spicy? What colors are cool? What colors are hot?

Fun things to do together • Find some items around the house and make up with different sounds that they might make - (shimmy-shammy-slunk might be the sound of water as it goes down the drain). • Ms. Barragán, the illustrator, is from Ecuador. Where is Ecuador? Can you find it on a map? • Use bold-colored crayons, paint, and/or bold-colored construction paper with black paper to make your own Barragán-esque art. • Make up a song using the funny words in this book.

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• Dance and march to the rhythm of this book.

Book Skills Tell A Story (Narrative Skills) The story introduces not only new words in Spanish for colors, but also likely unfamiliar English nouns like iguana, cilantro, and castanets as well as fun and unusual adjectives like "spitter-sputter "and verbs like "slither" and "swivel." Make Sounds (Phonological Awareness) The onomatopoeia (sound words) and alliteration (words with the same beginning sounds) like "drip-drop" and "flitter-flutter " provide ample exploration and play with sound.

Strega Nona
Strega Nona (Caldecott Honor Books) Author: Tomie dePaola Publisher: Simon & Schuster Children's Publishing (1975) Binding: Hardcover, 32 pages

IllustratorTomie de Paola Item Call NumberE DEPAO When Strega Nona leaves him alone with her magic pasta pot, Big Anthony's deceitful decision to show the townspeople how it works gets him into trouble in this Caldecott Honor book.

Questions to talk about with your child • What does the name Strega Nona mean? • What does Strega Nona tell Big Anthony he must never do? • What does the magic pot do when you recite the magic words? • How does Big Anthony get into trouble? • Have you ever done something that you were told not to do?

Fun things to do together • Put on a pot of pasta together, and over the pot, recite Strega Nona's magic words, "Bubble, bubble, pasta pot?" • Make your own magic pasta pot; take an empty butter tub or some other empty plastic container and cut lots and lots of yellow yarn for pasta. Put it on paper plates when it's "done" and serve it to the family. • In this story, blowing three kisses is a magic command to stop the pot. For an entire day, blow three kisses to each other to say "Please" and "Thank You."

Book Skills New Words (Vocabulary) Knowing the names of things. This story presents opportunities to discuss the meanings of some unusual words and phrases, for example: convent, town square, grazie, applause, barricade, and sputter. Tell A Story (Narrative Skills)

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The ability to describe things and events and tell stories. With repeated readings, children can recall the events of the story in sequence and describe what goes wrong when Anthony forgets the magic kisses. Make Sounds (Phonological Awareness) Strega Nona's rhyming magic chants are fun to say and memorize.

Swimmy
Swimmy Author: Leo Lionni Publisher: Knopf Books for Young Readers (1963) Binding: Library Binding, 32 pages

IllustratorLeo Lionni Item Call NumberE LIONN This is the story of a clever little fish named Swimmy. When his brothers and sisters are eaten by a big fish, he teaches his friends to work together to stay safe and free to explore the ocean in all its beauty.

Questions to talk about with your child • How did Swimmy feel when he escaped from the tuna and swam all alone in the sea? • What helped Swimmy feel happy again? What things make you feel happy? • What did Swimmy do to help the fish not be afraid? • What part of the big fish did Swimmy pretend to be? • How many red fish work together to make one big fish? • If you could live in the ocean, what would you want to be? Why?

Fun things to do together • Cut several red fish shapes and a black one out of construction paper. Use various lengths of fishing line or string to suspend the fish from a coat hanger to create a mobile. • Cut a variety of sea creatures/plants/treasure chest out of different colored construction paper. Attach a paper clip. Use string and a stick to create a fishing pole and tie a magnet to the end of the string. Go fishing. • Visit a pet store and find out about all the different kinds of fish they have. • Cut a large fish pattern out of two pieces of cellophane or construction paper and punch holes all around the edge. Stuff with small pieces of shiny paper and sew together with yarn.

Book Skills New Words (Vocabulary) Beautiful and poetic language is used to create a mood & learn new words such as "medusa, marvel & sea anemone". Tell A Story (Narrative Skills)

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Children will quickly understand and be able to explain how Swimmy's idea of working together kept them safe.

Tacky the Penguin
Tacky the Penguin Author: Helen Lester Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Books for Children (1988) Binding: Hardcover, 32 pages

IllustratorLynn Munsinger Item Call NumberE LESTE Tacky the penguin does not fit in with his sleek and graceful companions, but his odd behavior comes in handy when hunters come with maps and traps. Series: Three Cheers for Tacky (1994), Tacky in Trouble (1998), Tacky and the Emperor (2000), Tacky and the Winter Games (2005)

Questions to talk about with your child • What would you do if you lived in a "nice icy land" like Tacky? How would you build a snowman? What would happen if you had a snowball fight? etc. • If you could be any of the characters in the story, who would you want to be? Why? • Why did all of the penguins except Tacky run away and hide when the hunters came? • What do you do when you are scared? • What is the bravest thing you have done? • How do you help your friends?

Fun things to do together • Practice marching in straight lines like Goodly, Lovely, Angel, Neatly and Perfect. Then march in a totally made up way like Tacky. • Make up a silly song like Tacky did and sing it to the melody of a well known song. • Use markers to draw a winter or Antarctic scene. When the drawing is finished and dry, use a damp sponge and go over the paper lightly. Use a shaker to gently shake salt over the picture. When the salt touches the paper, it will crystallize and look like snowflakes. • Find Antarctica on a globe or map. Use the library to find which animals live in the Arctic and Antarctic.

Book Skills Loves Books (Print Motivation) In Tacky, children find a character that they immediately identify with and love. Tell A Story (Narrative Skills) Children will love acting out all of the things that Tacky does differently than his friends.

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The Little Engine That Could
The Little Engine That Could Author: Watty Piper Publisher: Philomel (2005) Binding: Hardcover, 48 pages

IllustratorLoren Long Item Call NumberE PIPER Although she is not very big, the Little Blue Engine agrees to try to pull a stranded train full of toys over the mountain.

Questions to talk about with your child • Can you think of something you have done that you thought would be difficult? • Why won't the other engines help the train full of toys? • Why did the Little Blue Engine help the train full of toys? What would you have done if they had asked you for help? • How are you similar to the Little Blue Engine? How are you different?

Fun things to do together • Make a train using the chairs from your kitchen table. What will your train carry? Where is it going? • Make shakers from dried beans and paper cups. See if you can imitate the rhythm of a train. • Make rectangular train cars. Write a letter of your child's name on each car. Help your child put the cars in the right order to spell his or her name. • Make a Marshmallow Train Snack. Use large marshmallows for the cars and pretzel sticks to connect them. Use peanut butter to stick on Cheerios for wheels.

Book Skills Loves Books (Print Motivation) Being interested in and enjoying books. Time-tested stories like this story about the persistent little engine have helped generations of children to learn to love books. Tell A Story (Narrative Skills) Being able to describe things and events and tell stories. The repetitive and predictable pattern of The Little Engine That Could helps to teach children a natural and ancient structure for telling stories.

The Neighborhood Mother Goose
The Neighborhood Mother Goose Author: Nina Crews Publisher: Greenwillow Books (2004) Binding: Library Binding, 64 pages

IllustratorNina Crews

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Item Call NumberE CREWS This is a wonderful treasury of nursery rhymes illustrated with collage photographs of contemporary urban cities and multicultural children

Questions to talk about with your child • What is your favorite rhyme? Can you say it by heart? (A child that knows 8 nursery rhymes by the age of 4 will be a good reader by the age of 8). • What letter does your name start with? Can you find that letter on the pages with the A Was an Apple Pie rhyme? If you could have a garden like Mary, what would you grow? • Would you like to live in a shoe? Why or why not?

Fun things to do together • Say three words. Ask your child to put a thumb up if the words rhyme and thumbs down if they don't. For example, cat, hat, bat and run, fun, play. • Read some of your child's favorite rhymes again. Ask your child to clap when hearing a rhyming word. • Say a silly sentence with a missing word. Ask your child to use rhyming clues to figure out the missing word. For example, "I saw a bear combing his _____(hair)". • Plant an indoor flower or vegetable garden in paper cups. • After discussing living in a shoe, ask your child what his or her dream house would look like. Ask them to draw a picture of the house.

Book Skills Loves Books (Print Motivation) With its photographs of multicultural children, this collection will be popular with children because it reflects their world. Make Sounds (Phonological Awareness) Fun words & phrases like "Wee Willie Winkie" and "Diddle Diddle Dumpling" invite children to play with language.

The Snowy Day
The Snowy Day Author: Ezra Jack Keats Publisher: Viking Juvenile (1962) Binding: Hardcover, 32 pages

IllustratorJack Ezra Keats Item Call NumberE KEATS The adventures of a little boy in the city on a very snowy day

Questions to talk about with your child • What activities does Peter do in the snow? • Why was the snowball in Peter's pocket gone when looked for it later in the story? • Describe how snow feels and what it looks like.

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• What activities do you enjoy doing in the snow?

Fun things to do together • Put on a hat and mittens and make hot chocolate before reading the story. • Sing "Walking in a Winter Wonderland" and "Frosty the Snowman" together. • Pretend to walk in the snow (or actually walk in the snow) as Peter does with your toes pointing both in and out. • Make snowballs from crumpled plastic grocery bags and have a snowball fight.

Book Skills Tell A Story (Narrative Skills) Peter's snow adventure takes place over a specifically defined period beginning with his waking discovery of a snowy morning into the next morning. This straight forward time line and his simply detailed experiences with the snow make this story a good choice for describing events and telling about them in sequence. Use Books (Print Awareness) Words and sentence structures are used in conjunction with illustrations to highlight details of the story - how Peter walks in the snow toes in and then toes out and the snow falling on his head with a plop - drawing attention to the words on the page.

The Tale of Peter Rabbit
Image of The Tale of Peter Rabbit (Potter)

The Tale of Peter Rabbit (Potter) Author: Beatrix Potter Publisher: Warne (2002) Binding: Hardcover, 70 pages

IllustratorBeatrix Potter Item Call NumberE POTTE Naughty Peter Rabbit disobeys his mother by going into Mr. McGregor's garden and almost gets caught.

Questions to talk about with your child • How many rabbits were in the story? How many little rabbits? • What were their names? • Who did the garden belong to? • What color was Peter's coat? • What did Peter lose in the garden? What happened to them? • What did Peter eat to make his tummy feel better?

Fun things to do together • Visit a pet store and look at the rabbits. Discuss which one looks the most like Peter and his family. • Visit the grocery and try to find all the vegetables that Peter ate.

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• Hop like a bunny and twitch your nose. Act out the story. • Make a simple rabbit puppet using a paper bag and construction paper.

Book Skills Loves Books (Print Motivation) This classic story has comfort, adventure and a happy ending that keeps the reader interested. New Words (Vocabulary) Children are introduced to the names of many vegetables and gardening tools in the story. Tell A Story (Narrative Skills) Potter's title is a simple story with a great conclusion.

The Ugly Duckling
The Ugly Duckling Author: Hans Christian Andersen, Jerry Pinkney Publisher: HarperCollins (1999) Binding: Library Binding, 40 pages

IllustratorJerry Pinkney Item Call NumberE ANDER An ugly duckling spends an unhappy year ostracized by the other animals before he grows into a beautiful swan.

Questions to talk about with your child • Did the other animals in this book do anything that made them ugly? • How did the duckling feel when the other animals teased him? Have you ever felt that way? What happened that made you feel that way? • Was there anyone in the story who was kind to the duckling? • How do you think the Ugly Duckling's egg got in the mother duck's nest? • What seasons were shown in the story? How could you recognize them?

Fun things to do together • Curl up in a ball on the floor and pretend to be a duckling hatching from an egg. • Make up your own fairy tale like Hans Christian Anderson. Make one of your stuffed animals the main character. • Make animals sounds for all of the different animals the Ugly Duckling meets. • Draw a picture of your favorite scene in the book. • Look at pictures of different kinds of eggs. Talk about what kinds of birds you think might come out of the eggs.

Book Skills Loves Books (Print Motivation) This version of The Ugly Duckling has large and detailed illustrations. Children will love looking at the small details in each picture. Tell A Story (Narrative Skills)

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Classic stories like The Ugly Duckling teach children the framework for telling stories.

The Very Hungry Caterpillar
Image of The Very Hungry Caterpillar

The Very Hungry Caterpillar Author: Eric Carle Publisher: Philomel (1981) Binding: Hardcover, 32 pages

IllustratorEric Carle Item Call NumberE CARLE This story follows the progress of a hungry little caterpillar as he eats his way through a varied and very large quantity of food until, full at last, he forms a cocoon around himself, goes to sleep, and emerges from his sleepy cocoon a beautiful butterfly.

Questions to talk about with your child • What are the days of the week? • What does the caterpillar eat on each day? • How many items does the caterpillar eat on each day? • What happens to the caterpillar after he goes to sleep in his cocoon? • What are your favorite fruits and foods?

Fun things to do together • Use a calendar and record the foods eaten on each day in the story or make your own calendar and do the same • Using a magazine, cut out pictures of the same foods in the story use them to glue a healthy meal to a paper plate • Watch a child's educational film, like a Magic School Bus video or DVD, about the life cycle of a caterpillar

Book Skills New Words (Vocabulary) This story offers practice with the words for the days of the week and a variety of common foods. Tell A Story (Narrative Skills) The cumulative structure of this story - what the caterpillar eats on each passing day and the simple progressive details of his life cycle - are ideal for practice in describing simple events and recounting details of a story.

There Was an Old Lady Who Swallowed a Fly
There Was an Old Lady Who Swallowed a Fly (Caldecott Honor Book) Author: Simms Taback Publisher: Viking Juvenile (1997) Binding: Hardcover, 32 pages

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IllustratorSimms Taback Item Call NumberE TABAC Everyone knows the song about the old lady who swallowed a fly, a spider, a bird, and even worse, but who's ever seen what's going on inside the old lady's stomach? With this inventive die-cut artwork, Simms Tabak gives us a rollicking, eye-popping version of the well-loved poem.

Questions to talk about with your child • Why do you think the old lady swallowed a fly? Could it have been an accident? • What was the reaction of the cow? What about the bird, dog, and cat? • Have you ever swallowed something strange that you would not normally eat? • Who is the man at the end of the story? What is his reaction to the old lady's death?

Fun things to do together • Make a food chain. What might the cat really eat? The fly? The spider and the bird? • Write the names and/or draw a picture of the various animals eaten by the old lady on a small piece of paper. Put them in sequential order. • On a paper plate, draw your face and cut a small slit for your mouth. Using clip art or pictures from magazines, cut out pictures of "yummy" foods you'd like to eat. Slip them into your "mouth" to eat them.

Book Skills Loves Books (Print Motivation) This title is a silly, funny, classic tale (or song) and children will laugh at the ridiculousness of the plot as well as the humor of the rhymes. The bright, detailed illustrations and the growing hole (an actual hole) in the old lady's stomach with the turn of each page will also inspire children to get up close to the book for a better look at each reading. Tell A Story (Narrative Skills) Being able to describe things and events and tell stories. The cumulative structure (the fly, the spider, the bird, etc.) and the repeated phrases will inspire children to join in and encourage them to retell the story in sequence. Make Sounds (Phonological Awareness) Being able to hear and play with the smaller sounds in words. This title has a very infectious rhyme and rhythm which is very often enjoyed as a song and encourages children to play with the ending sounds of words.

Three Billy Goats Gruff
The Three Billy Goats Gruff Author: Paul Galdone Publisher: Clarion Books (1979) Binding: Hardcover, 32 pages

IllustratorPaul Galdone Item Call NumberE GALDO

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Three clever billy goats outwit a big ugly troll that lives under the bridge they must cross on their way up the mountain.

Questions to talk about with your child • Why do you think the troll will not allow the goats to cross over the bridge? • What word rhymes with the word goat? (coat, wrote, note, vote) • What else is living in the river? • What is different about each of the goats? (size, colors, horns) • Why is it that the Big Bill Goat Gruff wasn't afraid?

Fun things to do together • Count the goats together. Which goat arrived first? Second? Third? • Borrow a book about goats from the library and learn more about their habits. • Talk about small, medium, and large sizes. Gather items from around the house and identify their sizes. • Go on a letter walk and list things begin with the letter "g". • Use wooden spoons, blocks, or sticks to make the "trip trap" sound in the book. • Make a bridge from household items - paper cups, blocks, playing cards how can you make it stronger?

Book Skills Loves Books (Print Motivation) This is a fun book to read. It has great sound effects, a slightly scary troll, and satisfying ending to make everyone happy. Tell A Story (Narrative Skills) Since this story has strong repetition and a distinct beginning, middle, and end, it is an easy story to act out.

Where the Wild Things Are
Image of Where the Wild Things Are

Where the Wild Things Are Author: Maurice Sendak Publisher: Harper Collins (1988) Binding: Hardcover, 48 pages

IllustratorMaurice Sendak Item Call NumberE SENDAK A naughty little boy, sent to bed without his supper, sails to the land of the wild things where he becomes their king.

Questions to talk about with your child • What happened to Max when he disobeyed his mother? • How are the wild things the same? How are they different? • Why do you think some of the pictures are very small? Why do you think some pictures are so big? What is special about the pages with big pictures? • Why does Max sail back home?

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• Why is his supper still hot?

Fun things to do together • Design your own mask for the wild rumpus. • Max's imagination created a whole new world. Use your imagination and draw an imaginary world all of your own. How would you travel in this world? What would you wear? • Design your own monster paper plate mask. • Look at the wild things carefully. They are all so different. Some of them have horns or claws. Others have hair or feathers, toe nails or bird beaks. Draw yourself as a "Wild Thing." • Max tames the Wild Things by staring into their yellow eyes without blinking. Get a clock or a watch and time how long you can go without blinking.

Book Skills New Words (Vocabulary) Children love silly sounding and made-up words. Maurice Sendak included complex words like mischief, terrible, gnashed, and rumpus. Tell A Story (Narrative Skills) Max's imaginative journey to the land of the Wild Things is structured as a simple, linear story which will encourage children to retell it in their own words. The wordless pictures will allow them to add their own details to the story of the rumpus.

Wolf's Chicken Stew
The wolf's chicken stew (Soar to success) Author: Keiko Kasza Publisher: Houghton Mifflin (1999) Binding: Paperback, 32 pages IllustratorKeiko Kasza Item Call NumberE KASZA A hungry wolf's attempts to fatten a chicken for his stewpot have unexpected results.What foods did the wolf take to the chicken's house and why did he take them to her?

Questions to talk about with your child • What foods did the wolf take to the chicken's house and why did he take them to her? • What meal did the wolf want to make with the chicken? What is a stew? • The wolf gets a big surprise. What is it? • At the end of the story, what does the wolf want to do for the Baby Chicks?

Fun things to do together • Chose one of the foods mentioned in the story, chose a simple recipe, and cook it together.

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| Lexington, Kentucky

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• Examine the page that shows the wolf cooking in his kitchen and show your child those tools and ingredients in your own kitchen and talk about how you use them. • Use a silly, expressive voice for the wolf when reading the story.

Book Skills New Words (Vocabulary) Interesting and expressive words like stew and scrumptious are introduced. Tell A Story (Narrative Skills) Children can recount the order of the foods that Wolf cooks for Mrs. Chicken, talk about why and describe the final result of the wolf's efforts thanks to the straight -forward progression of the story's events.

Wolf's Chicken Stew
The Wolf's Chicken Stew Author: Keiko Kasza Publisher: Putnam Juvenile (1987) Binding: Hardcover, 32 pages

IllustratorKeiko Kasza Item Call NumberE KASZA A hungry wolf's attempts to fatten a chicken for his stewpot have unexpected results.

Questions to talk about with your child • What foods did the wolf take to the chicken's house and why did he take them to her? • What meal did the wolf want to make with the chicken? What is a stew? • The wolf gets a big surprise. What is it? • At the end of the story, what does the wolf want to do for the Baby Chicks?

Fun things to do together • Chose one of the foods mentioned in the story, chose a simple recipe, and cook it together. • Examine the page that shows the wolf cooking in his kitchen and show your child those tools and ingredients in your own kitchen and talk about how you use them. • Use a silly, expressive voice for the wolf when reading the story.

Book Skills New Words (Vocabulary) Interesting and expressive words like stew and scrumptious are introduced. Tell A Story (Narrative Skills)

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| Lexington, Kentucky

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Children can recount the order of the foods that Wolf cooks for Mrs. Chicken, talk about why and describe the final result of the wolf's efforts thanks to the straight -forward progression of the story's events.

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10/28/2010

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Characteristics of Professional Development Linked to Enhanced Pedagogy and Children’s Learning in Early Childhood Settings

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