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A Doll's House Macaroons

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Gender roles is a cliche that compares the lifestyles of men and women. In the late 1800s the average man was known to be the head of the household and could obtain certain jobs while a women could not. Women were only expected to marry a man and spend the rest of their lives serving him. Henrik Ibsen’s practical and considerable play titled A Doll’s House reveals a new side of gender roles in the late 1800s, playing a role in individual rights and on being true to oneself. In this story the female protagonist, Nora, is seen as being confined to social values of that era. Throughout the entire play, we see many situations where Nora is being put down and underestimated. Three of these situations can be when Torvald bans Nora from eating macaroons, …show more content…
He possesses the only key to the mailbox, gives thes certain amounts of spending money to Nora, and any and all major decisions. Christines questions Nora “ And your husband has the keys” in which Nora responds “ Always” (Ibsen 30). This reveals how little Torvalds lets Nora in on real life issues and on how to handle them. The locked mailbox is similar to Nora’s life because it represents her abilities and how limited they are from the house, being unable to express herself or be her true self. Just as the mailbox cannot be unlocked by Nora, Nora cannot be unlocked by the mailbox. This saying that once the mailbox is opened and Krogstad's letter is out there is no going back, Nora will in fact be free of her dolls life. Nora playfully begging as the little spendthrift she is yells “Ten, twenty, thirty, forty. Oh, thank you, thank you, Torvald! This will go a long way” after which Torvald gives her the bills one by one having her beg for more like a dog (Ibsen 2). This quote tells us how Nora gets more money out of Torvald to help her pay her loans without Torvald knowing, just by being her doll self and obsessing over Torvald in her own flirtation way. Nora still wanting more money says that instead of a gift she would rather receive money.“You might give me money, Torvald. Only just what you think you

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