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A Patient's Right

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Submitted By Micha3l
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Pages 4
A Patient’s Right:
Respecting Patient End-of-Life Care Wishes
Introduction
As a citizen in today’s fast paced and medically advanced society, it is imperative to have knowledge and understanding of Advance Directives and what role they play in patient care. In the scenario presented we find Mr. E who is a 67 year old male who lives in a nursing home and has presented to the ER with lung congestion. Mr. E. has a history of diabetes, poor vision, and hypertension, impaired hearing, and is delayed developmentally. After an initial assessment, the physician, Dr. K. has diagnosed the patient with pneumonia secondary to aspiration. Mr. E. has a fever and his oxygen saturation level is 88% on room air. Dr. K has admitted Mr. E to the ICU and has determined that he needs to be placed on a ventilator. When the doctor explains the situation, Mr. E. vehemently states that he does not want a ventilator. Mr. E. has an advance directive that outlines his wishes.
Body
As a nurse in the state of Indiana, it is a responsibility and standard to advocate for the patient while providing competent care according to the patient’s wishes. Indiana law upholds a patient’s written or spoken advance directive in the event that the patient is unable to make decisions regarding their healthcare. In the scenario, Mr. E.’s advance directive was disregarded by the healthcare personnel because he was deemed incompetent of understanding the seriousness of the situation. Thus, the physician and the nurse involved violated Indiana law regarding the patient’s right to choose.
According to the ANA code of ethics, code no. 2: “The nurse’s primary commitment is to the patient, whether an individual, family, group or community.”
This code applies to the case study because it outlines what the primary commitment is for the nurse. This code would impact my professional decision as a nurse in...

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