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Aboriginal Cultural Issues

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self-sustaining industry and Aboriginal people were and would continue to be the marginal minority living on government stipends. Later, as the state policies regarding Aboriginal issues changed from “assimilation” to “self-determination” and social activists like Geoffrey Bardon and Peter Fannin started to promote Aboriginal arts and crafts, the sign meaning of Aboriginal arts gradually transformed. Aboriginal collectives such as Papunya Tula also spread arts and crafts to the mainstream (white) society. Artworks produced in one place were sold in another region and various exhibitions were held in white-dominated places like Melbourne and even outside Australia, in Europe or United States. The aesthetic dimension was increasingly valued. And later, as the associations such as the Aboriginal Arts Board and the Aboriginal Arts and Crafts Pty.ltd became the main buyers of the Aboriginal arts and crafts, the Aboriginal arts and crafts market gradually matured. Aboriginal arts and crafts transformed into high-art commodities that gained popularity among Western art collectors (Myers, 2002). This indexicality, however, was largely constructed by outsiders. The original religious implications of Aboriginal arts and crafts were largely overlooked as Aboriginal arts and crafts were subsumed into the international high art market. Thus the “Aboriginality” sign transformed into a sign of “art” in the eye of …show more content…
The translocal activities take two forms, foreign tourists visiting China and Chinese urban tourists visiting other parts of China. Arts and crafts as souvenirs transformed into a sign of locality to the outsiders and a representation of group (national or local) identity to the

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