Premium Essay

Acquiring a Company

In: Business and Management

Submitted By wilmer
Words 40535
Pages 163
One mission:

2013 Annual Report

A history of delivering strong results
More than Approximately Approximately

10,700 retail units operated in 27 countries

245M customers served weekly in our stores in 27 countries

75

%

of U.S. store operations management joined Walmart as hourly associates

Increase of

Increase of

More than

59% in earnings per share(1)
(1) Data reflects five-year period from fiscal 2009 through 2013.

123% in free cash flow(1)(2)

$

60B

returned to shareholders through dividends and share repurchases(1)

(2) Free cash flow is a non-GAAP measure. Net cash provided by operating activities of continuing operations is the closest GAAP measure to free cash flow. Reconciliations and other information regarding free cash flow and its closest GAAP measure can be found in the Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations included in this Annual Report and on our website at www.stock.walmart.com.

About the cover: Regardless of the market where we operate, the retail format or the website, Walmart serves customers with one core mission: to help people save money so they can live better.
To learn more about Walmart’s business strategies and company mission, please visit our electronic report at www.stock.walmart.com. You’ll hear from management, associates and customers about our business.

Many of Walmart’s most innovative ideas originate from the insights of associates across our global operations.

Michael T. Duke President and Chief Executive Officer Wal-Mart Stores, Inc.

To our shareholders, associates and customers
Over the last few years, I’ve shared with you how we would build the “Next Generation Walmart” and serve the “Next Generation customer.” This came from a belief that the major trends shaping our world are also driving significant change in the...

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