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Advance Case with Ibm Case Manager

In: Business and Management

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Advanced Case Management with IBM Case Manager

Introducing case management and IBM Case Manager Building IBM Case Manager solutions with use case example Covering customization, rules, deployment, and more

Wei-Dong Zhu Brian Benoit Bob Jackson Johnson Liu Mike Marin Seema Meena Juan Felipe Ospina Guillermo Rios

ibm.com/redbooks

International Technical Support Organization Advanced Case Management with IBM Case Manager May 2014

SG24-7929-03

Note: Before using this information and the product it supports, read the information in “Notices” on page xiii.

Fourth Edition (May 2014) This edition applies to Version 5.2.0, IBM Case Manager (product number 5725-A15).
© Copyright International Business Machines Corporation 2013, 2014. All rights reserved. Note to U.S. Government Users Restricted Rights -- Use, duplication or disclosure restricted by GSA ADP Schedule Contract with IBM Corp.

Contents
Notices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xiii Trademarks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xiv Preface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xv Authors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xv Now you can become a published author, too! . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xviii Comments welcome. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xix Stay connected to IBM Redbooks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xix Summary of changes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xxi May 2014, Fourth Edition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xxi Part 1. Concept and overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Chapter 1. Case management concept . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 1.1 Case management overview. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 1.2 What makes case management unique . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 1.2.1 Cases are goal-driven and unpredictable . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 1.2.2 Cases are knowledge-intensive . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 1.2.3 Modeling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 1.2.4 Tasks. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 1.2.5 Routine work and knowledge work . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 1.3 Case Management and IBM BPM Solutions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 1.4 The need for Enterprise Content Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 1.4.1 Information complexity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 1.4.2 Security . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 1.4.3 Retention . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 1.5 The need for collaboration. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 1.6 Case management solutions. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 1.6.1 Case data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 1.6.2 Case folder . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 1.6.3 Tasks. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20 Chapter 2. Typical case management applications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23 2.1 Typical applications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 2.1.1 Solution patterns . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25 2.1.2 Applications by industry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26 2.2 Complaints management example use case . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29 2.2.1 Complaint scenario . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30

© Copyright IBM Corp. 2013, 2014. All rights reserved.

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2.2.2 Resolving the case . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31 2.2.3 Content that is related to the case . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32 2.2.4 Integration with other systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33 Chapter 3. IBM Case Manager overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35 3.1 IBM Case Manager capabilities. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36 3.1.1 Case design and deployment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36 3.1.2 Case management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36 3.1.3 IBM Case Manager API . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36 3.1.4 Tools . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37 3.1.5 Solution templates. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37 3.1.6 Content and process management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37 3.1.7 Collaboration and social software tools. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37 3.1.8 Business rules. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38 3.1.9 Case analytics. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38 3.1.10 Reporting. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38 3.1.11 Content Analytics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38 3.1.12 Forms integration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38 3.2 IBM Case Manager environments. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39 3.2.1 Environments and case management phases . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39 3.2.2 Solutions and deployment in development environment. . . . . . . . . . 42 3.3 IBM Case Manager components. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42 3.3.1 IBM Case Manager core components. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44 3.3.2 IBM Case Manager optional components . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50 3.3.3 IBM Case Manager extensions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52 3.4 IBM Case Manager architecture . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54 3.4.1 Case Manager Builder . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55 3.4.2 Case Manager Client . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55 3.4.3 Case Manager API . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55 3.4.4 Content Platform Engine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60 3.5 IBM Case Manager configurations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60 3.5.1 Development environment configuration. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60 3.5.2 Production environment with high availability . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63 3.5.3 Production environment with partitioning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65 Chapter 4. Inner workings of IBM Case Manager . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69 4.1 IBM Case Manager object model . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71 4.1.1 Solution . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 72 4.1.2 Case types . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76 4.1.3 Roles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 80 4.1.4 Roles in-basket . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 80 4.1.5 Personal in-baskets. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 81 4.1.6 Configuring manual work assignment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 83

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4.1.7 Configuring role pages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 90 4.1.8 Document types . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 90 4.1.9 Task type. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 91 4.1.10 Tasks. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 97 4.2 Case object model implementation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 102 4.2.1 Design object store . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 103 4.2.2 Target environment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 105 4.2.3 Project areas for supporting parallel project development . . . . . . . 107 4.3 IBM Case Manager pages. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 109 4.3.1 Default pages in a Solution . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 109 4.3.2 Default Cases pages. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 110 4.3.3 Default Task pages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 111 4.3.4 IBM Case Manager widgets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 113 4.4 Tasks and associated workflow processes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 114 4.4.1 Workflow association . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 114 4.4.2 Workflow data fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 115 4.4.3 Workflow attachments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 117 4.4.4 Starting task workflows . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 117 4.4.5 Workflow processing and task state . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 118 4.5 Object model for IBM Content Manager integration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 118 Part 2. Solution development. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 123 Chapter 5. IBM Case Manager tools . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 125 5.1 IBM Case Manager tools overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 126 5.2 IBM Case Manager configuration tool . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 126 5.2.1 Starting the IBM Case Manager configuration tool . . . . . . . . . . . . . 127 5.2.2 Creating a profile. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 127 5.2.3 Running the profile tasks. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 129 5.3 IBM Case Manager administration client. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 133 5.3.1 Copying a solution. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 133 5.3.2 Creating solution templates. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 141 5.3.3 Using solution templates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 143 5.3.4 Exporting and importing a solution . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 146 5.3.5 Exporting business rules . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 150 5.3.6 Configure locks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 151 5.3.7 Enabling case history store . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 153 5.3.8 Widget packages. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 153 5.3.9 Configuring an audit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 154 5.3.10 Configuring security . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 158 5.3.11 Manage project areas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 163 5.3.12 Extra options for an administrator in administration client. . . . . . . 165 5.4 IBM Case Manager Builder . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 166

Contents

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5.4.1 5.4.2 5.4.3 5.4.4 5.4.5

Multiple user solution development in Case Manager Builder . . . . 167 Solution assets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 168 Solution lock and draft object . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 169 Case Manager Builder save options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 175 Committing and deploying a solution . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 175

Chapter 6. Designing case management solutions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 179 6.1 Business goals of a case management solution . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 180 6.2 Designing the solution . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 181 6.2.1 Agile and iterative methodologies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 181 6.2.2 Case design . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 182 6.2.3 Task design . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 183 6.2.4 Case documents . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 185 6.2.5 Business rules. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 186 6.2.6 Modeling how cases are created . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 186 6.3 Creating the solution . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 187 6.4 Defining your solution . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 188 6.4.1 Defining case properties . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 189 6.4.2 Defining case types . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 189 6.4.3 Defining document types. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 189 6.4.4 Defining roles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 190 6.4.5 Defining in-baskets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 190 6.4.6 Defining pages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 190 6.4.7 Defining case types . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 191 6.4.8 Defining views . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 191 6.4.9 Defining tasks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 191 6.5 Configuring your solution. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 195 6.5.1 Advanced in-basket configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 195 6.5.2 Advanced property layout views within a case . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 196 6.5.3 Configuring pages for advanced user interfaces. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 197 6.5.4 Advanced task configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 197 6.5.5 Using forms to enhance user interfaces . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 199 6.5.6 Providing users with custom tasks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 201 6.5.7 Configuring the security definitions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 201 6.5.8 Configuring case analytics and reporting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 202 6.5.9 Configuring the Cognos Real-Time Monitor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 205 6.6 Customizing and integrating your solution . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 205 6.7 Documenting your solution . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 208 Chapter 7. Building a simple solution: Part 1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 211 7.1 Building the sample solution overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 212 7.2 Defining the solution basics. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 213 7.2.1 Adding a solution. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 213

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7.2.2 Setting up properties . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 215 7.2.3 Setting up roles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 220 7.2.4 Setting up in-baskets. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 222 7.2.5 Setting up document types . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 225 7.3 Defining the case type. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 227 7.3.1 Creating a case type . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 227 7.3.2 Configuring case type properties . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 229 7.3.3 Configuring the Case Summary view . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 230 7.3.4 Configuring custom properties layout view . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 231 7.3.5 Configuring the case search . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 239 7.3.6 Defining case folders structure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 240 7.4 Defining embedded rules . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 241 7.5 Defining case tasks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 247 7.5.1 Creating Upgrade Options set. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 248 7.5.2 Creating the Upsell Opportunity container task. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 249 7.5.3 Creating the Upgrade Product task . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 251 7.5.4 Creating the Upgrade Plan task . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 254 7.5.5 Creating the Call Customer task . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 255 7.5.6 Creating the Verify Billing task . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 255 7.5.7 Creating the Verify Complaint task . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 257 7.5.8 Creating the remaining tasks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 258 7.5.9 Reviewing task summary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 265 Chapter 8. Building a simple solution: Part 2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 267 8.1 Configuring workflow diagrams by using Step Designer . . . . . . . . . . . . . 268 8.1.1 Creating the Upgrade Product task diagram. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 268 8.1.2 Creating the Upgrade Plan task diagram . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 275 8.1.3 Creating the Call Customer task diagram . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 276 8.1.4 Creating the Verify Billing task diagram . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 277 8.1.5 Creating the Verify Complaint task diagram . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 280 8.1.6 Creating the Review Product Complaint task diagram . . . . . . . . . . 281 8.1.7 Creating the Review Non-Product Complaint task diagram . . . . . . 282 8.1.8 Creating the Investigate Product Safety task diagram . . . . . . . . . . 283 8.1.9 Creating the Send Corresponding Letter task diagram . . . . . . . . . . 285 8.1.10 Creating the Close Complaint task diagram . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 289 8.1.11 Creating the Investigate Employee task diagram . . . . . . . . . . . . . 290 8.1.12 Creating the Request Assistance task diagram . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 293 8.2 Saving and validating the solution. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 295 8.3 Deploying the Customer Complaints solution . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 296 8.4 Testing the Customer Complaints solution . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 298 8.5 Improving the solution . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 309 8.5.1 Solution icon . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 310 8.5.2 Property choice list . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 310

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8.5.3 Solution properties . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 310 8.5.4 Document properties. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 310 8.5.5 In-basket properties . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 311 Chapter 9. Migrating and deploying solutions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 313 9.1 Migration models and migration procedure overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 314 9.1.1 Traditional FileNet P8 application migration model . . . . . . . . . . . . . 314 9.1.2 IBM Case Manager solution migration model . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 316 9.1.3 Using the best of both migration models . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 317 9.2 Migration and deployment procedure overview. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 320 9.3 Preparation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 322 9.3.1 Preparing IBM Case Manager assets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 322 9.3.2 Preparing FileNet P8 assets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 324 9.3.3 Preparing other IBM assets and external artifacts . . . . . . . . . . . . . 327 9.4 Migration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 329 9.4.1 Migrating IBM Case Manager assets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 329 9.4.2 Migrating FileNet P8 assets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 343 9.4.3 Migrating other IBM and external artifacts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 345 9.5 Deployment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 346 9.5.1 Deploying IBM Case Manager assets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 346 9.5.2 Deploying FileNet P8 assets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 348 9.5.3 Deploying other IBM and external artifacts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 348 9.6 Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 349 9.6.1 Configuring IBM Case Manager assets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 349 9.6.2 Configuring FileNet P8 assets. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 353 9.6.3 Configuring other IBM and external artifacts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 354 Part 3. Solution customization and advanced topics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 355 Chapter 10. User interface and widgets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 357 10.1 User interface navigation. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 358 10.1.1 Navigating Case Manager Builder . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 358 10.1.2 Navigating Page Designer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 359 10.1.3 Multiple user editing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 364 10.1.4 Navigating Case Manager Client . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 365 10.2 Understanding page types and custom pages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 365 10.2.1 Default pages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 365 10.2.2 Custom pages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 367 10.3 Accessing the Properties View Designer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 372 10.3.1 System-generated view. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 373 10.3.2 Designing a custom view . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 373 10.3.3 Configuring the default view for a case type . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 375 10.3.4 Overriding the default view in the Properties widget . . . . . . . . . . . 376 10.4 Using default widgets and their payloads . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 377

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10.4.1 Standard widgets that are provided by IBM Case Manager . . . . . 378 10.4.2 Widget payloads . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 379 10.4.3 Wiring a widget to another widget . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 380 10.4.4 Widget incoming and outgoing events and payloads . . . . . . . . . . 382 10.4.5 In-basket widget event and corresponding payload . . . . . . . . . . . 383 10.4.6 Search widget event and corresponding payload . . . . . . . . . . . . . 384 10.5 Creating and deploying a custom widget . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 386 10.5.1 Setting up your development environment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 388 10.5.2 Creating your widget definition and catalog files . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 389 10.5.3 Creating the IBM Content Navigator plug-in . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 392 10.5.4 Creating the custom page widget with content pane . . . . . . . . . . 393 10.5.5 Creating IBM Case Manager JavaScript API calls and objects . . 396 10.5.6 Building the custom widget package . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 397 10.5.7 Deploying the custom widget package . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 400 10.5.8 Adding the custom widget to the page . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 404 10.6 Creating a custom task . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 405 10.7 Using the Timeline Visualizer and Instruction widgets . . . . . . . . . . . . . 408 10.7.1 Configuring auditing and case history store . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 409 10.7.2 Displaying case history in the Timeline Visualizer widget . . . . . . . 409 10.7.3 Displaying instructions in the Instruction widget . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 410 Chapter 11. Customization topics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 411 11.1 Using project areas when developing solutions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 412 11.2 Automated handling of ingested documents . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 413 11.2.1 Generalized approach for handling ingested documents . . . . . . . 414 11.2.2 Implementation methods . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 415 11.2.3 Sample JavaScript based implementation procedure . . . . . . . . . . 415 11.3 Splitting a case . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 421 11.3.1 Splitting a case into two cases . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 422 11.4 Basic customization scenarios . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 424 11.4.1 Adding a button to the toolbar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 424 11.4.2 Adding custom actions to menu action . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 425 11.5 Intermediate customization scenarios . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 426 11.5.1 Enumerating documents . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 427 11.5.2 Opening multiple work items . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 428 11.5.3 Adding entry template via custom action . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 431 11.5.4 Adding an attachment to the case. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 433 11.5.5 Creating in-basket dynamic filter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 437 11.5.6 Filtering Case Information widget to show comments only . . . . . . 439 11.5.7 Modifying property attributes by using the Property Controller . . . 440 11.5.8 Getting the next work item with custom logic after completing a work item . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 443 11.5.9 Filling the Case List widget based on search results . . . . . . . . . . 447

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11.6 Advanced customization scenarios . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 449 11.7 Multilingual support . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 450 11.7.1 Translating the Case Manager user interface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 450 11.7.2 Translating custom strings, solution assets, and others . . . . . . . . 451 Chapter 12. Advanced solution topics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 453 12.1 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 454 12.2 Process Designer integration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 455 12.2.1 Accessing Process Designer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 455 12.2.2 Solution editing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 458 12.2.3 Process editing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 459 12.2.4 Activity parameters in Process Designer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 460 12.3 Shadow fields and queue updates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 462 12.3.1 Shadow field defined . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 463 12.3.2 Case properties, queues, and work items . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 463 12.3.3 Shadow field synchronization . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 465 12.3.4 Prior version behavior . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 466 12.3.5 Parallel property changes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 469 12.4 Case operation components . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 470 12.5 Advanced design examples . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 472 12.5.1 Document arrival email notification . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 472 12.5.2 Creating more in-baskets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 483 12.5.3 Showing process errors in Case Manager Client . . . . . . . . . . . . . 492 Chapter 13. Business rules . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 507 13.1 Benefits of using rules . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 508 13.2 Integrated rules . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 509 13.2.1 Text rules . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 510 13.2.2 Decision tables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 516 13.2.3 Text rule versus decision table . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 518 13.2.4 Implementation techniques . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 519 13.3 integrated rules versus external rules . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 521 13.4 Creating and invoking rules. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 522 13.4.1 Creating a simple text-based rule . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 522 13.4.2 Reviewing a business rule . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 527 13.4.3 Invoking rules with parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 532 13.5 External rules engine integration. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 535 13.5.1 Incorporating a business rule in the case solution . . . . . . . . . . . . 535 Chapter 14. Integration points . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 545 14.1 Model APIs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 546 14.2 REST APIs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 546 14.2.1 Case Manager REST API . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 547 14.2.2 Process Engine REST API . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 548

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14.2.3 Content Management Interoperability Services API . . . . . . . . . . . 549 14.2.4 Navigating from REST API calls to Model API calls . . . . . . . . . . . 549 14.3 Using Java APIs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 550 14.3.1 Integrating by using Content Engine Java API . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 551 14.3.2 Integrating by using Process Engine Java API . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 552 14.3.3 Integrating by using the Case Java API . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 553 14.4 Using Case Manager Client-side integration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 554 14.4.1 Website widget . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 554 14.4.2 Script Adapter widget . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 554 14.4.3 Custom widget . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 555 14.5 Using Content Platform Engine workflow integration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 555 14.5.1 Custom components . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 556 14.5.2 Web services. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 556 14.5.3 Database interaction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 557 14.6 External data service. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 557 14.7 Other supported integrations. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 558 14.7.1 Integration with IBM Operational Decision Manager . . . . . . . . . . . 558 14.7.2 Integration with IBM Content Manager . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 559 14.7.3 External Data Services framework . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 560 14.7.4 Integration with IBM Business Process Manager . . . . . . . . . . . . . 560 14.7.5 Integration with IBM Content Analytics with Enterprise Search . . 561 Appendix A. Additional material . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 563 Locating the Web material . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 563 Using the Web material . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 564 System requirements for downloading the Web material . . . . . . . . . . . . . 564 Downloading and extracting the Web material . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 564 Related publications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 565 IBM Redbooks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 565 Online resources . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 566 Help from IBM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 566

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Notices
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Trademarks
IBM, the IBM logo, and ibm.com are trademarks or registered trademarks of International Business Machines Corporation in the United States, other countries, or both. These and other IBM trademarked terms are marked on their first occurrence in this information with the appropriate symbol (® or ™), indicating US registered or common law trademarks owned by IBM at the time this information was published. Such trademarks may also be registered or common law trademarks in other countries. A current list of IBM trademarks is available on the Web at http://www.ibm.com/legal/copytrade.shtml The following terms are trademarks of the International Business Machines Corporation in the United States, other countries, or both: Cognos® DB2® developerWorks® Domino® FileNet® IBM® ILOG® Lotus® Lotus Notes® Notes® OmniFind® Quickr® Rational® Redbooks® Redbooks (logo) Sametime® WebSphere®

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The following terms are trademarks of other companies: Microsoft, and the Windows logo are trademarks of Microsoft Corporation in the United States, other countries, or both. Java, and all Java-based trademarks and logos are trademarks or registered trademarks of Oracle and/or its affiliates. Other company, product, or service names may be trademarks or service marks of others.

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Preface
Organizations face case management challenges that require insight, responsiveness, and collaboration. IBM® Case Manager, Version 5.2, is an advanced case management product that unites information, process, and people to provide the 360-degree view of case information and achieve optimized outcomes. With IBM Case Manager, knowledge workers can extract critical case information through integrated business rules, collaboration, and analytics. This easy access to information enhances decision-making ability and leads to more successful case outcomes. IBM Case Manager also helps capture industry preferred practices in frameworks and templates to empower business users and accelerate return on investment. This IBM Redbooks® publication introduces the case management concept. It includes the reason for and benefits of case management, and why it is different from the traditional business process management or content management. In addition, this book addresses how you can design and build a case management solution with IBM Case Manager and integrate that solution with external products and components. This book is intended to provide IT architects and IT specialists with the high-level concepts of case management and the capabilities of IBM Case Manager. It also serves as a practical guide for IT professionals who are responsible for designing, building, customizing, and deploying IBM Case Manager solutions.

Authors
This book was produced by a team of specialists from around the world working at IBM Software Development Lab in Costa Mesa, California. The Redbooks publication team consists of the following members: Wei-Dong Zhu (Jackie) is an Enterprise Content Management Project Leader with ITSO. Jackie joined IBM in 1996 and has more than 10 years of software development experience in accounting, image workflow processing, and digital media distribution. She is a Certified Solution Designer for IBM Content Manager, and has managed many Enterprise Content Management Redbooks publications. Jackie holds a Master of Science degree in Computer Science from the University of the Southern California.

© Copyright IBM Corp. 2013, 2014. All rights reserved.

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Brian Benoit is the Technical Consultant for Pyramid Solutions' ECM practice. He is responsible for pre-sales support, Pyramid Product offerings, and support for the Pyramid relationship with IBM’s ECM development groups. Brian joined Pyramid Solutions in 2003 and has over 20 years experience in the IT industry. Brian is an IBM Certified Specialist and Solution Design Technical Professional in Content Manager, Case Foundation, and Case Manager. He is recognized for developing IBM Case Manager solutions that are deployed in the financial, insurance, and government industries. Bob Jackson is a Client Solutions Professional (CSP) with the Eastern Region ECM SWAT Team in the United States. In this role, Bob provides consultation on complex Case Management presales projects. Bob also presented IBM Case Manager topics to major corporations worldwide. Bob developed many internal IBM case management education, complex case management demonstrations, proof of technology presentations, and proof of concept projects. His expertise includes ECM, business process management, portal servers, application servers, and web development. Bob is a licensed professional engineer with a Bachelor of Engineering in Materials Science from Thayer School of Engineering at Dartmouth College. He also holds an Artium Bacculaurei from Dartmouth College. Johnson Liu is a Software Engineer with IBM Software Group in the United States. Johnson developed many early training workshops, white papers, and code samples for IBM Case Manager. Johnson has expertise in and supports customers in the areas of widget development, user interface, and solution deployment and conversion. Johnson has a Bachelor of Science degree from the University of California in Business Information Management. Mike Marin is an IBM Distinguished Engineer and the chief architect for the IBM Case Manager product. Mike also is an Association for Computing Machinery (ACM) Distinguished Engineer and life member, with an MSCS in Artificial Intelligence. He has more than 20 years of experience designing and developing system software. For the last 20 years, he developed several workflow, business process management (BPM), and case management products. He also participated in standard organizations including WfMC, OMG, and OASIS working on BPM and workflow standards. Mike edited and contributed to the definition of several software standards and wrote several papers and articles on the subject. Seema Meena is a Software Engineer at Software Group in IBM India Software Lab. Seema has more than eight years of experience in software development. She currently works on the IBM Case Manager Builder development. Seema holds a Bachelor degree in Information Technology from Rajasthan University, India. She joined IBM in 2008 and worked on the IBM eDiscovery Analyzer product in the past.

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Juan Felipe Ospina is a Client Solution Specialist for Enterprise Content Management with coverage for Colombia, Ecuador, Venezuela, and Peru, in Latin America. He has 12 years experience in implementation of large-scale information systems in content and business process management segments and as a developer in Java technology, business analyst, and solution architect. For the last five years, Juan Felipe has focused on case management and capture solution design, development, and support. Juan Felipe has a degree in Computer Science from EAFIT University of Medellin Colombia. Guillermo Rios is a Client Solution Professional and a Senior Certified Enterprise Content Management Solution Consultant in California, IBM US. He holds a degree in Computer Science from Universidad Anahuac, Mexico. Guillermo joined IBM in 2006 as part of the FileNet® acquisition where he worked in the Latin America team as a Senior IT Specialist for eight years helping customers and partners in the design and implementation of complex FileNet solutions for the banking, insurance, petrochemical, and government sectors. For the past four years, Guillermo focused on IBM Case Manager and IBM Case Foundation solutions for North America ECM Technical Competency Center. Guillermo is a SWAT team member for the ECM West IMT. He has 25 years of experience in the Information Technology and Software Industry. Special thanks to B A Nagabhushan, who contributed a portion of the content in the Rules chapter. Very special thanks to Thuy Do, Yvonne Santiago and Darik Siegfried, who always are extremely helpful in the production of IBM Redbooks publications, especially this one. Thanks to the following IBM Case Manager development management, product management, and architect team for their support of the project: William Lobig Martin Shramo Dave Perman Huzefa Hakim Sean Yang Lauren Mayes In addition, thanks to the following people for helping us during and after the residency: Barry Beach Joshua Burke Dao Quynh Dang Laurent Dubois Mike Fannon David Hanson

Preface

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Wen-Chin Hsieh (Steven) Srinivas Jandhyala Vishnu N KV Diane McFee Krishnaveni PillutlaLatha Ramakrishnaiah Ravi Ray Eugene Rozhdestvensky Yvonne Santiago Patricia Sort De Sanz Brent Taylor Xiao Ji Tian Steve Timms Thomas Yang IBM Software Group, IBM US, and IBM India Thanks to the authors of the previous edition of this book: Wei-Dong Zhu Michael Kirchner Tom Ko Michael Oland Balunaini Prasad Mike Prentice Monique Ruggiero

Now you can become a published author, too!
Here’s an opportunity to spotlight your skills, grow your career, and become a published author—all at the same time! Join an ITSO residency project and help write a book in your area of expertise, while honing your experience using leading-edge technologies. Your efforts will help to increase product acceptance and customer satisfaction, as you expand your network of technical contacts and relationships. Residencies run from two to six weeks in length, and you can participate either in person or as a remote resident working from your home base. Find out more about the residency program, browse the residency index, and apply online at this website: http://www.ibm.com/redbooks/residencies.html

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Comments welcome
Your comments are important to us! We want our books to be as helpful as possible. Send us your comments about this book or other IBM Redbooks publications in one of the following ways: Use the online Contact us review Redbooks form found at this website: http://www.ibm.com/redbooks Send your comments in an email to: redbooks@us.ibm.com Mail your comments to: IBM Corporation, International Technical Support Organization Dept. HYTD Mail Station P099 2455 South Road Poughkeepsie, NY 12601-5400

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Preface

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Advanced Case Management with IBM Case Manager

Summary of changes
This section describes the technical changes that were made in this edition of the book and in previous editions. This edition also might include minor corrections and editorial changes that are not identified. Summary of Changes for SG24-7929-03 for Advanced Case Management with IBM Case Manager as created or updated on June 2, 2014.

May 2014, Fourth Edition
This revision reflects the addition, deletion, or modification of new and changed information that is described next.

New information
The following new information is included: Chapter 5, “IBM Case Manager tools” on page 125 is new. Chapter 9, “Migrating and deploying solutions” on page 313 was re-written. Chapter 11, “Customization topics” on page 411 many new sections about customization scenarios were added. Chapter 12, “Advanced solution topics” on page 453 is based on the original “Round tripping” chapter and new content was added. Chapter 13, “Business rules” on page 507 is new.

© Copyright IBM Corp. 2013, 2014. All rights reserved.

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Changed information
All existing chapters in parts 1 and 2 were updated. In this version, we provide more explanation on designing a Case Manager solution, the new functions and features Case Manager provides, and more customization scenario samples. The book chapters were re-organized into three parts. The original part 3 of the book was dropped from this release except the “Integration points” chapter. The previous version of the book can still be downloaded as additional material along with this current version of the book. This book covers IBM Case Manager, Version 5.2. The previous edition covers IBM Case Manager, Version 5.1.1.

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Part 1

Part

1

Concept and overview
This part introduces the concept of case management and IBM Case Manager. It provides case scenarios for case management systems and addresses the design approach for those solutions. This part includes the following chapters: Chapter 1, “Case management concept” on page 3 Chapter 2, “Typical case management applications” on page 23 Chapter 3, “IBM Case Manager overview” on page 35 Chapter 4, “Inner workings of IBM Case Manager” on page 69

© Copyright IBM Corp. 2013, 2014. All rights reserved.

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Advanced Case Management with IBM Case Manager

1

Chapter 1.

Case management concept
This chapter introduces the basic concepts of case management, including those aspects of case management that make it unique compared with other types of business applications. The relationship between case management and enterprise content management, collaboration, and business process management also are explored. Finally, the concept of case management solutions is introduced. This chapter includes the following sections: Case management overview What makes case management unique Case Management and IBM BPM Solutions The need for Enterprise Content Management The need for collaboration Case management solutions

© Copyright IBM Corp. 2013, 2014. All rights reserved.

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1.1 Case management overview
Case management was developed because certain business applications that are performed by knowledge workers require a great deal of flexibility, adaptability, control, and collaboration to achieve successful outcomes. Traditional Enterprise Content Management systems and the structured control of business process management (BPM) are insufficient to meet the requirements of these applications. In certain industries, such as healthcare, insurance, and the legal profession, case management is fairly well-understood. The case management approach, however, can be successfully applied to a broad set of business applications. Doing so gives knowledge workers and businesses the capabilities they need to achieve their business objectives. Case management is built around the concept of processing a case, which is a collection of information and coordinated activities by knowledge workers or case workers. A case represents an entity that the organization must process and it is sometimes identified by having a subject, similar to the subject of a sentence or a narrative. The subject can be one of the following types: Single person, such as a patient, customer, employee, or taxpayer Legal entity, such as a business, church, or government Two or more people or entities, such as in legal cases (Jones v. Smith) An event, such as a fraud occurrence, security violation, or system outage A case folder is a container that allows workers to store and retrieve information that pertains to the case. It also tracks the tasks that are required to process the case. A case management solution is the application of case management technology to a particular business problem in a particular domain. You can use case management solutions in the following scenarios: Customer complaint management where the subject is a customer Benefit enrollment where the subject is an employee Legal cases where the subject is a defendant Allow processing where the subject is a citizen Healthcare claim reimbursement where the subject is a patient Credit card dispute management where the subject is a customer For any case management solution, there can be many active cases. For example, the customer complaint management solution creates a case for each customer complaint. The term case instance is sometimes used to refer to these individual cases.

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Advanced Case Management with IBM Case Manager

Case management solutions are knowledge-intensive. These solutions require case workers to coordinate data, tasks, processes, and services to achieve a positive business outcome. The case workers need a large degree of flexibility and adaptability to process the case. The requirement for flexibility makes these solutions difficult to implement in traditional Enterprise Content Management and BPM systems because most traditional implementations require predictable and repeatable processes. Cases are less predictable than traditional processes because the case worker judgment and experience influence how the case is handled, and therefore, the outcome. However, case management solutions also are repetitive, and therefore, require process support that makes it difficult to implement them by using only an Enterprise Content Management system. Case workers are not the only individuals who interact with a case. A case

participant might be a user who helps process and close a case. A participant also might be a user who performs management operations, such as assessments, audit, and outcome analysis. Management functions can be performed on a single case instance, or across many case instances. Case management solutions provide participants with views into the case that allow them to efficiently complete their assignments. However, not all the participants in a case need the same level of flexibility or access to the case. In most situations, one or a few knowledge workers control the case and other participants are restricted to performing well-defined activities. The participants who interact with a case can be organized by roles. For example, in a credit card dispute case solution, roles might include customer service representative, dispute agent, dispute supervisor, data clerk, and fraud investigator. Implementing a robust and effective case management solution requires a software platform with a range of capabilities, including content management, process management, business rules, collaboration, and analytics. The solution must integrate seamlessly into the work environment of the case participants. The user interface must provide flexibility and allow a high degree of collaboration among the participants. For example, the interface must allow a user to dynamically add more tasks to a case already in process. A case management solution must provide case workers with the full context of the case they are working on. This context is referred to as a 360 view of the case. In practice, case workers with enough privileges must have access to all the information pertinent to a case. This information includes history, documents of various media types, and content added by other case workers. In addition, the 360 view includes all the process information for the case. By having all the relevant information available, case workers can make better informed decisions.

Chapter 1. Case management concept

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Effective visualization of case information (including case history) is important to improve knowledge workers’ productivity. The ability to visualize how the case looked at the moment in which decisions were made, combined with the comments of the workers that took the decision, provides invaluable insights to other workers or supervisors.

1.2 What makes case management unique
Case management looks at repeatable business problems from the perspective of the knowledge workers, and it empowers the knowledge worker to solve those problems. It does so with a flexible solution that bundles the case information, documents, rules, and all the tasks that might be required to solve the business problem. Case solutions are goal-oriented, but a business goal can be achieved in multiple ways, and not all of them can be predetermined. Therefore, case workers require the flexibility to decide how the goal is achieved. The focus of a case management solution is the goal-oriented nature of the problem being solved. All the detailed aspects of the solution work to achieve that goal. Whether it is a rule, document, task, or a group of data elements, these characteristics all work to help bring the case to its end state. This focus is where the uniqueness of a case management solution originates. The goal-oriented approach, in case solutions, is different than that of traditional BPM solutions, which focus almost exclusively around process. The focus around a case and its interactions with data, rules, content, and processes is the complexity that differentiates them.

1.2.1 Cases are goal-driven and unpredictable
The concept of a goal-driven case solution is to bring focus on what is needed to be done to a case. A case is to be processed, completed, paid, or resolved. The data, rules, and activities that are identified exist to support this end goal. Although the case constructs are defined, each individual case instance has enough variability that a knowledge worker judgment is required to manage the case to its end state. For example, in a credit card dispute case, the business goal is to resolve the dispute. Although each case instance has the same goal, the outcome of each case can be different. In the credit card dispute example, some disputes end with the merchant returning money to the customer. Other disputes end with the customer maintaining the charge on the credit card, the bank fixing an accounting mistake, and so on.

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Advanced Case Management with IBM Case Manager

In this example, each case is completed with a different outcome, but all of them met the same business goal of solving the credit card dispute. A case management solution is designed to provide the tools to solve a repeatable situation. In a credit card dispute resolution, the situation is customers who are disputing charges to their credit cards. Although all of the processing patterns are similar, each dispute is different enough to present a certain level of unpredictability in the process. The overall case design might look similar, but the case worker must react to new information in ways that cannot be predetermined. New information can change the outcome of a case in ways that can be determined only by the case worker. However, not all aspects of a case are unpredictable, and so IBM BPM technology can be used to model the predictable aspects of case solutions. These predictable aspects of the case processing can be encapsulated into process fragments that can be used as part of the toolset that case workers use. Case management recognizes that a business goal can be achieved in multiple ways, not all of which can be predetermined. The path that follows from the start of a case to the completion of that case can be different for each case instance. Not all activities or steps that are required to complete a case can be known when you design the case solution. For the known activities, the order of execution might be unknown.

1.2.2 Cases are knowledge-intensive
The reason IBM BPM and Enterprise Content Management technologies are insufficient for implementing case management is that cases are knowledge-intensive, which requires the judgment of case workers. Therefore, the outcome of the case depends more on human judgment than on the underlying technology. The technology, however, must support the case worker by providing the tools that are needed to advance the case to its resolution. It cannot replace the judgment of the case worker, and should not unnecessarily constrain the actions of the case worker. Although the outcome of the case depends on case worker judgment, case workers cannot arbitrarily decide the fate of a case. Case workers must justify their decisions and collaborate, as necessary, to reach those decisions. The case management solution must support this knowledge-intensive activity by providing the tools and facilities to help the knowledge workers accomplish their work. At the same time, it must provide the persistence, history, tracking, and monitoring that is needed to justify and audit case worker actions and decisions.

Chapter 1. Case management concept

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1.2.3 Modeling
Case and process modeling are separate. Modeling is the definition of the solution. It uses a tool to describe the solution that must be run to the system. The tool is normally called a modeling or design tool, and the model is the human readable output or printout that is produced by the tool. The IBM BPM process modeling is well-understood and formalized by standards, such as the Business Process Modeling Notation (BPMN). Case management has not been studied as long or as deeply. However, there is an effort underway at the Object Management Group (OMG) to define a modeling notation that is called Case Management Modeling and Notation (CMMN). This notation is in beta status. CMMN helps clarify and formalize case management modeling. From a modeling perspective, case modeling focuses on knowledge worker needs. It allows the person who is modeling the case to define the tools that are needed to complete a case. Those tools can be modeled as tasks, which can be process fragments. The modeling of cases focuses on what must be done to complete a case instead of how it is done. Tasks in a case then describe what must be done. Not defining the how gives the case workers more flexibility to decide the best tasks for a particular case instance. IBM BPM models focus on the activities that are required to achieve the business goal and the efficient ordering of those activities. Therefore, IBM BPM models describe how the processes are done, in addition to what must be done.

1.2.4 Tasks
For the case model to achieve a balance between formal and informal processes, the formal processes are broken into process fragments. This concept is the case task, which corresponds to a process fragment, but also might be implemented with other non-BPM technologies. Tasks break the model of cases into two levels of abstractions. A task represents a higher level of abstraction than process and describes “what” must be done. A task also can describe “why” it must be done. For example, a task to review a customer’s application must be done if a new customer application is received. This concept allows the person modeling the case to model at a higher level of abstraction and avoid describing the details of “how” a task must be done. When you model a case, you are trying to answer the “what” and “why” questions by using tasks. In contrast, when you model a IBM BPM process, the designer answers the “what”, “who”, “when”, and “how” questions.

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Advanced Case Management with IBM Case Manager

The implementation of the task details corresponds to the lower level of abstraction. Implementation might involve modeling a process fragment where you answer the what, who, when, and how questions. However, it also can be implemented by other technologies or applications. Figure 1-1 shows the IBM Case Manager case task page with a model of a case that contains seven tasks. Tasks are not connected with lines as they are in traditional IBM BPM systems because there is no execution order between them. The tasks are designed as tools for the case worker.

Figure 1-1 Example of tasks modeling in Case Manager Builder

Chapter 1. Case management concept

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1.2.5 Routine work and knowledge work
Most case solutions require knowledge workers and routine workers. Routine workers are sometime called heads-down workers, and are assigned repetitive work that requires little judgment. Routine workers are suited for data entry applications, such as scanning correspondence, and certain types of IBM BPM applications. In processing cases, organizations must manage the use of routine workers and knowledge workers assignments. Most organizations manage the two pools of workers separately, and separate routine workers roles and knowledge workers roles. The concept of role allows organizations to fulfill those assignments by moving workers between the roles, or having workers who are assigned to multiple roles. Roles allow managers and supervisors to quickly and easily move resources where they are needed.

1.3 Case Management and IBM BPM Solutions
Case management solutions have a primary focus on the data around the case and what is needed to complete it. In a IBM BPM solution, the focus is on the process and what is needed to complete it. The confusion at times comes when the case uses a defined process. The use of these defined processes (which can use IBM BPM) is needed within the case solution, but is not the focus of the solution. The processes are short lived and achieve a specific purpose, such as obtaining specific information, processing a rule, gaining approval, asking for input, or updating other systems with decision. Case management and business process management solutions have the following key differences: Cases tend to be more unpredictable and rely more on a knowledge worker’s judgment than on system control or business-rule-based control flow. The emphasis of case management is on designing a flexible process to drive a business goal. The emphasis of business process management is on designing a repeatable step-by-step procedure to solve a business problem. In case management, the business problem is solved by a knowledge worker who is using tools in the form of tasks that are not necessarily modeled. In business process management, the business problems are always solved by following a modeled process. Case management solutions focus on the case and its data and activities, and how to complete the case. BPM solutions focus exclusively on the process and how to best accomplish that specific process.

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Advanced Case Management with IBM Case Manager

Cases have a nondeterministic lifecycle and can exist for a long time. IBM BPM processes have a deterministic lifecycle and focus on processing within a shorter timeline. Cases always involve human participants, whereas a business process management solution might not involve any human participants. Cases always involve content because content is what knowledge workers use to make decisions, whereas processes might not include content at all. The knowledge workers who process a case decide which tasks are required to complete the case. In a business process management system, the software requires activities that are specified in a process model or business rules. When a case is closed, the case folder remains accessible. Case closure (or completion) is a relative term in that a case is always accessible and can be reopened for more processing, as required. Case management solutions are considered partially repeatable, which means that much of the processing is repeatable, but not entirely. The business goal is always the focus, but the path to accomplish it is non-deterministic. The tasks might or might not be performed, which is different from traditional IBM BPM. Case management recognizes that many solutions cannot be fully described in a IBM BPM system because of one or more of the following factors: The focus is on the case data, not the process. The flexibility that is required by knowledge workers is contrary to the forced control flow that is imposed by processes. Not all the tasks are known beforehand. The order of the tasks is unknown. The case data outlives the process completion. There are several technologies that provide process functionality. These technologies go from formal, structured processes at one end of a spectrum to informal processes at the other. Formal processes were called production workflow in the 1980s, and today are implemented by IBM BPM systems. These solutions also are referred to as process-centric. A formal process encodes the business goals the process is designed to accomplish, which gives the IBM BPM system full control over the business goal. Formal processes might not have any human intervention. If they do, the participants on the process do not need to know the business goal. If the participants run their assigned activities, the IBM BPM system ensures that the business goals are achieved.

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The IBM BPM system is in complete control, which allows vendors to provide a full suite of functions to model, track, monitor, and manage the processes. The process can contain business rules that change the execution path of the process, but the path that is taken is always modeled. At the other extreme of the spectrum, informal processes were called ad hoc workflows in the 1990s. They evolved into collaborating technologies, including email and instant messaging. The informal process is not modeled and cannot be easily tracked by the system. The participants in the process must agree on and understand the business goal and have enough information about how to achieve it. There is no process to follow, and the system does not know when the goal is achieved or when the process is started. These types of processes and technologies are useful for non-repetitive and one-of-a-kind assignments that do not need to be tracked or audited. Case management tries to achieve a balance between formal and informal processes by formalizing parts of the process. These parts are called process fragments or tasks. In addition, the system is aware of when the case starts and when it finishes so it can track and monitor the cases. In a case management system, the case workers are in control of how cases are processed. However, they do not need to know all of the details about how to achieve the goal, and the system can detect when it is achieved. The process fragments and tasks are available as tools for the case worker to use.

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Advanced Case Management with IBM Case Manager

Figure 1-2 shows aspects of the process spectrum and positions case management against formal and informal processes. It does not cover all aspects of case management, but it includes some of the aspects that are common with business process management.

Figure 1-2 Process spectrum

One aspect that is not shown in this figure is management and control. Within a case management system, this is an overarching aspect of a solution. For example, as shown in Figure 1-2, the line is drawn between “Process History important for auditing” and “Documents and recordings are critical to justify decisions” separating the nature of formal and informal processes. In contrast, case management has an overarching view on both sides of the spectrum concerning the case.

Chapter 1. Case management concept

13

1.4 The need for Enterprise Content Management
During the processing of a case, multiple documents can be produced and used by the various participants who interact to solve the case. Documents are a key part of any case management solution because knowledge workers depend on documents to complete their tasks. Case workers are no different, and so, while resolving a case, multiple documents can be created and used. These documents can be emails, text documents, spreadsheets, voice recordings, images, video clips, presentations, and others. All this information must be stored and organized as part of the case. This process requires cases to have a flexible and familiar containment mechanism, similar to a folder structure in a file system. However, a typical file system is not flexible enough to store case information. For example, a document might be used simultaneously in multiple cases, and therefore must be in each case folder. A change to the document must be reflected in all the cases. It also is important that metadata, version, and security are maintained so the complete history of the case is kept current and traceable. These requirements are achieved in case management solutions by using an Enterprise Content Management system to implement a case folder to collect the information that is related to the case. A case folder (and all its contents) is maintained after the case is complete for legal and compliance reasons. The retained case also can be used in future cases or for analysis across cases. A well-designed case management solution must include the design of the content management aspects, such as folder organization and document types, including metadata.

1.4.1 Information complexity
The amount of information or documents that is required to complete a case can be different for separate instances of the same case solution. Certain cases require more documentation or investigation than others, which means that cases can have different amounts of information. This complexity translates into case information complexity, which requires high levels of organization. Case documents and information are normally organized in a hierarchical containment structure that is similar to a traditional folder structure called a case folder. For example, a customer dispute case might have a folder structure as shown in Figure 1-3 on page 16. The folder structure is populated with the documents and files that are required to solve the case.

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Advanced Case Management with IBM Case Manager

A case can contain multiple documents of various types. To manage these documents, you must associate metadata with them. You also need content and metadata search capabilities. Finding information in a case is different from finding information in a database because that information might be inside documents that are stored in the case file. Case workers must easily find the information that they need to work on the case, even if it is buried inside documents. Enterprise Content Management systems make it easier to work with this complexity of information. The need to find case information is not important only for case workers who handle a single case instance. It also is important for participants, such as managers or analysts who deal with aggregations of case instances. These participants must extract patterns from case information. For example, they might want to determine the frequency that a particular pattern occurs in a collection of cases. In the credit card complaint solution, a manager might want to find the percentage of complaints that are filed for a particular product or a particular merchant. This information might be present only in the documents or emails that are contained in the cases.

1.4.2 Security
By using an Enterprise Content Management system to store case management content, including information and documents, you can maintain fine-grain access control over the information. It is common for cases to deal with sensitive information, so these documents must be protected from unauthorized access. In certain scenarios, even those working on the case should have limited access to the case information.

1.4.3 Retention
Case information is long-lived and can be subject to the lifecycle of content objects in an Enterprise Content Management system. In particular, when the processing of a case is completed, all of the case information remains and is still available for users with the correct security privileges. Therefore, cases can be reopened for processing or auditing, if required. Case information, including history and documents, can have regulatory compliance retention requirements. Cases often are implemented as a case folder (see Figure 1-3 on page 16) to collect all information and documents that are related to a particular case instance. The case folder is retained after case completion. Retaining case folders allows future cases to use the existing case information, and facilitates compliance with legal and regulatory requirements.

Chapter 1. Case management concept

15

For example, certain documents might need to be retained for five years, whereas others must be retained for 10 years. The case management system must enforce these regulatory compliance policies and satisfy audit requirements. Even when regulatory compliance is not required, the retention of case information is important for auditing purposes.

Figure 1-3 Example case showing partial case folder structure

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Advanced Case Management with IBM Case Manager

1.5 The need for collaboration
Case workers not only need information about the case to make decisions, but must collaborate with other participants in the case. Most of this collaboration is through the documents and information that is contained in the case folder. These items include case notes, extra documents that are added to the case, and decisions that are made. Other collaboration can occur through case worker communication. Case workers must communicate with others who are working the same case through case notes, instant messages, email, and phone conversations. Technology supporting a case management solution must provide these types of collaboration technologies. It also needs the capability to maintain the collaborations as part of the case folder for case resolution and audit purposes. Case management recognizes that not all the tasks, steps, or activities of a solution can be predefined. Therefore, case worker judgment and collaboration are used to resolve the case. In certain case solutions, negotiation and collaboration between case workers can be more important than imposing a fixed set of activities in a particular order. However, too much negotiation and collaboration can slow down the resolution of a case. Therefore, a balance must be achieved. In many situations, experienced case workers can achieve the correct balance. In other situations, business rules and analytics in the form of decision support can be used to help strike the correct balance.

1.6 Case management solutions
A case management solution provides the software environment for case workers to collaborate on the completion of cases. The solution can be modeled and deployed by using a case management system. The solution is implemented by using multiple technologies that include Enterprise Content Management, collaboration, business rules, IBM BPM, and others. A case management system is used to bring all of those technologies into a coherent framework. Although the case is the focus of a case management solution, the solution might be composed of multiple types of cases. For example, a customer complaint solution might have multiple types of complaints, depending on the product or service the customer is complaining about. Each type of complaint can be slightly different and can be managed by a different type of case worker. Therefore, a solution often is composed of one or more types of cases.

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Case management software solutions are appropriate for situations in which the work that must be accomplished is goal-oriented, knowledge-intensive, and highly collaborative. These types of solutions are based on documents, such as emails, faxes, pictures, and videos. These documents are required for the knowledge workers to make decisions that are based on their judgment. Case management provides the tools and collaboration environment for the knowledge workers to complete their cases. Case management solutions also are appropriate for work that involves complex decision making by knowledge workers that is based on the information and documents that are associated with case instances. Typical applications include exception handling, complaint or dispute management, contract management, lending applications, benefits enrollment, invoice processing, change request, and incident reaction. These types of solutions require the integration of capabilities from multiple technologies that include content management, IBM BPM, collaboration tools, social software, business rules, and analytics. The case paradigm is applicable in multiple industries and environments that include insurance, banking, healthcare, government, and utilities.

1.6.1 Case data
A case consists of a collection of information that is used to achieve a business goal. The first step in designing a case management solution is the identification of this information. This information is in addition to the folders, documents, and tasks. The case data defines what is needed for the case to be processed. This data can come from a number of sources, forms, documents, external systems, and user input. After it is collected, this data is maintained throughout the lifecycle of the case to allow the knowledge worker to process the case through completion. In addition, it should include data that is relevant for reporting and processing (tasks). A clear understanding of the data and its source is needed to design the solution. Understanding when and where to obtain the data, and how and where to update it is important. The data processing might be by a business task, a data entry window for the case worker to complete, or by external systems. In all cases, you want to keep the case data in the case folder for processing and archival purposes.

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1.6.2 Case folder
The natural way to organize case information is to use a case folder in an Enterprise Content Management system. The case folder can contain a folder structure with subfolders that contain documents, history, and other information that is used to process the case. In general, the case folder contains all the information that is used to process and manage the case. The case folder provides the context for the case workers to do their work. The information that is contained in the case folder can be categorized into the following types: Properties: Not all case information is contained in documents. There are discrete properties that identify the case and hold important status information about the case. These properties, such as the customer name, case priority, and account number, must be associated with the case folder. Documents: Case management is content-centric, and case workers as knowledge workers base their work on documents, including emails, text documents, pictures, and spreadsheets. The case folder provides the container to collect all the documents that are used in solving the case. Tasks: The case folder contains all of the tasks that can be used in the case, and each task contains state information. Some tasks might be waiting to be run or are running or completed. This state information and history must be preserved in the case folder. History: Everything that happens to the case and its content must be recorded as history. The case folder provides the container to keep that history. The history includes when the case was created, when documents and information were added, case comments, when tasks were started and completed, and so on. This collection of diverse and rich information is important to maintain in a central place for case consistency and integrity. That central container is the case folder. Having the case folder in an Enterprise Content Management system provides the governance, lifecycle management, searching capability, archival integrity, and security that is required. Case information is long-lived; therefore, after the case is completed, the case folder and its information can be maintained in the Enterprise Content Management system for future reference. Cases must react to what is happening in the case folder so new tasks can be run. New tasks might be needed when documents are added to the case, case properties are modified or based on case actions. Case workers in the correct role and with enough security privileges can view the state of the case tasks. These case workers also can disable, run, and add new tasks to the case.

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Figure 1-4 shows the basic functions of the case folder.

Figure 1-4 Case folder concept

1.6.3 Tasks
In a case management solution, tasks are tools the case workers use to process a case. The case worker or workers in charge of a case must decide which tasks must be run to complete the case. Depending on the modeling of the case solution, tasks might be started by the system or classified as required or optional. A case worker with enough privileges can start, disable, or add tasks, depending on the requirements of the current case instance. Figure 1-5 on page 21 shows the interface that a case worker can use to interact with the tasks in a case solution that is implemented with IBM Case Manager.

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Figure 1-5 Example of tasks available to the case worker

Well-known tasks can be defined as part of the modeling of the case solution. (Figure 1-1 on page 9 shows an example of such a model.) However, not all of the tasks are understood at modeling time. The case workers can add tasks when they are working a case. In case modeling, tasks introduce a higher level of abstraction than the process fragments. During the processing of an actual case, tasks introduce a higher level of control. Case workers with the correct privileges can see and control the tasks by using an interface similar to the one that is shown in Figure 1-5. Other case participants see work to be done in their role or personal in-baskets and might not have access to the high-level tasks. Tasks are not assigned to people; however, personnel assignments can be done in the process fragments implementing the tasks. Tasks can be nested and composed of other tasks. Tasks that contain other tasks are called container tasks. These tasks allow business analysts to organize case solutions into sets of tasks that might be required at different phases of the case. Neither Enterprise Content Management systems or BPM systems use tasks as implemented by case management systems. Therefore, flexible case solutions that use the task concept can be implemented only by using a case management system.

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Chapter 2.

Typical case management applications
This chapter addresses some of the typical solution patterns, in various industries, where case management can be used. It also explores a case management application example and the complaint management application in greater detail. This chapter contains the following sections: Typical applications Complaints management example use case

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2.1 Typical applications
As described in 1.1, “Case management overview” on page 4, some solutions are better-suited for case management than for other technologies. The need for case management emerges from the need to provide flexible solutions that are targeted for knowledge workers. These workers are more experienced and solve complex business processes. These workers require a complete view of the business process, including the properties, documents, roles, and activities necessary for successful resolution. These solutions traditionally were implemented by using business process management (BPM) or enterprise content management (ECM) technologies. These technologies are focused on subsets of the overall process that results in complex and expensive custom applications, which often cannot meet the flexibility that is needed by the knowledge workers. Historically, BPM and ECM solutions focused on process automation and the business process workers. Case management changes this focus towards the knowledge workers. The knowledge workers are more expensive resources and were poorly served by previous technologies. Their jobs involve complex decisions and the need for technology that can adapt to the changing business needs of each potential business object that they are working with. Knowledge workers also are faced with finding ways to more efficiently work with complex business situations. These knowledge workers require flexible software technologies to help solve these situations. Case management solutions equip knowledge workers with the tools they need to achieve their goals in a complex business environment. Companies benefit from providing these valuable resources with the tools to allow them to focus on the areas where their knowledge is best applied. The case management paradigm of having a case folder to contain all pertinent information and data that is required to solve a problem is used in multiple industries. In certain areas, there are industry-specific case patterns that are found, such as mortgage underwriting, insurance claims, or court case management.

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Many of these patterns are applicable across several industries to meet multiple situations. Examples include, customer complaints, investigations, or back-office operations, such as employee onboarding. Investigation (specifically fraud investigation), is a solution pattern that can be applied across many industries. For example, a customer inquiry into a banking account can trigger a fraud investigation. Another example is a government agency that is looking into the possibility of fraud within a disability claims case. These scenarios can lead to multiple related cases being created and tracked.

2.1.1 Solution patterns
Cases involve processes that vary from structured, repetitive, goal-oriented work to processes that are unstructured and unpredictable. Providing knowledge workers with the tools to solve this work with the necessary control and collaboration results in several solution patterns that can be used to define where case management solutions are used. Case management solutions are based on the following patterns: The identification of a business object that is the central focus of the process. This object is represented as a case folder that contains all of the properties, interactions, activities, and supporting content. The solution is designed for knowledge workers or experts to have access to the activities that are necessary to solve the business situation by using a combination of structured and unstructured approaches. The experience and judgment of the worker affect how the resolution is achieved. The use of event-driven activities where the arrival of documents or changes to the case starts an activity. For example, a bank customer filing out a dispute form might automatically start a credit card fraud investigation review activity. The use of non-predetermined activities as a major element of the solution, which allows knowledge workers and experts to add activities to the solution as needed. The use of rich content as part of the solution. Most complex business situations require multiple types of document content, including text documents, spreadsheets, presentations, video, and pictures. The need to provide collaboration technologies to support the knowledge workers and experts who are solving the business situation. The use of analytics for seeking patterns among real-time or historical data.

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2.1.2 Applications by industry
In today’s environment, Industries face many challenges. One of them is providing the tools and information for their valuable knowledge workers to focus on applying their critical skills to best meet the businesses needs. Ultimately, this translates to improved customer satisfaction, whoever that customer might be. Case management technology helps by providing a flexible environment where applications can be built that focus on the knowledge worker and decision makers within the organization. In addition to cross-industry patterns, each industry has specific processes that are well-suited for case management.

Government
Economic changes and the need to more efficiently respond to the needs of citizens forced government agencies to respond accordingly. Increasing demands for transparency and interoperation between agencies increased the need to implement solutions that can provide complete views of their processes and citizen interactions. Many government agencies are facing financial crises that are forcing them to seek more efficient and complete methods of providing services. The varied requests and services that are provided lend themselves to case management solutions. Some of the following challenges are commonly addressed: Benefit enrollment administration Grant request and administration Organizational license applications and renewals Criminal and civil investigations Citizen management Taxpayer management Court case management Investigations (criminal, fraud, and general) Citizen inquiries and complaints

Insurance
Increased competitiveness, regulation, and the frequency of growth through acquisition increased the needs for companies within the insurance industry to find solutions that can be deployed across the entire organization. The need to provide consistency within business processes became a focus that is coupled with the need to increase the ability of knowledge workers to perform effectively.

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Additionally, insurance companies find themselves with multi-faceted relationships with their customers. It becomes increasingly important for knowledge workers to have a complete view of the customer relationship when they are interacting. The ability to provide consistent applications for organizations that have grown through acquisitions becomes an essential business need. The following insurance industry challenges are ideal candidates for case-based solutions: Policy underwriting Policy maintenance Claim processing Auditing Customer inquiry Customer complaint Annuity management

Banking
The banking industry recently saw many changes because of increased regulation and the effects of the recent economic cycle. There was an increased level of attention towards the managing of and interactions with customers and implementing stricter enforcement of policies and capturing the activities supporting decisions. Increased attention to customer relationships resulted in more focus on consistency of service and providing knowledge workers with a complete view of the various aspects of any process that they are working. The efficient management of customer interactions or inquiries is as important as asset management. The following banking industry challenges are ideal candidates for case-based solutions: Loan underwriting Loan post close review Mortgage servicing Dispute resolution Customer inquiry Account opening and maintenance Credit/Debit card inquiry Loss mitigation Commercial lending Consumer lending Investment and wealth management

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Healthcare
The healthcare industry underwent dramatic changes with increasing government regulations, coupled with a growing need for healthcare services. These changes forced the industry to become more efficient. The nature of healthcare processes makes highly structured and rigid applications unusable, which imposes unnecessary constraints. The high percentage of knowledge workers in the industry and the challenges make many of the following processes ideal candidates for case-based solutions: Patient discharge Care coordination Healthcare fraud and abuse Clinical trials coordination Claims adjudication Member management Provider management

Utilities
The utilities industry, like many others, underwent changes in technology with many companies working to modernize their case management systems. With many manual and paper-based processes, they provide an open environment to apply case management solutions. As a highly regulated industry, the need to efficiently complete business processes is a high priority. With the large effect of increased weather-related incidents, the utilities industry discovered areas that require increased management and efficiency to handle these extreme variations. Case management solutions in the utilities industry address the following challenges: Rate case justification Claim management Post disaster management Permit request management Land rights management Property management

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2.2 Complaints management example use case
Throughout this book, an example that is based on complaints management is used to show the key aspects of the IBM Case Manager. Complaints management is used because it is a good fit for the Case Management paradigm. This section outlines a set of business requirements for this scenario. There are many types of complaints management systems, including handling service complaints, product complaints, and government-related complaints. The example that is used here is a simplified and relatively generic version so that it can be applicable to various different industries. Although intended to be realistic, it is fictitious and is intended for illustrative purposes only. It does not describe any exact processes or industry preferred practices. In the example scenario, a company sells products and provides various services. It has a centralized complaints management system that handles any issues from customers. A customer calls in to lodge a complaint and a representative completes a complaint form, which in turn creates the case that is used to track this complaint. The complaint case is first reviewed for validity and then is routed to a specialist, depending on the category of the complaint. The process of resolving the case does not necessarily take the same path every time. However, it almost always involves collecting documents, collaboration between individuals and teams, and tasks, such as reviews and investigations. Different tasks must be carried out depending on the nature of each complaint. The outcome of the case relies on the experience and judgment of the person who is working on the complaint case. That person is guided by the company rules and regulations. In this example, if the complaint is from a customer with a high rating, more tasks must be performed. The customer rating is based on business rules. This rating can depend on various different factors, such as transactions revenue, the number of previous complaints, and time of membership. In the real world, almost every case management system must be integrated to one or more external systems. The example shows how this configuration is supported through different integration points. Many companies have a team of analysts who are responsible for analyzing the historical patterns of the complaints and their outcomes. This process allows the company to gain a better insight of customer-related issues. By learning from previous complaints cases, the company improves not only its case processing, but its products and services. The optional Content Analytics component can be used to analyze the complaint data, comments from the case workers, and case documents across many complaint cases.

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For more information, see the previous version of this IBM Redbooks publication, Chapter 18, “Integration with IBM Content Analytics”. The previous version of the book can be found as part of the downloadable material that is associated with this book. For more information, see Appendix A, “Additional material” on page 563.

2.2.1 Complaint scenario
In the example, a company provides commercial products and services to many customers. The company realizes that customer complaints can be a gold mine of important information. They consider a complaint as valuable as any positive feedback, maybe even more so. They want to process these cases efficiently, and collect all of the feedback and related information centrally to support their continuous quality improvement processes. The company can receive complaints through the following methods: The customer calls the support line or a particular account representative to lodge a complaint. The customer emails the complaint to the company. The customer fills out an online form that is provided on the company website. The customer sends in a written complaint by mail or fax. The company has a Customer Relationship Management (CRM) system that manages all of the details about their customers. All complaints must be matched to a record in the CRM system, and the relevant information is added to the case so that it is available to the reviewer. The company uses a multi-dimensional system for rating its customers to help give a balanced view of the customer and support the customer communication processes. If a complaint is received from a high-value customer, the account manager for the customer is notified. The account manager then contacts the customer to assure them that the complaint is receiving attention. In some situations, the client manager or customer relationship staff also might suggest a different product to the customer as an alternative. From the case management perspective, this up-sell activity means that a separate set of tasks must be processed and tracked in the context of the case. Handling complaints can span many departments in the organization. The process often starts at the support contact center, and, depending on the nature of the issue, is categorized into an appropriate type: Product, Service, Billing, or Others. There are separate guidelines for the processing of each of these types of complaints.

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Based on the type of the complaint, specialists might need to review the case in detail. If the complaint is related to a safety issue, it must be routed to a special department that carries out the necessary investigations.

2.2.2 Resolving the case
The complaint review process starts upon receipt of the complaint and a review case is opened. The process ends and the case is closed when a final determination is made by the principal assigned reviewer and communicated back to the customer. Company policy requires a response to all complaints. The reviewer is responsible for finding a resolution in a timely manner. The first step is to screen the complaint. For spurious complaints, no further action might be needed, and the case is closed. All non-spurious complaints are reviewed by trained specialists who have a deep understanding of regulatory requirements and company policies and procedures. Reviewing product-related complaints requires a good understanding of the products and their components. In these cases, a specialist in the product department is assigned to review the case. If it is a non-product-related complaint, a specialist from the complaints department takes the case. The specialist collects all of the necessary documentation that is related to the case. This process might involve requesting more information from the customer or getting information from other systems inside the company. In complex cases, a small team of specialists might work on the case cooperatively. If a product safety issue is suspected at any point, a safety investigator is required to participate in the review and provide an assessment. After the final determination is made, the outcome is communicated back to the customer. Depending on the severity and complexity of the case, a formal report might be filed in the case folder. The specialist teams are led by their team managers. The managers are responsible for the monitoring of service levels, distribution of work, and ensuring correct operations by the teams. The managers have the authority to assign tasks and to reassign work from one member of the team to another.

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2.2.3 Content that is related to the case
As with most case management situations, handling complaints involves the collection of documentation that is related to the case. The documentation includes all forms of communication with the customer that is related to the complaint, internal review and investigative reports, and any documentation that is required for compliance purposes. The case reviewer is responsible for ensuring the completeness and consistency of the documentation. The information must be able to be used as evidence to support the decision-making process. Case information that is related to complaints is used by the Quality Review Board in their regular sessions. It also is used to support the analysis of trends and to help identify new issues and systemic discrepancies. The following types of documents might be collected as part of a complaint case: Complaint form: Standard form that is completed by the customer and sent through mail, email, or fax that describes details of the issue. Correspondence and supporting documents: Any written communication with the customer, including extra documents that are received, such as receipts, invoices, emails, and pictures. Reports: Internal reports from reviewers or investigators. Phone recording: Any phone calls that are recorded during the case. Contracts: Any updated or new contracts that involve product up-sell or service agreement changes. There are associated tasks that run automatically whenever certain types of documents are added to the case; for example, a review process when a new contract arrives.

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2.2.4 Integration with other systems
The following systems are involved in this example: The company Customer Relationship Management (CRM) system. Details about the customer’s account must be retrieved from the CRM system and added to the case information. The Customer Rating system. This rules system is used to calculate the customer rating. The rating is requested at the start of the case and added to the case information. The account managers portal. For high-rating customers, the appropriate account manager on the portal is sent a task to reach out to the customer. Analysis system. Case information, including all the documentation and comments, must be made available for analysis.

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Chapter 3.

IBM Case Manager overview
By using IBM Case Manager, you can manage structured and unstructured processes and content in dynamic, highly collaborative, and flexible ways. IBM Case Manager supports the agile methodology by providing an environment on which you can design, develop, validate, and test case solutions interactively. IBM Case Manager also provides a rich set of tools for administration, template management, and importing, exporting, and transferring case solutions to and among various environments. This chapter includes the following sections: IBM Case Manager capabilities IBM Case Manager environments IBM Case Manager components IBM Case Manager architecture IBM Case Manager configurations

© Copyright IBM Corp. 2013, 2014. All rights reserved.

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3.1 IBM Case Manager capabilities
IBM Case Manager provides capabilities for integrating content, processes, and people into a unified platform for building case management applications. This section describes the capabilities of IBM Case Manager, including content and process management, collaboration and social software tools, business rules, and analytics. For more information about licensing of IBM Case Manager components, see the following website and search for the term “Case Manager”: http://www.ibm.com/software/sla/sladb.nsf

3.1.1 Case design and deployment
By using IBM Case Manager, you can design and deploy case solutions that model real-world business solutions in any industry. Business analysts can use the Case Manager Builder interface to create case solutions, such as Claim Processing, Loan Processing, or Complaint Management in insurance and banking sectors, or solutions in any other industry. The solutions can then be easily deployed into the testing and production environments.

3.1.2 Case management
IBM Case Manager enables case workers to easily create cases, monitor their in-baskets for outstanding work, process case work, and browse and search cases. The user interface can be easily configured based on user roles and customized, depending on specific needs of managing cases of a particular type.

3.1.3 IBM Case Manager API
The IBM Case Manager API serves as the integration tier between IBM Case Manager components. For example, at design time, Case Manager Builder uses the API to fulfill the requests that are related to the deployment of a solution in the development environment for testing. At run time, Case Manager Client uses the API to create, run, and manipulate cases and tasks. Custom applications can use the IBM Case Manager API within custom widgets for the Case Manager Client or a new user interface. For system and solution administration, the IBM Case Manager administration client uses the API to deploy, administer, and manage solutions in the development, test, and production environments.

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3.1.4 Tools
IBM Case Manager provides various tools, such as IBM Case Manager administration client, Document Generator (DocGen), and precondition checker. Administrators and Business Analysts use these tools to configure and manage their case management system for optimal use.

3.1.5 Solution templates
Solution Templates help organizations to jump-start the process of developing case management solutions. The IBM DeveloperWorks website contains a set of templates for several lines of business applications. Business analysts can build solutions from these templates. The IBM Case Manager administration client tool provides support for creating solutions from templates or templates from solutions. The IBM Case Manager administration client also can be used to copy solutions. Solution templates contain a predefined set of artifacts. These artifacts include case metadata, roles, in-baskets, document types, page definitions, case types, properties views, business rules, and task definitions. They can be deployed into an IBM Case Manager environment. Solution templates capture preferred practices for a case management use case, and can be modified to fit the individual needs of an organization.

3.1.6 Content and process management
IBM Case Manager is built on top of a robust Content Platform Engine for content and process management. Content Platform Engine is part of the IBM Case Foundation platform. It allows case data and related content to be stored in an enterprise-level content repository. At the same time, its active content capability allows the system to automatically respond to important changes in any content object that is stored in the repository and performs operations, such as filing it in the appropriate case file, starting a case task for a case worker to work on the received document or create a case. Case tasks run as processes in Content Platform Engine to deliver work to case workers or external systems that are integrated to the solution. IBM Case Manager supports automatic, manual, and user-created case tasks.

3.1.7 Collaboration and social software tools
IBM Case Manager brings the power of collaboration to case management. This capability allows case workers to ask other knowledge workers or experts for advice in real time without leaving their case management environment. IBM Lotus® Sametime® Entry is seamlessly integrated into the IBM Case Manager Client and enables case worker to use instant messaging.

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3.1.8 Business rules
IBM Case Manager has an embedded rules engine that allows business analysts to add decision-making logic to a case solution directly within the IBM Case Manager Builder tool. Case Manager Builder includes two design tools for designing business rules, one text-based and one table-based.

3.1.9 Case analytics
By using IBM Case Manager, you can analyze, monitor, and report information at the case level. It enables case workers, line-of-business managers and business analysts to identify dynamic trends, and track the case and task processing. It also allows them to monitor key performance indicators (KPIs) or service level agreements (SLAs) in real time. This capability is part of the Case Analyzer component, which processes information from IBM Case Foundation.

3.1.10 Reporting
IBM Case Manager supports powerful reporting that is based on IBM Cognos® BI reports and Real Time Monitoring dashboards. You can customize reports to view historical and work-in-progress data that is generated by Case Analyzer by using online analytical processing (OLAP) cubes.

3.1.11 Content Analytics
IBM Case Manager uses IBM Content Analytics with Enterprise Search for text and content analysis. This capability enables knowledge workers to analyze the unstructured data within cases and identify statistically significant correlations. Content Analytics uses case documents, case comments, and case metadata for the analysis.

3.1.12 Forms integration
IBM Case Manager integrates with two form management components and products: IBM FileNet eForms and IBM Forms. This integration allows you to use customized, easy-to-use forms in your case solutions.

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3.2 IBM Case Manager environments
IBM Case Manager is built on top of the IBM Case Foundation platform. This configuration uses existing business process and content management to simplify the creation, deployment, testing, and management of case solutions. IBM Case Manager uses Content Platform Engine for creating and accessing case solution objects and provides workflow processing and task running within cases.

3.2.1 Environments and case management phases
IBM Case Manager supports three phases to accomplish end-to-end case management: design, test, and manage. To realize the three phases, IBM Case Manager supports three environments: development, test, and production. The case design tool (Case Manager Builder) is used in the development environment where the solution design phase takes place. After the design is finished, case solutions are deployed on the test system. The test environment is similar to a production environment, but it is used for user-acceptance testing or pre-production testing. This process is called the testing phase. Solutions then are deployed and run on a production environment, where the manage phase takes place.

Development environment
The development environment consists of the IBM Case Manager design object store and a target object store that is configured to include a workflow system. You can use the development environment to design, deploy, test, and refine case solutions before you move them into the test, pre-production, or production environment. In the design phase, you create a case solution for the business problem. Lay out all the necessary solution artifacts, such as properties, roles, in-baskets, solution pages, case types, properties layout views, business rules, tasks, and process workflows by using the IBM Case Manager Builder tool. The design object store contains all of the case solution artifacts that were created during the design phase by using Case Manager Builder. The target object store contains the deployed solution objects for testing. The development environment allows for distinct project areas, each with their own target object store and workflow region. The development environment supports multiple project areas to allow different business analysts to create their own solutions and reset their environments separately, if required.

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In addition, IBM Case Manager Builder allows collaborative development. Multiple users can edit a single solution at the same time. When a user edits an artifact, that artifact or set of artifacts are locked until the user commits changes.

Test environment
The test environment is similar to the production environment, but is used for user-acceptance, performance, and other pre-production testing. The test environment consists of a staging object store and a target object store that was configured to include a workflow system. However, it does not have Case Manager Builder because solutions are designed in the development environment only. Case solutions are deployed to the target object store by using the Case Manager administration client. Small test environments are sometimes configured to share resources with a development environment; for example, by using the same database or LDAP server. For the test phase, the solution artifacts in the development environment are migrated and deployed to the test environment. During testing of the solution, changes might be required. These changes must be made in the development environment and the updated solution must be migrated again into the test environment. After the iterative process of testing is complete and you are satisfied with the solution performance, you are ready to migrate the solution from the development environment to the production environment. You migrate Case Manager artifacts by using the IBM Case Manager administration client and FileNet P8 artifacts by using FileNet Deployment Manager tools. For more information about these tools, see 3.4.1, “Case Manager Builder” on page 55 and 3.4.2, “Case Manager Client” on page 55.

Production environment
The production environment is where the case solutions are deployed, run, and managed. The production environment consists of a staging object store and a target object store that are configured to include a workflow system. Similar to the test environment, It does not have Case Manager Builder tool. This environment often is separate from other environments so the production system is isolated from any testing problems. For the manage phase, the solution package and related artifacts are migrated and deployed from the development to the production environment. You migrate Case Manager artifacts by using the IBM Case Manager administration client and FileNet P8 artifacts by using FileNet Deployment Manager tools. They are then deployed to the target object store.

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Figure 3-1 shows the IBM Case Manager environments. The Case Manager administration client is used to export and import the solution package between the different environments. After successful testing, you deploy the solution to the production system. A case solution is always migrated from the development environment’s design object store to a test or production environment’s staging object store.

Figure 3-1 IBM Case Manager environments

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Explanation: Figure 3-1 on page 41 explicitly shows only the development and test (preproduction) environments because they differ in the way they are used. Case Manager supports having multiple environments. The extra environments often are more test environments that focus on dedicated aspects, such as performance or integration testing.

3.2.2 Solutions and deployment in development environment
Use the development environment to design your solutions. Solutions that are designed are in the IBM Case Manager design object store. Case Manager Builder is used to build solutions, start development deployments, and reset the target object store and region. The development environment provides project areas with their own target object stores and workflow isolated regions. Project areas help developers to limit the effects of resetting the test environment where the target object store and workflow isolated region are reinitialized, which deletes all solutions and other artifacts that were deployed. After the design cycle is finished and the solution is ready for testing, use IBM Case Manager administration client to migrate the solution package from the development environment to any preproduction and production environments. For more information about solution deployment, see IBM Case Manager 5.2 Deployment Guide, which is available at this website: https://www.ibm.com/developerworks/community/blogs/e8206aad-10e2-4c49-b 00c-fee572815374/entry/ibm_case_manager_5_2_solution_deployment_guide

3.3 IBM Case Manager components
This section describes all of the components that comprise IBM Case Manager. The core platform for IBM Case Manager consists of the Content Platform Engine and the IBM Content Navigator framework. The IBM FileNet P8 Platform was extended to include the IBM Case Manager native case object model. IBM Case Manager does not contain any process or content data. Instead, IBM Case Manager is an integration layer that is supported by a core FileNet P8 services layer. All data that is related to cases that are managed in IBM Case Manager solutions are stored in the Content Platform Engine repositories.

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Figure 3-2 shows the IBM Case Manager components, including customization components.

Figure 3-2 IBM Case Manager components

IBM Case Manager components can be divided into the following categories: Core components Customization components Customization extensions The IBM Case Manager extensions, which are shown in a red box in Figure 3-2, are not bundled with the IBM Case Manager license. These components must be licensed separately. Note: IBM Case Manager license provides unrestricted use of IBM Case Foundation. Cognos Real Time Monitor is bundled with Case Foundation. To enable its use, you must configure Case Analyzer services.

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3.3.1 IBM Case Manager core components
The following IBM Case Manager components provide core functionality for designing and processing case solutions: Case Manager Builder Case Manager Client Case Manager API Case Manager administration client Content Platform Engine Content Navigator FileNet Workplace XT Each of these components is described in this section.

Case Manager Builder
IBM Case Manager Builder is a web-based tool for business analysts to design and develop case management solutions to solve real-world business problems. With Case Manager Builder, business analysts create all Case Manager solution artifacts, such as properties, roles, pages, document types, properties layout views, rules, and tasks. You also can associate workflows and tasks. The tool also can deploy these artifacts to a pre-configured project area that consists of the target object store and workflow system isolated region within the development environment. Case Manager Builder creates a package of files that are known as the solution package. It uses the Case Manager API to deploy the artifacts that are defined in the solution package into the wanted project area. Case Manage Builder is used in the development environment to design and develop the solution. When the solution is ready for system-level testing, it is migrated and deployed into the test environment by using the IBM Case Manager administration client tool. Figure 3-3 on page 45 shows the Case Manager Builder home page that you see after you log in to Case Manager Builder. This page lists all of the available solutions in the design object store and their deployment status inside the development environment.

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Figure 3-3 Case Manager Builder home page

Case Manager Client
Case Manager Client is a web-based application that case workers use to create and process cases and collaborate with others. The IBM Case Manager Client is a widget application with a set of pages that are configured to work together. Business analysts design the views and in-baskets for case workers. They can use the predefined or customized pages with other widgets for specific roles and tasks. IBM Case Manager Client is integrated with IBM Content Navigator and provides an improved user interface. It follows IBM OneUI style to maintain a consistent user experience with IBM Content Navigator.

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Figure 3-4 shows a Case List page in the Case Manager Client for a Claim Management solution.

Figure 3-4 Case Manager Client for Customer Complaint Management solution

For more information about pages, see 4.1, “IBM Case Manager object model” on page 71 and 4.2, “Case object model implementation” on page 102.

Case Manager API
IBM Case Manager provides tools for building custom web applications. It is possible to use different extensions and APIs to extend the Case Manager Client by adding custom pages, widgets, actions, events, or services. Developers can use the following APIs to extend a case management client application: Case Manager JavaScript API Case Manager Java API CMIS for FileNet Content Manager

Case Manager JavaScript API
The IBM Case Manager JavaScript API is used to customize the case management client application and provide modeling classes that represent case management objects, such as solutions, case types, cases, and tasks. It also provides classes that represent components of the client user interface, such as page widgets, dialog boxes, toolbars, and menus. The Case Manager JavaScript API uses the Dojo toolkit, which is an open source JavaScript library for web development.

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Developers also use the IBM Content Navigator JavaScript API to customize the client application. The IBM Content Navigator JavaScript API includes more modeling classes and widget classes that can be used in the Case Manager application. The classes in the IBM Case Manager JavaScript API are divided into the following packages that are based on functionality: icm.model.package Contains the classes that represent objects in the Case Manager domain. These case management objects, which include solutions, cases, work items, and tasks, map to Content Platform Engine objects on the server. icm.action.package Represents actions that users can perform on case management objects. These actions can be added in toolbars or menus for a widget. icm.base.package Supports the definition of custom events, actions, page widgets, and constants. icm.dialog.package Contains classes that represent the dialog boxes that are used in Case Manager Client. icm.pgwidget.package Contains classes that represent page widgets that are provided by IBM Case Manager. icm.util.package Provides support for multiple widgets. icm.widget.menu package Represents the menus and toolbars that are used with page widgets.

Case Manager Java API
The IBM Case Manager Java API is used to build custom case management applications. These applications can create cases, gather information about case solutions, and start manual tasks. For more information about the Case Manager Java API and the dependencies with IBM Content Navigator JavaScript model to build custom case management applications, see 3.4.3, “Case Manager API” on page 55.

CMIS for FileNet Content Manager
The IBM CMIS for FileNet Content Manager allows a case management application to create and access case content that is stored in an object store.

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Developers use this development tool to perform tasks, such as querying for cases, creating a case, updating case properties, adding folders and documents to a case, and gathering metadata for case and document classes. CMIS REST API Java archive files are packaged with IBM Case Manager 5.2 but are deprecated in the future. CMIS is now included with IBM Content Navigator and is the recommended package to use in your custom case management applications.

Case Manager REST API
In Case Manager 5.2, the REST protocols are provided for compatibility with previous releases of IBM Case Manager. If you are developing a new custom case management application, use the JavaScript API that is provided with IBM Case Manager and IBM Content Navigator. For a full listing of the IBM Case Manager API capabilities, see the IBM Case Manager documentation. From IBM Case Manager 5.2 Information Centerclick Developing case management applications.

Case Manager administration client
The Case Manager administration client is a web-based application that is used to administer the case management system. It is developed as an IBM Content Navigator plug-in and follows the IBM OneUI style for user experience consistency. It manages and administers solutions, solution templates, project areas, and widget packages. With this tool, case administrators start the following wizards: Copy solutions Deploy solutions Import and Export solutions Convert solutions to solution templates Configure solution locks, security, and auditing Import and Export solution templates Manage project areas and target environments Register custom widgets

Content Platform Engine
IBM Case Manager uses the Content Platform Engine to maintain the design, staging, and target object stores. These object stores contain the solution-related files. The design object store maintains the solution package files that are created through Case Manager Builder. The staging object store maintains the solution package files that are migrated with the IBM Case Manager administration client. Each solution has its own folder to store its package of files.

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The target object store maintains the deployed objects of the solution. Case instances, task objects, and case documents are managed in the target object store. The Case Manager Client interacts with the target object store to create and process cases in the solution. In addition to storing the solution-related files, the Content Platform Engine was upgraded with the following features to support IBM Case Manager: Task The task class is a Content Platform Engine base class. An instance of the Task class represents a piece of work in a case. CaseType This class is implemented as a subclass of the Case Folder class (CmAcmCaseFolder). Content activity monitoring Content activity monitoring is an extension of the Content Platform Engine auditing framework with which you can monitor and analyze property changes. Case object model The Case object model provides add-ons for the design and target object store metadata, code modules, and subscriptions for handling events from cases. In addition to the preceding features, the Content Platform Engine also provides support for the documents, folders, annotations, and pages that are needed to process a case. The Content Platform Engine’s workflow system supports IBM Case Manager mainly in the following areas: Designing the solution in Case Manager Builder: – Support for creating roles, in-baskets, tasks, and workflows that are associated with case management solutions. – Support for workflow authoring in Case Manager Builder. – Support for sharing existing workflows in solution packages by using Process Designer and associating them with Case Type tasks. – Support for offline validation of workflows in Case Manager Builder. – Support for augmented solution authoring in Process Designer, which also is known as round-tripping authoring.

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Running cases in Case Manager Client: IBM Case Manager uses the workflow system of the Content Platform Engine to process work items for tasks that are associated with a case instance. This process includes provisioning roles and corresponding in-baskets that contain the workflow steps to be completed by case workers. The workflow system also provides the capability to retrieve, manipulate, and update case instance properties during the running of work items.

FileNet Workplace XT
IBM Case Manager release 5.2 has a dependency on FileNet Workplace XT for the following functions: In the development environment, WorkplaceXT enables access to Process Designer to support the workflow round-tripping between Process Designer and Case Manager Builder. Additionally, it allows the developer to define form policy templates for the case solution if this kind of form behavior is required. In the production environment, WorkplaceXT is not required unless the case management solution is using form policy templates.

3.3.2 IBM Case Manager optional components
The following components are bundled and integrated with IBM Case Manager as customization components: IBM Case Analyzer IBM Case Monitor and Cognos Real-time Monitor IBM FileNet eForms IBM Sametime IBM Content Analytics with Enterprise Search Although these components are integrated with IBM Case Manager, they are not essential for solution authoring or execution. However, they can add great value and power to IBM Case Manager solutions. Tip: Some of these optional components are licensed on a limited use basis. For more information, see the licensing terms in the documentation. Although Cognos BI is not included, Case Analytics reports can be loaded and viewed in the Cognos BI report studio.

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IBM Case Analyzer
IBM Case Analyzer services generate real-time and historical data for case events that arew based on content and Content Platform Engine’s workflow system events. This real-time and historical data is used by Case Monitor and Cognos Real-Time Monitor to monitor and run trend analysis for current cases. In addition, you can use Case Analyzer services to output data to Microsoft Analysis Services and to report on long-term trends by using pre-defined Microsoft Excel reports or Cognos Business Intelligence reports that can be customized to suit your business needs.

IBM Case Monitor and Cognos Real-Time Monitor
IBM Case Monitor Operational Dashboard integrates with Cognos Real-time Monitor, which uses the real-time and historical data that is generated by the Case Analyzer services. Case Monitor Operational Dashboard is used to monitor and run trend analysis for case data. It allows you to define dashboards for different roles that can monitor critical parameters, such as execution cycle times or in-basket queue depth. You also can define watermarks and actions to be taken when a watermark is exceeded.

IBM FileNet eForms
IBM FileNet eForms integration provides electronic form function in IBM Case Manager. You can use a customized form as the user interface for displaying data in a task workflow step and for viewing case properties. eForms facilitates sophisticated data entry capabilities, graphical layout options, intelligence (such as calculations and parameter validation), data submission, and lookup.

IBM Sametime
By using IBM Sametime, case workers can collaborate while processing cases, including starting instant messaging sessions with others who are working on the case.

IBM Content Analytics with Enterprise Search
IBM Content Analytics with Enterprise Search supports crawling of structured and unstructured data of cases. Content Analytics contains a crawler for mining case data for analysis and for finding document content, case comments, and case data that is related to individual cases. You can use IBM Content Analytics with Enterprise Search to explore correlations between unstructured and structured case content with case data. For example, you can search for patterns that repeat for cases that show an unusually long processing time.

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3.3.3 IBM Case Manager extensions
IBM Case Manager supports integration with following products as extensions: IBM Business Process Manager (IBM BPM) IBM Content Manager IBM Operational Decision Manager (IBM ODM) IBM Forms These extensions are not bundled with the IBM Case Manager product and are separately licensed. For more information about product licensing, see this website: http://www.ibm.com/software/sla/sladb.nsf

IBM Business Process Manager
The integration of IBM Case Manager with IBM Business Process Manager (IBM BPM) provides business analysts with an easy way to associate IBM BPM processes to case solutions in Case Manager Builder. IBM Case Manager administration client provides a task on the configured IBM PBM Server with IBM Case Manager. While you are designing a solution, Case Manager Builder looks for a process application on IBM BPM Server with the same name as the solution name. It associates this application to the case solution by using the default snapshot. Also, Case Manager Builder provides an enhanced user interface for task editing. By using this interface, you can associate process definitions of the process application to Case Type tasks. Solution deployment checks and validates the process application, snapshot, and property mappings against the settings in the IBM BPM Server. A new Content Platform Engine event handler manages starting snapshots on IBM BPM Server and propagates property information that is based on the defined mapping. At run time, a process instance starts when the corresponding task is started in Case Manager Client. When the process instance ends, it updates the corresponding output parameters to mark the task complete. For more information about configuring IBM BPM with IBM Case Manager, see Chapter 17, “Integrating with IBM Business Process Manager” of the previous version of this IBM Redbooks publication. This version of the book can be found as part of the downloadable material that is associated with this book. For more information, see Appendix A, “Additional material” on page 563.

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Note: The integrated inbox feature, as described in section 17.4 of the previous book, is no longer available as of Version 5.2 of IBM Case Manager.

IBM Content Manager
The integration of IBM Case Manager with IBM Content Manager allows you to use content that is stored in IBM Content Manager repository for access in case solutions. The integration allows any existing IBM Content Manager content repositories to work with IBM Case Manager seamlessly. IBM Content Manager content remains in its repository and does not need to be moved or federated to FileNet P8. Case documents are created in IBM Content Manager. Configuring IBM Content Manager with Case Manager is easy by using the provision of connection definition in the project area. Use Case Manager Builder to define IBM Content Manager item type document dependency and preconditions on Case Types and tasks. Event handlers are available in IBM Content Manager and IBM Case Manager to exchange events between repositories. For more information about configuring IBM Content Manager with IBM Case Manager, Chapter 15, “Integration with IBM Content Manager” of the previous version of this IBM Redbooks publication. The previous version of the book can be found as part of the downloadable material that is associated with this book. For more information, see Appendix A, “Additional material” on page 563.

IBM Operational Decision Manager
The integration of IBM Case Manager with IBM Operational Decision Manager allows you to manage complex business rules for processing cases. This integration also allows you to separate the definition and evaluation of business rules from the definition of tasks workflows. By using IBM Operational Decision Manager, you can define business rules and maintain them outside of the Case Manager solution application. This allows you to change the business rules without requiring redeployment and testing of the solution.

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3.4 IBM Case Manager architecture
This section describes the high-level architecture of IBM Case Manager and the interaction between various components, as shown in Figure 3-5.

Figure 3-5 IBM Case Manager high-level architecture

Specifically, this section describes the protocols, communication data, and artifacts for the following applications: Case Manager Builder Case Manager Client IBM Case Manager API Content Platform Engine

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3.4.1 Case Manager Builder
The Case Manager Builder client runs in a browser and communicates with the server application by using HTTP protocol with JavaScript Object Notation (JSON) payload. For certain tasks (such as deployment), it directly starts the IBM Case Manager API by using HTTP. Case Manager Builder creates solution files in the design object store by using the Content Engine Java API.

3.4.2 Case Manager Client
Case Manager Client is built on top of IBM Content Navigator as a plug-in so that there is a consistency among clients for various IBM ECM products.

3.4.3 Case Manager API
The IBM Case Manager UI is based on IBM Content Navigator and provides developers with the following set of JavaScript APIs to develop custom widgets to enhance your case solutions: IBM Content Navigator Model layer API IBM Content Navigator Visual widget API IBM Case Manager Model layer API IBM Case Manager Page widget API These JavaScript APIs allow developers to easily extend IBM Content Navigator and IBM Case Manager functionality. The APIs also include the following benefits: Separation of business logic and User Interface The model layer clearly partitions the business logic from the UI layer Shared model object Model objects that contain business and server side objects can be shared across widgets, including custom widgets Reusable components Reuse visual widgets from the IBM Content Navigator widget library to build more complex custom UI widgets and dialogs, and reuse and extend IBM Case Manager page widgets for customization.

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IBM Content Navigator JavaScript Model layer API
The non-visual JavaScript model API defines the client side model for IBM Content Navigator. The modeling classes define the communication with the mid-tier services and provide the data, server interaction APIs, and support caching. Data in the content servers (such as IBM FileNet P8 and IBM Content Manager) is stored as model objects and are used by the UI widgets.

IBM Content Navigator JavaScript Visual widget API
This toolkit provides the generic UI widgets, panes, and dialogs for performing content and workflow related operations. This visual widgets library is based on Dojo and IDX.

IBM Case Manager Model Layer API
The IBM Case Manager JavaScript API set is an extension of the IBM Content Navigator APIs and includes model classes that represent case management objects, such as solutions, case types, cases, and tasks. They communicate with mid-tier services through a navigator plug-in. As with the navigator model API and services, the public API is the JavaScript Model API; however, the plug-in services are not public API. These model classes provide functionality that is not possible to achieve through the navigator API alone. Figure 3-6 shows the model object layer.

Figure 3-6 IBM Case Manager Model object layer

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The model API provides the following functionality: Retrieve the deployed solutions Solutions that are deployed to any target object store are registered with the navigator desktop. For a particular solution: – – – – Retrieve the case type or document types Retrieve information about the properties across all case types Retrieve the roles Retrieve the static pages to show for a particular role

For a particular case type: – Attributes (the rights the user has to cases of that case type, whether dynamic tasks are supported, and the default view definition to use when editing cases for this type) – Retrieve information about properties of the case type – Retrieve discretionary task types that can be created – Discover the particular page to use for a page type and role – Search for dynamic tasks compatible with this case type For case objects: – Retrieve a particular case or obtain a case model object, given a Navigator ContentItem – Create a case – Update the properties of a case – Split a case – Relate cases together – Retrieve the cases that are related to a case – Add and retrieve comments on cases – Retrieve the case history – Retrieve the tasks that are associated with a case For task objects: – – – – Start a manual task Enable and disable certain tasks Stop and restart the workflow that is associated with a task Create a discretionary task

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Create dynamic (custom) tasks: – Update the data that describes the dynamic task and validate the data – Start a dynamic task, causing a dynamic workflow to be created and started Work items: – Retrieve a particular work item or obtain a Case Manager WorkItem, given a Navigator WorkItem – Lock or unlock the work item – Save or complete the work item – Update the step parameters when saving or completing the work item

IBM Case Manager Page widget API
The IBM Case Manager visual layer APIs provide classes that represent page widgets (Case Search, Case List, in-baskets, and so on), dialogs (Comments and Reassign), and Actions that are configured on toolbars and menus. Figure 3-7 shows the overall architecture for the IBM Case Manager Client.

Figure 3-7 Case Manager Client architecture

If the built-in case widgets do not provide the required functionality for your case solution, developer can create custom widgets and pages to satisfy individual requirements.

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Page widget
An IBM Case Manager Page widget is a particular visual component that contains UI and business logic. It relies on IBM Content Navigator and IBM Case Manager model layers for data interaction. Usually, page widgets make available configurable preferences for Business Analyst to customize. Page widgets are reusable. These widgets are self-contained and perform only a single responsibility. A page widget is a Dojo dijit, an event endpoint, and a container of actions.

Page
An IBM Case Manager Page is a visual component that is composed of several page widgets, which work together to fulfill larger functions. The page controls the layout of page widgets, set up of the event wiring between page widgets, and services as an event broker routing the event from publisher to handler. Unlike IBM Content Navigator visual components, page is no longer an MVC unit, there is not a centralized controller between page widgets. They work together by using unidirectional communication (event) and bidirectional communication (coordination). If a page widget does not fit to a custom solution in a page, it can be replaced by a custom page widget. A page also is a Dojo dijit and consists of the following parts: A page digit class inherits from IBM Case Manager/container/AbstractICMPage An html template embeds page widgets in by using data-dojo-type with their configuration in data-dojo-props. a JSON format configuration file contains the configuration of page title, event wiring, and disabled broadcast events

Container widget
An IBM Case Manager container widget is the content pane of the case feature. It provides a selector for the user to select a solution and role. The container shows the pages that are associated with the role in a tab container. By default, there are cases and work pages. Users can start working from these pages, starting cases, and work items in new pages for further processing.

Event
An event is the mechanism that provides the unidirectional communication means from one page widget to another page widget (or container). The Case Manager Client supports event broadcasting, event wiring, and publishing event cross pages. The event mechanism is built on top of dojo/topic APIs, with more scope to limit the event publish/subscribe inside a page rather than global.

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Coordination
Coordination mechanisms provide the bidirectional communication means between page widgets. A coordinator sets up a sequence of coordination topics (for example beforeSave, Save, and afterSave) by step function, and registers callback and errback to be called when all participants complete their work. After, the coordination topics are started in the order that is defined by the steps.

3.4.4 Content Platform Engine
Content Platform Engine accepts both HTTP and Internet Inter-ORB Protocol (IIOP) requests from its clients. IBM Case Manager uses Java APIs to store, retrieve, and update solution artifacts, solution metadata, and case instances and manage process metadata and work items.

3.5 IBM Case Manager configurations
This section describes configurations for the following types of IBM Case Manager environments: Development environment configuration Production environment with high availability Production environment with high availability and solution partitioning

3.5.1 Development environment configuration
IBM Case Manager development environments normally consist of single instances of each component. No hardware-based load balancing, server-level clustering, or IBM WebSphere® ND clustering is required. For development environments, installing IBM HTTP Server (IHS) to front the IBM Case Manager WebSphere Application Server profile is optional.

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Figure 3-8 shows the IBM Case Manager and FileNet P8 components that make up the development environment.

Figure 3-8 Logical view of IBM Case Manager development environment

This environment consists of the following objects: WebSphere Application Server profile: – Content Platform Engine – IBM Content Navigator: • • IBM Case Manager Client plug-in IBM Case Manager administration client plug-in

– IBM Case Manager Builder – FileNet Workplace XT External infrastructure components: – – – – Relational database management system (RDBMS) Content storage subsystem LDAP Directory Server IBM Case Manager configuration tool

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For more information about the hardware and software requirements for IBM Case Manager and the underlying IBM FileNet P8 Platform, see IBM FileNet P8 Hardware and Software requirements, which is available at this website: http://www.ibm.com/support/docview.wss?rs=3278&uid=swg27013654 Important: The IBM Case Manager applications must all be in the same WebSphere Application Server profile. The IBM Case Manager configuration tool does not run under WebSphere Application Server, but must be installed on the same server as the IBM Case Manager applications. The IBM Case Manager WebSphere Application Server profile and FileNet P8 components (Content Platform Engine) can be collocated and run on a single server. Alternatively, they can be separated and run on multiple servers. The servers can be physical servers or guest hosts that run on supported virtualized platforms. The IBM Content Navigator and IBM Case Manager must be on the same WebSphere Application Server ND cluster. The FileNet Workplace XT component must be on a different WebSphere Application Server ND cluster. The IBM Case Manager WebSphere Application Server profile that is shown in Figure 3-8 on page 61 contains the following applications: Case Manager Builder A solution builder tool that is deployed only in the development environment. IBM Case Manager run time (also known as the Case Manager Client) The runtime environment that is used for starting, processing, and interacting with cases. This run time is deployed in the development and production environments as a Content Navigator plug-in. Content Navigator Case Manager Client uses the IBM Content Navigator framework and provides extended document viewing capabilities, such as rendition and annotation support for office documents and PDF. It also can provide side-by-side viewing of multiple documents in the same viewer. Case Manager administration client also uses the IBM Content Navigator framework. FileNet Workplace XT FileNet Workplace XT is required for development purposes if the solution uses P8 eForms policies and entry templates. FileNet Workplace XT is not required for a production environment. Integration Tier Application (also known as IBM Case Manager API)

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The communication layer between components of the IBM Case Manager applications. It also provides you with the ability to customize standard capabilities.

3.5.2 Production environment with high availability
The example configuration describes the topology of a sample production IBM Case Manager environment that is configured for high availability. It is focused only on configurations that are specific to IBM Case Manager. IBM Case Manager production environments differ from development environments in the following ways: The Case Manager Builder application is not installed or used in a production environment. Solutions can be designed in the development environment only. The solution package must be migrated from the development FileNet P8 domain to the production FileNet P8 domain by using IBM Case Manager administration client. In a development environment, Case Manager Builder is used to deploy solutions. In a production environment, IBM Case Manager administration client or IBM Case Manager configuration tool is used. Solutions cannot be modified in the production environment. Changes to solutions can be made only in a development environment. Production IBM Case Manager environments can contain DMZs, hardware load balancers, HTTP servers (IHS), and WebSphere Application Server ND clustering. Connection strings that map to multiple instances of the application are required for the following URLs: – Content Engine EJB – IBM Case Manager API – Case Manager Client IBM Case Manager WebSphere Application Server clusters require a network share directory (NFS mount) that is accessible to all of the nodes in the cluster. This share directory contains files that are needed by IBM Case Manager API for globalization, pages, and other resources. These files are needed when the IBM Case Manager deployment profile is created. Production IBM Case Manager environments can use FileNet P8 distributed deployment and domain partitioning configuration options. The LDAP security configuration for production solutions is more restricted than the development environment. Production environments can use a different LDAP than development. The LDAP is tied to the FileNet P8 domain that hosts the IBM Case Manager production domain.

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Production environments can contain a secure DMZ-fronting IBM Case Manager. A single FileNet P8 domain is used for the development of a Case Manager solution. Production environments usually consist of an independent FileNet P8 domain (different from the development FileNet P8 domain). In some situations, it is possible to have production environments with multiple FileNet P8 domains to completely isolate production environments, although each FileNet P8 domain requires its own staging object store and contains one or more target environments. Figure 3-9 shows a production IBM Case Manager environment with built-in redundancy for each component to provide higher availability. The figure does not include the optional Case Manager components.

Figure 3-9 Overview of a highly available Case Manager environment

Case worker clients connect to the Case Manager Client URL to log in and interact with cases. In a highly available IBM Case Manager WebSphere Application Server profile, there are two or more instances of IBM Content Navigator (Content Navigator Case Manager Client plug-in) application that are running. Load balancing and failover for the IBM Content Navigator application instances are achieved by using WebSphere Application Server Network Deployment for this application cluster, fronted by a load balancer.

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This solution often is IBM HTTP Server (IHS) or a hardware-based device. Case Worker client connections require session persistence. This means that the load balancing mechanism must support session affinity or “sticky sessions”. This session persistence ensures that clients are always directed to the same IBM Content Navigator instance resource, which is initially chosen to receive the traffic. In an IBM Case Manager environment, the Enterprise JavaBeans (EJB) and web services interface are used to interact with the Content Platform Engine. For more information about high availability and scalability for the Content Platform Engine, see this website: http://www.redbooks.ibm.com/cgi-bin/searchsite.cgi?query=filenet

3.5.3 Production environment with partitioning
Some IBM Case Manager implementations require that individual solutions be segregated within a single production FileNet P8 domain or be isolated into separate FileNet P8 domains. This section describes some sample configurations for IBM Case Manager that show separation options for individual solutions. When you are planning IBM Case Manager solutions, remember the following considerations: Estimated number of solutions and case workers Anticipated number of concurrent solution designers Do Line of Business require dedicated environments, or can shared target environments be used? Does each dedicated environment require a different LDAP Directory Service repository? In terms of software maintenance, is it acceptable to have multiple environments that need patching and updating? In terms of operational considerations, is the ability to stop, start, and backup IBM Case Manager solutions independently a requirement? The simplest configuration is to host all IBM Case Manager solutions in a single target environment. In this type of configuration, all of the solutions are deployed to a single target object store and share a single isolated region.

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Figure 3-10 shows a single FileNet P8 domain with three solutions being deployed from the DOS stage object store to the TOS1 target object store. The global configuration database (GCD) also is shown.
Global configuration Database

GCD Database schema TOS1 Region1 Target Environment Deploy Solution C Solution B Solution A Staging Area DOS

Figure 3-10 One target object store hosting three IBM Case Manager solutions

Instead of having all the IBM Case Manager solutions in a single shared target environment, each solution can be deployed into a separate target environment. In this configuration, each solution is provided with a dedicated target object store and workflow system isolated region. This configuration provides data separation between the solutions, which provides more flexibility for database operations and maintenance. In this scenario, it is possible to configure each target environment with their own LDAP Directory Server repository to isolate the security between solution spaces. To accomplish this, your P8 domain must be configured with federated LDAP repositories. You configure each target environment to point to a specific LDAP realm.

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Figure 3-11 shows this type of configuration.
Global configuration database Database schema TOS1 Region1 Solution A DOS Database schema TOS2 Region2 Deploy Deploy Deploy GCD

Staging Area

Solution B

Database schema TOS3 Region3

Solution C

Figure 3-11 Multiple target object stores with one solution in each

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If you want total solution separation, each solution can be deployed into its own FileNet P8 domain. Figure 3-12 shows this type of configuration in which the databases for all three domains are hosted by the same DB2® instance.
Global configuration database

GCD1
Database schema TOS1 Region1 Target environment ICM administration client

Deploy DOS1
Solution A

Staging Area Global configuration database

GCD2
Database schema TOS2 Region2 ICM administration client

Deploy
Solution B

DOS2
Staging Area

Target environment Global configuration database

GCD3
Database schema TOS3 Region3 Target environment ICM administration client

Deploy
Solution C

DOS3
Staging Area

Figure 3-12 Dedicated FileNet P8 domain for each IBM Case Manager solution

It also is possible to host the databases for each domain in separate instances or database servers. This type of deployment provides the most flexibility for production environments. Note: When dedicated P8 Domains are used for each IBM Case Manager solution, each P8 Domain must have their own distinct IBM Case Manager server instance.

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4

Chapter 4.

Inner workings of IBM Case Manager
If you plan to develop customized IBM Case Manager solutions, a good understanding of the inner workings of IBM Case Manager is vital. This understanding also is useful when you are troubleshooting IBM Case Manager solutions. This chapter describes the inner workings of IBM Case Manager. It addresses the IBM Case Manager object model and the way it uses the internal services from the IBM FileNet Content Platform Engine. This chapter also describes the integration with the IBM Content Manager from the data model perspective. This chapter includes the following sections: IBM Case Manager object model Case object model implementation IBM Case Manager pages Tasks and associated workflow processes Object model for IBM Content Manager integration

© Copyright IBM Corp. 2013, 2014. All rights reserved.

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Important: In this chapter, it is assumed that you are familiar with IBM FileNet P8 Platform. If you are not familiar with this platform, see the following Redbooks and product information center: IBM FileNet P8 Platform and Architecture, SG24-7667 IBM FileNet Content Manager Implementation Best Practices and Recommendations, SG24-7547 Introducing IBM FileNet Business Process Manager, SG24-7509 IBM FileNet Business Process Manager was renamed to IBM Case Foundation. IBM FileNet P8 Platform main information page at this website: http://www.ibm.com/software/ecm/filenet

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4.1 IBM Case Manager object model
IBM Case Manager object model consists of the solution, case type, task, external process, step, document type, and role. Figure 4-1 shows the IBM Case Manager object model.
Solution Case type Task External process

Step

Document type

Page

Role

View

Figure 4-1 IBM Case Manager object model

There can be many solutions in an IBM Case Manager system. For example, you can have one for Complaints Management, one for Human Resource Case Management, and one for the Legal Department. Each solution can handle various case types. For example, the Complaints Management system must handle customer complaints, internal employee complaints, and customer feedback. The solution might have a case type for each of these inputs. Each solution has various metadata definitions (properties), document types, and roles. Each case type can have a number of tasks. A task has one or more steps that must be completed. A task also can start external processes from IBM Business Process Manager. For example, a task in the Complaints Management use case might be to review a product-related complaint.

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A role represents a specific business function. For example, in the Complaints Management system, a role might be a Reviewer or Investigator. You assign users or groups of users to a role. People with different roles can access cases in different ways, and roles are assigned to run a particular step in a task.

Document types help you to organize and classify the documents that belong to a case. You can provide more information about the documents by assigning properties to the document type. For example, a document type in the example might be a complaint letter. Different types of cases can access different types of documents. Documents often are used by the case workers while they process task steps.
The following sections describe each entity within the IBM Case Manager object model.

4.1.1 Solution
A solution consists of a user interface with document types, property types, case types, and tasks. For example, a solution in a Complaints Management system might include the following case types: Customer complaints Internal employee complaints Customer feedback The different types of cases within this solution are related, but have different tasks that must be completed to complete the case. Roles are defined at the solution level so that case workers with roles in this solution can handle different case types within it. The case types all use similar document types (such as a complaint letter) and properties (such as the date when the complaint was received).

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Figure 4-2 shows the solution components.

Solution
1 n n n n n n

Case Type
1

Page

Document Type n Role n 1 n

n

n n n n

Folder
1

Task
1 1

In-Basket

n

Rule View

Process

Property n 1

n

n

Choicelist

Figure 4-2 Solution model

Each IBM Case Manager solution has a solution prefix to provide unique identification in an object store and workflow system isolated region. Case Manager Client represents a solution in which users log in to manage and process their cases. The solution contains the pages for case and step data. These pages are known as Case pages and Step pages. The pages display user interface widgets that allow users to view in-baskets of available work, process work, and search for cases. A solution is represented in a target object store as a folder of type Deployed Solution (CmAcmDeployedSolution). The deployed solution folder contains definitions for case types and their instances. The name of the deployed solution folder is the solution name. For more information about the CmAcmDeployedSolution class, see the IBM Case Manager V5.2 Information Center and click Developing case management applications  Content Platform Engine add-on extensions for Case Manager Builder  IBM Case Manager target object store extensions  Folder subclasses  Deployed Solution class.

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A solution is represented as an application space in an isolated region. An application space contains the roles and their in-baskets. A roster is defined in an isolated region for each solution. The application space name is the solution name. The roster name is a normalized version of the solution name to conform with the naming convention for a roster in the process services of the Content Platform Engine.

Solution package
A solution package is a set of files and folders that are the artifacts of a solution. Figure 4-3 shows the solution package content.
Solution Definition Property Choice List Document Type Case Type Folders Task Task Task Task Configuration Role In-Basket
May call another workflow

XPDL Workflow Workflow Reuse Workflow Workflow

Collection XPDL Base Workflow Workflow

Created by P8 Process Designer

Pages Page

Views View

Rules Rule Solution folder

Figure 4-3 Solution package

A solution package contains the following files and folders: Solution Definition File (SDF) The SDF contains definitions of property types, document types, case types, and task types that are used in the solution. Process Engine Configuration File The Process Engine Configuration File defines the workflow system configuration for a solution. The file contains definitions for the application space, roster, event logs, queues, in-baskets, and roles.

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Case Type Workflow Definitions (Case XPDL) The XML Process Definition Language (XPDL) is a collection of workflows that are associated with each case type. Case Manager Builder creates a separate XPDL file for each case type. Each task in a case type corresponds to a workflow in the XPDL. The XPDL file also can contain zero or more workflows that are not associated with a task. These workflows can be used by any task workflow in the XPDL file. For the task with reused workflow, Case Manager workflow inherits the original workflow that was imported in the solution workflow collection. Solution Workflow Process Collection (Collection XPDL) The XPDL contains the reusable IBM Case Foundation workflow definitions. These definitions are created by using FileNet Process Designer. They can be used as a “Reuse workflow” in the solution if their base class is changed to CaseWorkObject. Pages folder The pages folder contains page objects that represent the Case Manager Client user interface layouts (pages). Case Manager Builder creates the page objects for the default pages when the solution is created to display a list of available page layouts for task steps, role-based solution views, and for role-based case detail views. These page files are stored as content for each page object. Views folder The views folder includes a subfolder for each case type that contains view objects. The view objects represent the layout of the Properties widget. By default, a system-generated view is available in each case type. The system-generated view provides an ordered list of all the case type properties. View files are stored as content on the view objects. Rules folder The rules folder contains the rule files for each rule that is created in any case type under a solution. There are two different types of rules that are supported in Case Manager Builder: text-based rules and decision table-based rules. Both of these rule categories are stored in different formats. The text-based rules are stored in a text format and the decision table-based rules are stored in an XML format. The rule files are stored under separate case type folders in the rules folder. In addition to these artifacts, there might be more artifacts that are included in a solution package, such as forms and document templates.

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4.1.2 Case types
A case type defines the tasks and the document types that are needed to support them, and the steps to solve a particular business problem. The definition of a case type also includes the case folder structure and allocation of solution properties that are displayed to case workers in the Case Manager Client. A case is an instance of a case type. A case type has the following items: A collection of properties that become case folder properties. A collection of property views that specify the properties that Case Manager Client displays in the case widgets. A folder structure for storing documents. A collection of rules that can be used in a task to determine process routing or to update case properties. A collection of tasks to specify business processes and process data. A page layout that specifies which Client widgets to use to create cases, view cases, and split cases at run time. (Optional) A custom task page layout that specifies which Client widgets to use to view the work item of a custom task at run time. (Optional) An initiating document type. In an IBM Case Manager system, users can create a case instance directly from the Case Manager Client user interface or by adding a document of the initiating document type. Consideration: When a document of the initiating document type enters the system, it triggers the creation of a case. You also can create a case directly without a initiating document. Content Platform Engine implements the case type as a subclass of the Case Folder class (CmAcmCaseFolder). The Case Folder class is a subclass of the Base Case class (CmAcmBaseCase). For more information about the CmAcmCaseFolder class, see IBM Case Manager 5.2 Information Center and click Developing case management applications  Content Platform Engine add-on extensions for Case Manager Builder  IBM Case Manager target object store extensions  Folder subclasses  Case Folder class.

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When you design a solution, Case Manager Builder defines a roster for each solution and an event log for each Case Type in that solution by default. The roster is used by all task workflow definitions for that solution (across all case types). The event log is used for all task workflows that are defined for the case type. You can create an extra event login Process Designer and assign it to any workflow in the case type XPDL. The event log name is _. Ensure uniqueness within each isolated region because the solution prefix provides identification for a solution in an isolated region. This is important because multiple solutions can have the same case type name.

Cases
A case is an instance of a case type. It also is called a case instance. A case is persisted by using a case folder structure. Figure 4-4 shows a case instance. As shown in the diagram, a case or case instance is created from a case type. A case instance comes with a case folder, case properties, tasks that are associated with the case (optional), and case comments (optional).
Task
Comments are case folder annotations

Tasks Case instance comes from a Case Type

Case folder Properties
Containment Annotations

Case comment

History

Other folder
Folder structure was defined in the Case Type Containment

CE Audit Log Case History

Document
Documents comes from a document class

Figure 4-4 Case instance

A case contains a case folder and case history that is associated with it. The case history comes from the object store audit log and workflow system event log, which is not shown in Figure 4-4. The case folder can have subfolders to structure the document content. The comments from case workers throughout the case lifecycle also are associated with the case.

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Users can create cases by completing one of the following tasks: Creating a case folder of subclass CmAcmDeployedCaseType. Case Manager Client uses this method to create a case when users start the add case operation. Creating a document of the initiating document type. This method works only for a case type that has a initiating document property that is defined. In an IBM Case Manager environment, case workers can update the case properties in one of the following ways: Update the case properties from Case Manager Client. Update the case properties from the data that is associated with a task for a case. The task also can include data from a workflow process or an external process, such as IBM WebSphere Process Server. Update the case properties by using custom applications.

Case state
At any moment, a case has one of the following states, which the Content Platform Engine event handler manages: NEW A case is set to this state when Content Platform Engine creates it. INITIALIZING A case is set to this state while Content Platform Engine initializes the case properties. While Case Manager is initializing the case, the case should not be used nor any operation performed on it. WORKING A case is set to this state when there are incomplete tasks or when case initializing is finished and the case is ready for further operations. COMPLETE A case is set to this state when all of its required tasks are completed or manually disabled, or any running task processes are completed or stopped. FAILED This state is not used by the default IBM Case Manager. However, you can use this state in your custom applications to indicate a case that is in an exception or abnormal state.

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Figure 4-5 shows the state diagram for a case.

COMPLETE

NEW

INITIALIZING

WORKING

FAILED

Figure 4-5 Case state transition

Remember: Capitalized letters and underscores are used for the Case and Task states in this book. The actual states that are represented in the Content Platform Engine differ because they use spaces and are not capitalized. For example, the actual state is “Disabled by user” instead of “DISABLED_BY_USER”. The Content Platform Engine Case Folder Update event handler enforces the following case state transition rules (see Figure 4-5): The user cannot reset the state to NEW. The user cannot reset the state to INITIALIZING. If a case is in the WORKING state, the case state can be set to either COMPLETED or FAILED. If a case is in the COMPLETED state, the case state can be set to WORKING. If a case is in the FAILED state, the case state can be set to WORKING or COMPLETE. A case is set to COMPLETED state if all the required tasks are started and any running tasks are completed or stopped. The required tasks here are the tasks that are marked as required at design time. After a task is started, the Case Manager Client also displays the started task as a required task.

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4.1.3 Roles
A role represents a specific business function. For example, in a Complaints Management system, a role might be a Reviewer or Investigator. You assign users or groups to roles. Roles can access only tasks that are assigned to those roles unless the role also can reassign work to others. Roles are defined at the solution level, so roles are shared across case types. During the task design process, steps in a task are associated with roles. At run time, case administrators are responsible for assigning actual users to the roles. Each role has at least one in-basket that is associated with it. The role determines the pages to which the users or groups of the role have access. When you define a case type, you can select different Case page layouts for different roles. Each role has at least one solution page that is associated with it. You can create and assign solution pages to the role that provides case workers with access to the cases and work items in a solution.

4.1.4 Roles in-basket
The roles in-basket is a bucket that contains the work items that the users or groups that belong to the role can access. The role in-basket is created automatically by IBM Case Manager Builder when you create a role. For more information about configuring the details of the role in-basket, such as the columns, sorting, and in-basket filters, see 7.2.3, “Setting up roles” on page 220. A role can access more than one role in-basket, as shown in 12.5.2, “Creating more in-baskets” on page 483. For each role and associated in-basket that is defined in a solution, Case Manager Builder defines a role, associated in-basket, and a work queue in the Process Engine Configuration File. You also can use Process Designer to create a role without creating a work queue. In addition, you can use Process Designer to delete the work queue that is created for a role that is defined in Case Manager Builder. The properties that are specified for a role in-basket become the displayed data fields for the corresponding isolated region work queue.

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Table 4-1 specifies the mapping between roles in a solution and workflow system configuration elements.
Table 4-1 Roles in solution to workflow system element mapping Roles in solution Role name example: Customer Service Representatives Roles Same as role name in solution Queues _ Example: CC_CustomerServiceRepresentatives

The normalized role name is the role name that uses only characters that are valid for a queue name in workflow system.

4.1.5 Personal in-baskets
The personal in-basket displays the workflow work items that are assigned to a particular case worker. A work item is assigned to the personal in-basket as a result of any of the following actions: Case workers move a work item to their own personal in-basket. Case workers reassign an item to a different case worker. An automated processing step assigns the item to a specific workgroup. Each user often has a personal in-basket. However, you can configure a role to not show its personal in-basket to a case worker. Therefore, having an in-basket for a user is optional. IBM Case Manager implements personal in-basket as an in-basket of the “Inbox” queue.

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IBM Case Manager also supports configuring how the personal in-basket is displayed at the level of each role. When you define a role, you can select between the available options, as shown in Figure 4-6.

Figure 4-6 Configuring the personal in-basket for a role

The following settings are available: Personal (Common) All roles that are configured for this setting share a personal in-basket definition. As a result, users see the same columns, sorting, and filtering when they access their personal in-basket, independent of which role they are currently using. Personal (Role) This new setting enables you to have custom in-basket definitions for certain roles. You can use different columns, sort orders, and filters for each role to represent the work that is shown in the personal in-basket for that particular role. Do not show personal in-basket This setting hides the personal in-basket from being shown for a role. It is helpful if the role is not intended to use a personal in-basket at all. When this option (as shown in Figure 4-6) is set, Case Manager Client hides the personal in-basket at run time.

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Remember: Users cannot access personal work that is assigned to them if they are member of a single role that hides the personal in-basket. In this case, you must make sure that you do not directly assign work to users in this role. At the level of the isolated region, all solutions that are inside a Project Area share an Inbox queue for the personal in-basket. IBM Case Manager uses a default workflow data field that is named “SolutionIdentifier” to filter work items into personal in-baskets that are based on the solution name.

4.1.6 Configuring manual work assignment
IBM Case Manager uses in-baskets to present users the work, which is assigned to them personally or to the roles of which they are a member. IBM Case Manager provides various configuration options to provide better control of how users can assign work to themselves or to other case workers.

Moving work to the personal in-basket
When you configure a role, you can define whether role members are allowed to transfer work from the role in-basket to their personal in-basket, as shown in Figure 4-7.

Figure 4-7 Configuring a role to allow moving work to the personal in-basket

When this option is enabled, case workers are allowed to transfer work from the role in-basket to their personal in-basket. They do so by selecting one or more items in the role in-basket and by using the menu option Move Item to personal In-basket. They also can move work back from their personal in-basket to the role in-basket. They can do so by selecting the corresponding entries from their personal in-basket and by using the menu option Return Item. You can use this configuration for roles that might have to spend a longer time to complete their work. You also might need to suspend work and you want to make sure that the person that started to work on an item can continue this work later on.

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You might want to disable this configuration for roles that perform heads-down processing or roles that must complete each work item that they open. If work is not assigned to users in this role in any other way (from users in other roles or by automated rule-based assignments in the process), you can hide the personal in-basket completely for the role. For more information, see 4.1.5, “Personal in-baskets” on page 81. At the technical level, this configuration is stored as a boolean attribute for the role and is called ECM_canMoveWorkToPersonalInBasket.

Assigning work to other users
Another configuration setting defines whether a role can assign work to other users, as shown in Figure 4-8.

Figure 4-8 Configuring a role to reassign work to other users

When this option is enabled, users can select one or more entries from the role in-basket or their personal in-basket and assign them to another user. When work is reassigned from your personal in-basket, you see an extra option in the panel, as shown in Figure 4-9.

Figure 4-9 Optional approval check when work is reassigned

Selecting the option means that you want to approve the work item after the person you assigned it to completes it. As a result, this work item reappears in your in-basket in the same workflow step after the other person completed it. Otherwise, the work item is placed automatically into the next workflow step. At the technical level, this configuration is stored as a boolean attribute for the role and is called ECM_canAssignWork. Important: IBM Case Manager allows a user to assign work to other users only if all of the following conditions are true: The user is member of at least one role with ECM_canAssignWork = true. The work item is not locked by another user. The current workflow step has the reassign option enabled.

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As a default, the reassign option is enabled for each process step you create in IBM Case Manager Builder Step Editor or in the Process Designer. However, you might encounter situations where you want to ensure that the same person performs two sequential workflow steps, or you want to prevent users from reassigning a workflow step for other reasons. In that case, you can disable the reassign option for the step. This setting can be modified in the Step Editor or by opening the General tab for the step in Process Designer.

Viewing all assigned work
IBM Case Manager has an in-basket that allows users to view all work items that are assigned to them throughout the complete solution. This in-basket is helpful in situations where a role member must quickly determine which work is assigned to a particular user. For example, a supervisor who is notified that a team member is sick must find all work that is assigned to that person to decide which work items must be shifted to other case workers. To display this in-basket for a role, enable the setting that is shown in Figure 4-10.

Figure 4-10 Configuring a role to show the in-basket for all assigned work

As a result, a new in-basket that is named “All assigned work” is available in IBM Case Manager Builder, as shown in Figure 4-11.

Figure 4-11 Configuring the in-basket that shows all assigned work

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The default columns that are configured for this in-basket are Step Name, Time Created, Subject, and Assigned To. You can change these columns and add filters in the same way as you do for a regular role in-basket. Generally, do not remove the Assigned To column, which shows the user ID from the Content Platform Engine process services with their short name as configured in the LDAP directory. Figure 4-12 shows how the “All Assigned work in-basket” is presented to the user in the IBM Case Manager Client. The sorting for the work item in this basket is by user ID and then by the column that you select.

Figure 4-12 In-basket showing all work that is assigned for a solution

For this use case, configure the supervisor role to show the “All assigned work” in-basket and to enable this role to reassign work to others. The supervisor role can then easily find all work that is assigned to a particular user and can reassign some or all of it to other case workers. You can configure the access to the “All assigned work” in-basket for several roles in a solution. At the technical level, this configuration is stored as a boolean attribute for the role and is called ECM_viewAssignedWorkInBasket.

Default settings
When you create a role in IBM Case Manager Builder, the configuration parameters are set to the default values that are listed in Table 4-2.
Table 4-2 Default parameters for new roles Role custom attribute ECM_canMoveWorkToPersonalInBasket ECM_canAssignWork ECM_viewAssignedWorkInBasket Default value true true false

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As a result, a role member can move work from a role in-basket to their personal in-basket and assign work to other users. You can change the role custom attributes in IBM Case Manager Builder or by opening the Process Designer for a solution. In the Process Designer, click View  Roles and then click the Custom Attributes tab to display the window that is shown in Figure 4-13.

Figure 4-13 Modifying role custom attributes by using Process Designer

For more information about how to access the Process Designer from a solution in IBM Case Manager Builder, see “Configuration in Process Designer” on page 476. If you changed custom attributes for a role, you must redeploy your solution for the new configuration to be picked up. Tip: For test purposes, you can directly modify the role attributes in the runtime environment by using the Process Configuration Console. However, any changes you apply here are overwritten with the information in the solution package after you redeploy the solution.

Role-based reassignment window
To reassign work, you can select the person that you want to assign the work to, based on their role. It also is possible to select the users by searching for names in the LDAP directory. When you select a role from the list, the users that are assigned to that role are shown in the right side of the window. You can then select the user that you want. The number of roles that are displayed depends on the security settings, which are described in the next section. Users see the role-based assignment window, as shown in Figure 4-14 on page 88.

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Figure 4-14 Role-based user selection for reassigning work

Case workers can still search the Directory Services for the user name by selecting the option Search All Users at the top of the role list, as shown in Figure 4-15.

Figure 4-15 Search for users in the directory service for reassigning work

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Work reassignment and security
In addition to the configuration settings, the security that is configured for the workflow system affects whether users can move or reassign work, and which information is displayed in the role-based assignment dialog. By default, all users are not restricted on the use of rosters, event logs, and queues that are defined in a solution. Therefore, set the security on these objects as required to satisfy your security requirements. When you change security, adhere to the rules that are listed in Table 4-3.
Table 4-3 Access right requirements for reassigning work Action Move work to personal in-basket from role in- basket Access right 1. Query and Process right on the current work queue 2. Query right on Inbox queue 3. ECM_moveToPersonalInbasket = true for role that uses in-basket Reassign work from role in-basket 1. Query and Process right on the current work queue 2. Has ECM_canAssignWork=true Return work from personal in-basket Reassign work from personal in-basket Return work from “All assigned work” in-basket Reassign work from “All assigned work” in-basket Query on destination work queue Has ECM_canAssignWork=true Query on destination work queue 1. Query and Process on Inbox queue 2. Has ECM_canAssignWork=true

The user needs to belong only to one role of the solution to have access to all the roles of the solution and the roles membership. To change the role attributes, such as adding a new member to a role, the user must have the write access to the application. That is, for read-only operations, such as retrieving the list of roles or the members of a role, the user needs to belong only to one role.

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4.1.7 Configuring role pages
Each role must have one solution page. The solution page that is assigned to a role provides the solution access to the case worker in IBM Case Manager Client. These solution pages are shown to the user when a solution is opened in Case Manager Client for the first time. When a role is created, it contains two solution pages Work and Cases, by default. A user also can create custom solution pages and assign them to a role. Figure 4-16 shows the window that is used to assign a solution page to a role in IBM Case Manager Builder.

Figure 4-16 Assigning solution pages to the role

4.1.8 Document types
Document types help you to organize and classify the documents that belong to a case. You can provide more information about the documents by assigning properties to the document type. For example, a document type in the example might be a complaint letter. The document type maps to a document class in the IBM FileNet P8 domain. It maps to an item type in IBM Content Manager, if IBM Content Manager integration is used. Documents that are associated with cases are categorized into types. A document type can trigger a case or task creation. When you design the case types, you can assign a document type to be the initiating document type (also called initiating document type) for a case type. When users create a document of the initiating document type for a case type, IBM Case Manager creates a case instance of that case type. A document type can be the initiating document type for one or more case types.

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When you design task types, you can specify a document type as a filing precondition for a task creation. If a user files a document in a case instance folder, IBM Case Manager creates a task instance. This process occurs if the task has the filing precondition and the document class is the same as the document type that is specified for the precondition. The task with filing precondition can be repeatable. Tip: The display name for a document type is the document type name. The symbolic name for a document type uses the following format: _

4.1.9 Task type
A task type contains tasks. A task has one or more steps that must be completed. For example, a task might be to review a product-related complaint. A task is not completed until all of the steps in the main workflow are completed. A case is not completed until all required tasks are completed or manually disabled and any other running task process are completed or stopped. Consideration: Required tasks are all the tasks that are running (the started tasks) and the tasks that have the required attributes. The following types of tasks are available: Container task Task with reused workflow Case Manager normal task Tasks can be moved to READY state by the following preconditions: Document filing Property update Property condition is met Only tasks with the filing and property update preconditions can be repeated. The filing and property update preconditions can have a property expression as more constraints. For example, you can define a repeatable task with filing (of document class A) and property condition (P1 > 100 and P2 = true). For another example, you can define a repeatable task with property P1 update and property expression condition (P2 = true).

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In the first example, Case Manager promotes the task if a document of type A is filed in the case folder and (P1 >100 and P2=true). In the second example, Case Manager promotes the task if P1 is updated (regardless of the value) and (P2 = true). Document filing and property update preconditions are always evaluated first, then the property expression is evaluated. A task also can be designated as optional or required. A required task must be completed before the case is set to complete. All of the other running tasks must be completed or stopped for the case to complete. Tasks can be included in sets. A set is inclusive or exclusive. Placing a task in an inclusive set means that all of tasks in that set must be completed for the case to complete. Placing a task in an exclusive set means that only one task in the set must be completed.

Hidden task
By using IBM Case Manager, you can define hidden tasks. A hidden task works the same way as a non-hidden task of the same type, but it is not displayed in the Tasks tab in IBM Case Manager Client. Hidden tasks are helpful for background processing tasks, such as initialization or cleaning up that are started based on certain conditions, but do not need to be visible to the case worker. You can configure hidden tasks as being started automatically based on a condition or you start them based on API calls. Although hidden tasks are not shown in the Tasks tab, their status changes and any comments you programmatically add in a hidden task are displayed in the History view.

Container task and subtask
IBM Case Manager release 5.2 also supports the concepts of container task and subtask. A container task is similar to a task in that it can have preconditions. It can start automatically, manually, or discretionary and it can be defined as hidden or repeatable. Also, all required container tasks must be completed or manually disabled for a case to be completed. However, the following important features distinguish a container task: It does not have a workflow that is associated with it It contains one or more subtasks A container task contains one or more subtasks. Subtasks can be container tasks or tasks. Subtasks can be automatic or manual tasks only, not discretionary tasks. Subtasks can have preconditions and can be required and hidden.

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When you organize subtasks in sets, all subtasks in a set must belong to the same container task. Task sets cannot cross container task boundaries. You can move existing top-level tasks into newly created container tasks. Container tasks are useful to group a number of tasks. You also can make them available to the case worker only when certain conditions of phases in the case management process are reached. This way, container tasks help to reduce the number of tasks that are presented in the IBM Case Manager Client. This is especially useful for complex case types. For example, a comprehensive task type can have many single tasks defined. However, depending on the progression of the case, many of these tasks never need to be created because their corresponding preconditions are not met. Therefore, they are of no value for the case worker in that case. Without container tasks, all of these tasks are visible in the Task tab of the Case Information widget. However, most of them are in the waiting state and might never get started. By using high-level container tasks, the worker sees only a few container tasks waiting instead of all of the subtasks that are part of the container tasks. Container tasks also reduce the resources that are spent for a case. Each task instance corresponds to a Task Object in the Content Platform Engine, even if the task is in waiting state. Another advantage of the container task is the performance for a case creation. If you have a case with 200 independent tasks, Case Manager creates 200 task objects. However, if the 200 tasks are grouped into 5 containers and 35 stand-alone tasks, Case Manager creates only 40 task objects. Discretionary container tasks are powerful tools that allow case workers to bring in a predefined set of tasks into a case. This is useful when you cannot describe all of the preconditions that automatically or manually start the tasks. It provides support for highly dynamic and adaptive case management by enabling case workers to judge and decide which tasks must be used on a case-by-case basis. Because container tasks do not have a workflow that is associated with them, you cannot convert an existing task into a container task. In that case, create a container task instead and move your existing task into that container task. A container task is completed only when the following conditions are true: All required subtasks are completed or manually disabled (for manual tasks only). All required tasks that are in the FAILED state also must be stopped. Any working subtasks are complete or stopped/aborted.

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A case is completed when the following situations are true: All required tasks (containers included) are completed, manually disabled, or stopped. All running tasks are completed or stopped. An optional container task in WAITING or READY state is not evaluated for the case completion computation, even if the container task includes a required subtask. This is because the subtasks are not created until the container task is in the WORKING state. If a container task contains a required subtask that is intended to affect the case completion computation (even if the container task is not started), configure the container task as a required container task.

Task Classes
A Task type is a definition of a task class. IBM Case Manager release 5.2 uses one single task type, which is CmAcmCaseTask. Previous IBM Case Manager releases used a separate task type CmAcmCaseTaskWithIntiatingDocument for tasks that are associated with a document filing precondition. This class is deprecated in release 5.1.1. The document that started the task (the initiating document) is stored in the CmAcmTriggerDocument property with the task. For more information about the CmAcmCaseTask class, see the IBM Case Manager 5.2 Information Centerand click Developing case management applications  Content Platform Engine add-on extensions for Case Manager Builder  IBM Case Manager target object store extensions  CmTask subclasses  Case Task class.

Case Task class properties
The Case Task class (CmAcmCaseTask) features the following properties: Task Name If a task is a discretionary task, case workers specify the task name when they create the task. Otherwise, the task has the name of the task class, which is the name that you provided for the task in IBM Case Manager Builder. Disabled State The value of this property indicates whether a task is disabled. If it is disabled, the value also indicates how it was disabled. This integer property has the following choice list that is associated with it (the actual integer value is shown in parenthesis): – ENABLED(0): The task is not disabled. – DISABLED_BY_USER(1): A task was disabled by a case worker.

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– DISABLED_BY_EXCLUSIVE(2): A task is disabled because it belongs to an exclusive group and one of the tasks in the group was promoted to the WORKING state. – DISABLED_ABORTED(3): A task is disabled because its associated workflow was aborted. Required State The value of this property indicates whether the task completion is required to complete a case. A case is completed only when all of the required tasks are completed. This integer property contains a choice list with the following values: – OPTIONAL(0): The task is not required for a case. This is the default value. – REQUIRED_BY_USER(1): This value indicates that the task is marked as required when a manual or discretionary task is started. – REQUIRED_BY_INCLUSIVE(2): This value indicates that the task belongs to an inclusive group and one of the members of the group is in the WORKING state. Launch Mode The value of this property specifies the state of a task when IBM Case Manager creates the task, and whether the task is repeatable. This integer property contains a choice list with the following values: – SYSTEM_MANUAL(0): This value indicates that the task is defined as a manual task. When IBM Case Manager creates a task by using the Content Platform Engine event handler, IBM Case Manager promotes the task from WAITING to READY. This process occurs unless the task has a precondition that prevents it from being promoted. The task remains in the READY state until a case worker starts the task, which then promotes it to the WORKING state. For more information, see “Case object model implementation” on page 102. – SYSTEM_AUTOMATIC(1): This value indicates that this task is an auto-launch task. When IBM Case Manager creates a task by using Content Platform Engine event handler, Case Manager promotes the task from WAITING to READY and then to WORKING state if the task has a precondition that is met. Case Manager then starts its associated workflow. For more information, see 4.2, “Case object model implementation” on page 102. – USER_AUTOMATIC(2): The property indicates that the task is marked as a discretionary task. IBM Case Manager creates a task only when a case worker requests one. After it is created, IBM Case Manager promotes the task from WAITING to WORKING state and starts its associated workflow.

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For more information, see “Case object model implementation” on page 102. – SYSTEM_MANUAL_REPEATABLE(3): This value specifies the task is manual and repeatable. This value has the same attribute as SYSTEM_MANUAL. – SYSTEM_AUTOMATIC_REPEATABLE(4): This value specifies that the task is auto-launch and repeatable. This value has the same attribute as SYSTEM_AUTOMATIC. Remember: For a repeatable task, multiple instances of the task can be created for any case. For a non-repeatable task, only one instance of the task can be created. Only tasks with filing or property update preconditions can be marked as repeatable. Group Mode This property specifies whether a task is stand-alone, inclusive, or exclusive. This property is a choice list property with the following values: – Not Grouped (0): The task does not belong to any group. This value is the default value. – Exclusive (1): The task belongs to an exclusive group. When IBM Case Manager promotes a member of an exclusive group from READY to the WORKING state, the rest of the group is set to DISABLED_BY_EXCLUSIVE. – Inclusive (2): The task belongs to an inclusive group. When IBM Case Manager promotes a member of an inclusive group from READY to the WORKING state, the rest of the group is promoted to REQUIRED_BY_INCLUSIVE. Restriction: A repeatable task cannot belong to a group. A non-repeatable task can belong to no more than one group. Is Container This property specifies whether a task is a container task, and can have the values TRUE or FALSE. Parent Task This object valued property contains the parent container task for Subclass. Filing Document This object valued property contains the document, that if filed, triggers the start of the task, if the task has the document filing precondition.

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Process Instance ID This string valued property contains the ID of the process that was started on the workflow system or IBM Process Server for the task. Last Failure Reason This string property provides information about why the task was set to the FAILED state. It is automatically populated when workflow system moves a task into this state. For example, CmAcmError Launch Failed indicated that IBM Case Manager cannot start the corresponding task workflow. Content Platform Engine can update the task state and this field. Last Restart Date This date and time property is updated by IBM Case Manager when a task is restarted. Restart Count This integer property is used by IBM Case Manager to track the number of restart attempts for a task. You can use this information, for example, to abandon restarting a task after it reaches a number of unsuccessful restarts.

4.1.10 Tasks
Tasks are the instances of task types that are created by IBM Case Manager when a case is created.

Task states
A task can be in one of the following states: WAITING A task is in this state when IBM Case Manager first creates it. READY A task is in this state when the precondition for the task is met. WORKING IBM Case Manager starts a workflow that is associated with a task when it is in this state. A task can enter this state when one of the following events occurs: – A case worker creates a discretionary task. – A case worker starts a manual task that is in the READY state. – The task was in COMPLETED state and a restart was issued successfully through the API.

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– The exception for the task, in the FAILED state, is rectified. The Disabled State property for the task is not set to DISABLED_ABORTED, and a restart was issued successfully through the API. – The task was in FAILED state with Disabled State equal to DISABLED_ABORTED, and a Restart was issued successfully through the API. Case workers cannot disable a task in this state. COMPLETE The task is completed. Any workflow that is associated with the task also is completed. Case workers cannot disable a task in this state. FAILED A task can enter this state under the following conditions: – The associated workflow is in the FAILED or MALFUNCTION state. If the failure condition is rectified, the workflow system sets the state back to WORKING and the work item can continue to be processed. – All the work items for a workflow that is associated with the task are deleted abnormally. Also, in this case the state of the task can be set back to WORKING by issuing a Stop request to gracefully clean up the existing work objects. Then, issue a Restart request. – The task was in WORKING state and a Stop request was issued successfully through the API. This action sets the Disabled State property to DISABLED_ABORTED. Case workers cannot manually disable a task in FAILED state. However, you can provide the capability to stop and restart the task by issuing the corresponding requests through the Case Manager API.

Stopping and Restarting Tasks
With IBM Case Manager 5.2, you can issue Stop and Restart requests for tasks at the API level. You can use a Stop request to gracefully end a task in WORKING state. As a result, any existing workflows for this task are ended. Stopping tasks is useful in the following situations: A task no longer must be completed. A task process failed and cannot be recovered. A case must be ended; for example, when a customer decides not to pursue a complaint. Additionally, a Stop request cleans up a task in the FAILED state.

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In both cases, the task ends in the FAILED state with the Disabled State property set to DISABLED_ABORTED. If wanted, you can restart the task by issuing a Restart request. A Restart request can be used to demote a successfully finished task from COMPLETED back to WORKING state. As a result, a new instance of the corresponding workflow is started. You also can issue a Restart request to demote a task in FAILED state back to WORKING state if one of the following conditions is met: The tasks Disabled State property is equal to DISABLED_ABORTED The tasks Last Failure Reason property has the value “CmAcmError Launch Failed” Figure 4-17 shows the state diagram for a task.

Figure 4-17 Task state transition

IBM Case Manager supports Stop and Restart invocation against a workflow system-based regular task only. It is not supported to stop or restart an IBM BPM-based task and container tasks. Additionally, discretionary tasks can be stopped only. A stop request deletes all of the active work items for a single workflow process instance. This process updates the corresponding task’s state to FAILED and the Disabled State property to DISABLED_ABORTED. Any further workflows that are started by this main workflow are not ended by the request. Furthermore, ending a workflow does not compensate any changes that are applied to external systems, such as values that are changed by using DBExecute or Web Services calls.

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Restarting a task always starts the latest workflow that was deployed for that task. If the solution was redeployed since the start of the task, the workflow that is started at restart can differ from the initial one. The restart does not affect the Date Started property of the task, which remains the time of the original first start. However, it does change the properties Task State, Process Instance ID, Disabled State, Last Date Restarted, Restart Count, and Last Failure Reason. The user who initiates a Stop request must have query rights on the roster and query and process rights on all queues of the solution. For a Restart request to succeed, the requesting user must have create rights for the solution roster. Existing and running task instances of earlier IBM Case Manager versions can be stopped, but they cannot be restarted after the system is upgraded.

Task preconditions
The following preconditions to start a task are possible: Filing To create a task, case workers must file into a case instance a document of a document class that is specified in the filing precondition for the task. IBM Case Manager sets the state of a task that is based on its start mode. You can select which document types are evaluated for a filing precondition. Multi-selection of document types is supported. A filing precondition can be combined with property expression preconditions. Property update Creates a task if one or more case properties are changed. If multiple properties are selected for a property update precondition, the properties are logically combined in an OR condition. For example, Complaint Category OR Complaint Description is changed. More case property expressions can be added to the property update precondition with an AND operator. The case property update precondition can be combined by AND or OR. For example, (Complaint Category OR Complaint Description is changed) AND (Complaint Status = Processing OR Complaint Status = Pending). Property expression When an expression that contains case properties satisfies the condition that is specified in the property precondition, IBM Case Manager sets the state for a task to READY. Then, based on its start mode, the task is promoted to WORKING state. No precondition IBM Case Manager promotes the state of a task to WORKING immediately after creation.

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A task precondition can be a filing or property update precondition, with added property expression for extra constraint.

Task precondition evaluation
When a case is created, IBM Case Manager takes the following actions: Top-level non-discretionary tasks are created and put into their initial state, which is WAITING. Tasks with no precondition or with property preconditions that are met are promoted to READY state. If a task is configured as automatic, it is moved to WORKING and the associated workflow starts. Tasks with a property update or document filing precondition wait until the property condition is met or the document is filed. Consideration: When you create a case and a value is entered for a property, this action does not count as a property update precondition. For repeatable tasks with a property update precondition when the update event triggers, the system checks whether a task of that type is in the WAITING state. If it is not in that state, a task is created. When the container task is moved into the WORKING state, the following processing is started: The corresponding top-level subtasks are created and put in WATING state. Subtasks with no precondition or property preconditions that are met are promoted to READY state. Subtasks that are configured as automatic are promoted to WORKING state and the corresponding workflow starts. Subtasks with property update or document filing conditions wait for the appropriate event to happen before they are evaluated. With IBM Case Manager release 5.2, you can change the preconditions for tasks in a deployed solution by redeploying the solution. This process can change the precondition and the precondition type. For example, you might decide that a verification task be started based on a property update instead of a property condition. You also can change a property-based precondition to a document filing precondition, or vice versa.

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Important: Do not change the task from Automatic or Manual to Discretionary for production systems because starting a discretionary task is different from a system triggered start of a task. Discretionary tasks use a different user interface to start, and often require more information to be passed when they are started. This process can cause incompatibilities with existing task instances. If you change the precondition for task and redeploy the solution on a production system, run the Precondition Checker utility to update running cases. The Precondition Checker checks for any existing tasks that are in a Waiting state. If the tasks satisfy the changed precondition, they are promoted to a READY state. It is mandatory to run the Precondition Checker in the following situations: A property precondition was changed A property update or document filing precondition was changed to a property precondition An existing precondition of any kind was changed to “No precondition” You do not need to run the Precondition Checker if a property update precondition or document filing precondition is used or changed. These precondition types are automatically evaluated the next time that a document is filed or the property is updated. Important: For documents that are already in a case, a new or changed document filing precondition is not evaluated.

4.2 Case object model implementation
This section describes how IBM Case Manager services organize and manage the objects that are addressed in 4.1, “IBM Case Manager object model” on page 71 as data. IBM Case Manager organizes its objects into the following main categories: Design object store (solution packages or artifacts). Target environment (solution instances or deployed solutions). The target environment consists of one target object store and its associated workflow system isolated region.

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4.2.1 Design object store
In IBM Case Manager, there are two main object store add-ons: design object store add-ons and target object store add-ons. A design object store is an object store with IBM Case Manager design object store add-ons that are applied to it. In a development environment, IBM Case Manager uses a design object store to organize and manage the solution packages and artifacts. The solution package contains elements, such as solution definition file (SDF), Process Engine Configuration File, and case type XPDL. IBM Case Manager configuration tool installs IBM Case Manager design object store add-ons while it configures an IBM Case Manager environment. IBM Case Manager configuration tool also creates a folder structure for IBM Case Manager to organize IBM Case Manager solution packages and artifacts. Figure 4-18 shows the root folder structure for IBM Case Manager in a design object store.
Audit configuration stores audit configuration settings for tracking the history of cases. Connection definition include project area definitions Data Sets contain basic Target Object Store configuration and add-ons Contains default set of page templates available in IBM Case Manager This folder contains the solution rule zip file when the solution rules are exported Contains the set of permissions configured for solution objects, users, roles etc. Folder structure for Templates is similar to Solutions folder structure Each solution is tag with the corresponding project area Set of default pages and custom pages Collection of properties view defined under case types in a solution Contains separate rule file for each rule created in a solution. Contains default set of IBM Case Manager widgets

Root Folder

-

IBM Case Manager

+ + + + + + + -

Audit Configurations Connection Definitions Data Sets Page Templates Rule Packages Security Configurations Solution Templates Solutions

-

Solution Definition Configuration

Solution Workflow Collection XPDL

+ + + + +
Widgets

Pages Views Rules

Figure 4-18 Design object store folder structure

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A design or staging object store contains the following artifacts: Solution definition A solution definition is a collection of SDFs, Process Engine Configuration File, XPDL, and pages. A solution package is stored under the Solutions folder in a design or staging object store. For more information about SDF, Process Engine Configuration File, XPDL, pages, views, and rules, see “Solution package” on page 74. Solution template A solution template is a collection of IBM Case Manager artifacts that can be customized and extended to build a complete solution. A solution template is stored in the Solution Templates folder. Connection definition A connection definition specifies the target environment to which an IBM Case Manager solution is deployed. It contains the information about the connection point that is providing access to the associated isolated region and page mapping. IBM Case Manager uses the connection point to discover the target object store and isolated region number. Audit configuration An audit configuration stores the audit configuration settings for tracking the history of cases in IBM Case Manager. An audit configuration is stored in the Audit Configurations folder. Audit configuration settings are stored in an audit manifest file. Security configuration A security configuration contains the security permissions for objects and roles that are stored on an IBM FileNet P8 Platform environment. A security configuration file stores the permissions that are configured for different users, groups, and roles. A security configuration is stored in the Security Configurations folder. Page template A page template is a collection of the default set of pages that are available in IBM Case Manager that also can be used for creating custom pages in IBM Case Manager Builder. A page template is stored in the Page Templates folder. Rule package Rule package is a collection of solution rules. The rule package is created when an administrator exports a solution’s embedded rules, in IBM Case Manager administration client. It contains the solution rule .zip file that is generated on export. A rule package is stored in the Rule Packages folder.

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Widget package The Widget package is a collection of default widgets available in IBM Case Manager. A widget package is stored in the Widgets folder. Remember: A solution definition refers to the solution as defined in the Design or Staging Object Store. A solution package refers to the archive file of the solution that is created when you export the solution.

4.2.2 Target environment
The target environment consists of one target object store and its associated isolated region. A target object store is a Content Platform Engine object store with IBM Case Manager add-ons that are required for a target object store. IBM Case Manager configuration tool installs IBM Case Manager target object store add-ons as part of configuring an IBM Case Manager environment. IBM Case Manager configuration tool also creates a folder structure for IBM Case Manager to organize deployed solutions. Figure 4-19 shows the root folder structure for IBM Case Manager in a target object store.

Root Folder

-

IBM Case Manager

Contains all the solutions deployed in this object store

-

Solution Deployments

-

Case Types

+ Cases are stored in a year, month, day, random number folder structure to avoid large amount of instances in a single folder

Case Structure Cases

Contains for each Case Type, the information needed to create case instances.

-

-

Actual case folder

+

Figure 4-19 Target object store structure

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A target object store contains the following artifacts for a deployed solution: Deployed solution folder A deployed solution folder is a folder structure for a deployed solution in the target object store. Case instances are created under this structure. Case class A case class is a representation for a case type in a solution. Document class A document class is a definition of a document type. Property template A property template is a definition of a property type. Task class A task class is a definition of a task type. Subscription A subscription relates a case or task event condition to corresponding Content Platform Engine event actions. Each target object store is associated with a workflow system isolated region. An isolated region stores process data for the solutions. When users deploy the solutions, IBM Case Manager API transfers the workflow configuration information and workflow collections for the solution to the isolated region. Workflow system metadata includes application space, roster, event logs, queues, roles, in-baskets, and workflow classes. Figure 4-20 on page 107 shows the workflow system isolated region in a target object store.

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Solution Application Space Role In-Basket In-Basket Case Task Workflow

Inbox Queue

Work Queue

Roster Isolated Region

Event Log

Target Object Store
Figure 4-20 Target object store and workflow system isolated region

4.2.3 Project areas for supporting parallel project development
Project areas are used when the development environment for IBM Case Manager must be shared between different solution development teams. Project areas allow solution teams to develop their solutions iteratively without affecting other development teams that share the environment. In particular, developers can isolate the effects of resetting the test environment to a single project area. Project areas are used only in development environments. A single design object store can hold multiple project areas, and each one maps to one development environment. A solution must be unique at the design object store level. That is, two project areas cannot have the same solution. Project areas are used to determine the access to the solutions. Each has its own target object store and workflow system isolated region. Each project area can have multiple solutions and be shared by multiple developers. However, each developer uses only one project area. Figure 4-21 on page 108 shows how project areas in the design object store can be mapped to the target object stores.

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Development Environment (Sandbox) Target Object Store 1
Isolated region

Design Object Store Case Manager Builder Target Object Store 2 Project Area 1 Project Area 2
Isolated region

Project Area n

Target Object Store n
Isolated region

Figure 4-21 Project areas

Project areas are created and managed by IT administrators. An IT administrator runs a task to create and configure a default project area. Other project areas can be set up by using IBM Case Manager administration client. IBM Case Manager administration client handles the privileges that are required for a user to access the design object store of the project area. However, it does not add the privileges for the user in the target object store and isolated region. To avoid reconfiguration later, plan the necessary user access to a project area before you create the target object store and workflow system. Remember these restrictions when you are planning project areas: To perform a test environment reset requires system administrative privileges on the target object store. This action clears out the data in the project area to provide a clean environment for further development. Users who work in project areas must be assigned to the workflow system administration and configuration privilege groups. Remember: For IBM Content Manager integration, each target object store in IBM FileNet P8 maps to an IBM Content Manager Server (Library Service). Therefore, you need multiple IBM Content Manager servers for multiple project areas.

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For more information about setting up Project Areas by using IBM Case Manager administration client, see the IBM Case Manager Information Centerand click Administering your case management system  Setting up project areas.

4.3 IBM Case Manager pages
The IBM Case Manager application consists of a set of pages that are displayed in the Case Manager Client for your solution. IBM Case Manager provides a set of default pages that can be customized. Alternatively, you can create custom pages to use in place of the default pages. Case Manager Client supplies the following default pages: Solution page: The Solution page contains Work page and Cases page layouts. Cases page: The Cases page contains pages for case layouts, such as Add Case and Case Details. Step page: The Step page contains pages for step layouts, such as Add Tasks and Work details. To customize applications, you can use the default pages as templates to create more pages to provide customized views for different user roles and create page layouts for steps and cases. For more information about pages, see Chapter 10, “User interface and widgets” on page 357.

4.3.1 Default pages in a Solution
Default pages in the solution include a Solution page, a Work page, and a Case page.

Solution page
Solution pages provide case workers with access to cases and work items that are in a solution. The solution pages include Work page and the Cases page, as shown in Figure 4-22 on page 110.

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Figure 4-22 Solution pages

Work page
The Work page contains in-basket widgets that display the work items in the in-basket of a role and a personal in-basket. By default, the Work page contains the Add Cases and Manage Roles options. Add Cases allows case workers to create new cases. Manage Roles allows the case administrators to assign role membership. For more information, see 4.1.4, “Roles in-basket” on page 80

Cases page
The Cases page provides case search capability. The page also displays search results in a Case List widget.

4.3.2 Default Cases pages
In the Case pages, the default pages include Add Case, Add Case Form, Case Detail, Case Detail Form, and Split Case.

Add Case page
The Add Case page is a default Case page for manually creating a case instance.

Add Case Form page
The Add Case Form page is similar to the Add Case page. However, it uses a Form widget instead of a Case Data widget for capturing case data when it creates a case. The use of the Add Case Form page as a form can provide extra capabilities, such as dynamic input regions, lookups, or verifications. These capabilities can be used to guide the case worker through the case creation process.

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Case Details page
The Case Details page is a default Case page for displaying case data. This page contains widgets for various case views, such as the Case Data view, Case History view, and Case Task view.

Case Details Form page
The Case Details Form page is similar to the Case Details page, but it uses the Form widget instead of the Case Data widget. This page contains widgets for various case views, such as the Case Data view, Case History view, and Case Task view.

Split Case page
The Split Case page is used to create a case that is based on an existing case. It shows the data and documents for two cases next to each other in preparation of the split. Default Case pages are shown in Figure 4-23.

Figure 4-23 Default Case pages

4.3.3 Default Task pages
The Task pages contain the following default pages: Add Task page, Add Task Form page, Work Details page, Work Details Form page, and Form Attachment Work Details page.

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Add Task page
Case Manager Client displays this page when a case worker adds a discretionary task for a case.

Add Task Form page
The Add Task Form page is similar to the Add Task page, but it uses the Form widget instead of the Case Data widget.

Work Details page
Case Manager Client displays this page when a case worker opens work items from an in-basket.

Work Details Form page
The Work Details Form page is similar to the Work Details page, but it uses the Form widget instead of the Case Data widget.

Form Attachment Work Details page
This page allows the user to enter data to a form, which is then saved as a form document that is attached to the work item.

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Custom Task Details page
Case Manager Client displays this page when a case worker opens a custom task work item. Default task pages are shown in Figure 4-24.

Figure 4-24 Task pages

4.3.4 IBM Case Manager widgets
A page contains a set of widgets. For more information about standard widgets that are available in IBM Case Manager, see 10.4.1, “Standard widgets that are provided by IBM Case Manager” on page 378. For more information about the standard widget, see the IBM Case Manager 5.2 Information Center and click Designing your case management solution and application  Adding and deploying a case management solution  Designing the case management client application  Creating a custom page  Widgets. For more information about enhancing your IBM Case Manager solution by developing and adding your own widgets, see 10.5, “Creating and deploying a custom widget” on page 386.

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4.4 Tasks and associated workflow processes
In IBM Case Manager, each non-container task or a task that does not have subtasks has a workflow that is associated with it. A workflow in an IBM Case Manager environment derives from the CaseWorkObject class that was introduced in Content Platform Engine, Version 5.0. When a non-container task is promoted to WORKING state, IBM Case Manager starts a workflow that is associated with it. A task enters the Working state when one of the following conditions is satisfied: A user creates a discretionary task A user starts a manual task that is in the READY mode A precondition is satisfied for an auto-launch task For more information, see 4.2, “Case object model implementation” on page 102. This section describes the Content Platform Engine enhancements that are used by IBM Case Manager.

4.4.1 Workflow association
Task types are associated with workflow definitions. Workflow definitions can be defined and connected to a task by using one of the following methods: New workflows Workflow definitions can be created by using the Step Editor in IBM Case Manager Builder. They can be enhanced by using the Process Designer. In addition, you can edit workflow definitions directly from the task page. Reuse workflow Existing workflow definitions that were created by using Process Designer can be used when you create a task in IBM Case Manager Builder. Created by WebSphere Integration Designer Existing workflow definitions that were defined in WebSphere Integration Designer that run in WebSphere Process Server can be used when you create a task in IBM Case Manager Builder. Created by WebSphere IBM BPM Process Designer Workflow definitions that were created by using WebSphere IBM BPM Process Designer and available to run in WebSphere Process Server can be used when you create a task in IBM Case Manager Builder.

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For more information about using the workflow in WebSphere Process Server, see Chapter 17, “Integrating with IBM Business Process Manager” of the previous version of this IBM Redbooks publication. The previous version of the book can be found as part of the downloadable material that is associated with this book. For more information, see Appendix A, “Additional material” on page 563 for details. IBM Case Manager uses the CmAcmTaskWorkflowLaunchEventAction action type to wire a task type to a workflow subscription. IBM Case Manager starts the workflow that is associated with a task when such an event action is triggered.

4.4.2 Workflow data fields
Case properties can be accessed directly from a workflow instance. Case properties can be used in expressions of step parameters and route conditions, and to assign system instructions.

Functions
IBM Case Manager Builder adds the following extra data fields that are required by IBM Case Manager components: SolutionIdentifier The SolutionIdentifier is a string-valued field that contains the _ value. Case Manager Client uses the SolutionIdentifier to identify from which solution a work item comes when the personal in-basket is displayed. F_CaseFolder F_CaseFolder identifies the case class and its instance. Content Platform Engine uses the F_CaseFolder data field to retrieve and update the values for the case properties. F_CaseTask F_CaseTask identifies the task class and its instance. Content Platform Engine uses the F_CaseTask data field to update the state for a task. You can access the case property by using the F_CaseFolder.propertySymbolicName syntax. In the example environment, the solution prefix is CC. Therefore, the case property Customer Name can be accessed in a workflow step by using F_CaseFolder.CC_CustomerName. You can directly assign a new value to the case property or use it in a workflow expression the same way as any other workflow data field.

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IBM Case Manager 5.2 provides enhanced support to access the case and task object properties in a workflow by using Business Objects in the expression builder in Process Designer, as shown in Figure 4-25.

Figure 4-25 Accessing case and task properties in the Expression Builder

With this process, you can easily access case or task properties from a workflow definition. It also helps avoid errors because of misspelling. To access the business objects data fields, open the expression builder and select Business Objects from the drop-down menu on the left side. Then, select F_CaseFolder or F_CaseTask as the business object, and double-click one of the associated data fields from the Properties list. For more information about using the Expression Builder, see the IBM FileNet P8 5.2 Information Center and click Integrating workflow into document management  Designing workflows  Define workflow properties  Expression Builder. You can also define step parameters directly from Process Designer and start them with F_CaseFolder..

Saving data in a task step
The information that is displayed in the Properties widget or the Form widget when a task is opened from an in-basket reflects the case data. IBM Case Manager Builder automatically adds these assignments for case properties that are marked as read/write for this workflow step. Process Designer does the same when you define the step parameter for the step.

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For more information about the shadow fields and in-basket synchronization in IBM Case Manager 5.2, see 12.3, “Shadow fields and queue updates” on page 462.

4.4.3 Workflow attachments
From the Step Editor of IBM Case Manager Builder, you define the attachments for a workflow and assign them to a step as the step parameters. If a task has a filing precondition, one of the attachments is selected as the initiating attachment for the workflow. The initiating attachment is added as a read/write parameter for the start step of a workflow. If you do not want to update the attachment, you can add it as read-only parameter. When IBM Case Manager starts the workflow by using the Content Platform Engine event handler, Content Platform Engine assigns the filing document to the attachment parameter for a task.

4.4.4 Starting task workflows
The method IBM Case Manager uses to run a workflow that is associated with a task depends on a launch mode of the task. The following alternatives are available: Auto launch This mode is for a task that starts automatically. The Content Platform Engine event handler is responsible for creating and starting a task when it creates a case instance. Content Platform Engine starts the task if it has no precondition or the precondition is satisfied. If the launch fails, IBM Case Manager sets the task properties State to FAILED and Last Failure Reason to “CmAcmError Launch Failed”. Manual launch This mode is for tasks that start manually. The tasks must be in the READY state before users can start the task. If starting the workflow fails, the same task properties are set as described for Auto launch. User This mode is for a discretionary task. When users click Add Task in IBM Case Manager Client, IBM Case Manager Client presents the users with the Add Task window so that they can edit the workflow data fields. The Add Task window displays only the workflow data fields that are part of the step parameters of the launch step for the corresponding task workflow.

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For a workflow that is associated with a discretionary task, you can edit the launch step from the Step Editor of Case Manager Builder or by using the Process Designer. For more information about launch mode, see 4.1.9, “Task type” on page 91.

4.4.5 Workflow processing and task state
Content Platform Engine updates the state of a task that is associated with a workflow during workflow processing to one of the following task states: FAILED If an exception occurs, the state of the task is set to FAILED. When the error is rectified, the exception is cleared and the state is reset back to WORKING. If a user stops the workflow abnormally, the state is set to FAILED and the task property Disabled State is set to DISABLED_ABORTED. A workflow can be stopped abnormally if the user deletes all of the work items for a workflow. For more information about gracefully stopping and restarting tasks by using the IBM Case Manager API, see “Stopping and Restarting Tasks” on page 98. COMPLETED If a workflow is completed normally, the state of the task is set to COMPLETED. WORKING This is the initial state of a task when a workflow is started. A workflow is in progress when a task is in WORKING state.

4.5 Object model for IBM Content Manager integration
The goal of the integration with IBM Content Manager is to enable IBM Case Manager to store and use documents in IBM Content Manager. This integration allows IBM Content Manager to be the document repository for all the documents that are attached to cases and tasks. You can interact with IBM Content Manager documents that are attached to cases and tasks in the same way as you do with documents that are stored in IBM FileNet P8. You can attach the IBM Content Manager documents, update them, and delete them from the case. In addition, document events can trigger tasks.

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Restriction: A solution can use IBM FileNet P8 or IBM Content Manager as document repository, but not both. The integration depends on the tight linking of documents in IBM Content Manager and folders in IBM Case Manager. This integration is done by using proxy objects in each of the respective repositories. Each document in IBM Content Manager that is attached to a case is represented by a proxy document in IBM FileNet P8. This proxy document is then filed in the case folder. Each case folder in IBM FileNet P8 is represented as a proxy folder in IBM Content Manager. These objects are monitored by the IBM Content Manager adapter and the IBM Case Manager event handlers. When events occur on these objects, they are mapped with the appropriate action. Figure 4-26 shows the object model that is used for the IBM Content Manager integration. CM8 in the figure stands for IBM Content Manager. ICM in the figure stands for IBM Case Manager.

Figure 4-26 Object model for IBM Content Manager integration

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Restriction: With IBM Content Manager integration, the case folder does not support the use of subfolders. All documents are held in one level. Event subscriptions are supported as with the IBM FileNet P8 repository. For example, you can configure a solution so a new case is created when a case worker creates a document in an IBM Content Manager item type. Adapters are used to monitor the events and ensure that the appropriate actions are carried out. The associations of event subscriptions and IBM Content Manager item types are configured when you set up the integration. For each document that is associated with a case in IBM Content Manager, there is a proxy document in IBM Case Manager (IBM FileNet P8), of class CmAcmCM8ProxyDocument. This proxy object holds no user properties. For more information about the object class, see the IBM Case Manager 5.2 Information Center and select Developing case management applications  Content Platform Engine add-on extensions for Case Manager Builder  IBM Case Manager target object store extensions  Custom subclasses and properties of the Document class  Proxy Document Class. For each case folder in IBM Case Manager (IBM FileNet P8), there is a proxy object in IBM Content Manager. This proxy object does not include any user properties. Instead, it contains the following properties that identify the case folder in IBM Case Manager: Case ID Case folder GUID Initiating document ID Object store symbolic name Solution name Case type Case folder name The information about the integration connection with IBM Content Manager is held in a special custom object of the IBM Content Manager Integration Data class, CmAcmCM8IntegrationData. The information is managed by IBM Case Manager administration client. For more information about the class, see the IBM Case Manager Information Center and select Developing case management applications  Content Platform Engine add-on extensions for Case Manager Builder  IBM Case Manager target object store extensions  Custom Object subclass.

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For more information about IBM Content Manager Integration, see Chapter 15, “Integration with IBM Content Manager” of the previous version of this IBM Redbooks publication. The previous version of the book can be found as part of the downloadable material that is associated with this book. For more information, see Appendix A, “Additional material” on page 563.

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Part 2

Part

2

Solution development
This part guides you as you get started with IBM Case Manager solution development. It describes designing a solution, building a simple solution, and deploying a solution. This part includes the following chapters: Chapter 5, “IBM Case Manager tools” on page 125 Chapter 6, “Designing case management solutions” on page 179 Chapter 7, “Building a simple solution: Part 1” on page 211 Chapter 8, “Building a simple solution: Part 2” on page 267 Chapter 9, “Migrating and deploying solutions” on page 313

© Copyright IBM Corp. 2013, 2014. All rights reserved.

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Chapter 5.

IBM Case Manager tools
IBM Case Manager provides a rich set of tools for administration, configuration, and solution development. The tools are designed to help administrator and business analysts to set up IBM Case Manager application and get started with basic configuration and solution development. This chapter describes these tools and includes the following sections: IBM Case Manager tools overview IBM Case Manager configuration tool IBM Case Manager administration client IBM Case Manager Builder Tip: We recommend using this chapter as a reference of how to use the tools. If you want to quickly get started with solution design and building, you can jump to the following chapters: For more information about getting started with designing a Case Manager solution, see Chapter 6, “Designing case management solutions” on page 179 For more information about getting started with building a simple Case Manage solution, see Chapter 7, “Building a simple solution: Part 1” on page 211 and Chapter 8, “Building a simple solution: Part 2” on page 267. For more information about deployment, see Chapter 9, “Migrating and deploying solutions” on page 313.

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5.1 IBM Case Manager tools overview
The IBM Case Manager tools are simple to use and help user to quickly build the case management solutions. The following main tools are available in IBM Case Manager: IBM Case Manager configuration tool You can create an environment profile by using this tool. You can define the connection to the application server, Content Platform Engine repository, and IBM Content Navigator to configure the system. This tool also is used for the initial configuration of the system. You can run the tasks to deploy IBM Case Manager solutions. IBM Case Manager administration client You can import a solution template and create a solution from the template by using IBM Case Manager administration client. The administration client is a tool that is available as a plug-in with IBM Content Navigator. It serves as a user interface for performing administration tasks. The administration client simplifies the administration tasks, such as importing a solution template, creating a solution from a template, copying a solution, configuring a solution, auditing a solution, configuring security, and much more. IBM Case Manager Builder You can create and update the solution in IBM Case Manager Builder. IBM Case Manager Builder is used to create and edit Case Manager solutions. After editing is complete, you can deploy and test the solution in Case Manager Builder. Starting with V5.2, multiple users can create different components, such as customized pages, workflow designing, metadata creation, and view designing simultaneously, in a solution that facilitates faster solution development. In the remaining sections of the chapter, we describe each tool.

5.2 IBM Case Manager configuration tool
The IBM Case Manager configuration tool is focused on the initial configuration of a system. IBM Case Manager configuration tool is used to create the development and production environment profiles to set up the IBM Case Manager application. The tool also provides other functions, such as solution import and export, create solution from template and copy solution, but you are encouraged to use IBM Case Manager administration client for these tasks as described in 5.3, “IBM Case Manager administration client” on page 133.

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5.2.1 Starting the IBM Case Manager configuration tool
To start the IBM Case Manager configuration tool, go to /configure, and run the configmgr command. To run the command-line interface (CLI) for the configuration tool, run the configmgr_cl command from the /configure directory.

5.2.2 Creating a profile
Complete the following steps to create a development environment or production environment profile: 1. Open File Create Profile to create a profile, as shown in Figure 5-1.

Figure 5-1 Creating a profile

2. Enter a profile name to create a profile and click Next. Select the option to create a development or production environment profile, as shown in Figure 5-2 on page 128.

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Figure 5-2 Defining the profile details

3. Specify the Application server, Content Navigator server, and Content Platform Engine server details and click Next. 4. Select the tasks for the profile to configure Case Manager Builder, Case Manager Client, and other optional components. The IBM Case Manager configuration tool tasks configure the environment and deploy the applications. The list of tasks that are available for a profile are shown in Figure 5-3 on page 129.

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Figure 5-3 Selecting tasks for the profile

For more information about configuring the environment, see the IBM Case Manager Information Center and select Installing and configuring IBM Case Manager  Installing and configuring on a stand-alone server  Configuring IBM Case Manager.

5.2.3 Running the profile tasks
After the development profile is created, you can run the tasks that were selected while you were creating the environment profile. The profile is opened in the IBM Case Manager configuration tool to run the tasks, as shown in the Figure 5-4 on page 130.

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Figure 5-4 Running the tasks

The following tasks are available in a profile: Update the Content Platform Engine Client Connector Files This task replaces the Content Platform Engine Client files. The task is not needed if Content Platform Engine Client installer is running. After you run this task, the configuration tool must be restarted. Configure the Login Modules This task configures the login modules that are used by IBM Case Manager to connect to the Content Platform Engine server. Configuring Login Modules is not necessary if you are deploying to the same WebSphere profile as Content Platform Engine server. Configure LDAP This task configures the directory service authentication settings for IBM Case Manager. This is a required task and the user can test the LDAP server connection by using the Test LDAP Connection option. Import the LTPA Key This task configures the Lightweight Third-Party Authentication (LTPA) for the IBM Case Manager applications. IBM Case Manager uses WebSphere Application Server LTPA tokens to provide single sign-on support. Configure the Case Management Object Stores This task installs the case management design and target object store addons and updates code modules, event handlers, subscriptions, page templates, case operations code module, and case operations configuration file.

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Define the Default Project Area This task defines the default project area and creates the connection definition that is associated with that project area. Create Case Manager Applications This task creates the Case Manager API WAR file, Case Manager Help System WAR file, Case Manager Builder EAR file, and Case Forms WAR file. This task also configures WorkplaceXT for a development profile. For more information about configuring the Workplace XT, see the IBM Case Manager Information Center and select Installing and configuring IBM Case Manager  Installing and configuring in a cluster deployment or network deployment  Configuring IBM Case Manager  Configuring the development environment for cluster or network deployment  Running the development environment configuration tasks  Configuring Workplace XT for a development environment. Deploy the Case Manager API This required task deploys the IBM Case Manager application to the application server. You can update different parameters and save the changes. Run the task to apply the settings. Register the IBM Case Manager Services plug-in This task registers the IBM Case Manager services plug-in with IBM Content Navigator. The Case Manager model API is in this plug-in, which is used by Case Manager Client and can be used by any user-created Content Navigator plug-ins. Deploy Workplace XT This task deploys the Workplace XT EAR to the IBM Case Manager server. Workplace XT EAR must be packaged before this task is run, either manually or by using the Create Case Manager Applications task. If Workplace XT is installed on a different server or is in a different profile, skip this task and manually deploy the application. Deploy Case Manager Builder This task deploys the Case Manager Builder EAR to the application server. You must run Create Case Manager Applications task first to make the Case Manager Builder WAR file. You also must run Deploy Case Manager API task for Case Manager Builder to work.

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Deploy the Case Manager Help System This task deploys the Case Manager help system WAR file to the application server. Deploying the help system WAR file makes the IBM Case Manager helps system available for you in Case Manager Builder and Case Manager Client. You must run Create the Case Manager Applications task to create the help system WAR file. Deploy and Register Widgets Package This task registers the widgets package to the application server. The default widgets package for Case Manager Client is selected by default; however, this task also can be used for registering custom widgets packages. If there is an EAR inside the widgets package, this task deploys the EAR. Deploy the Forms Application This task is used to deploy the case Forms like eForms and IBM Forms. You must run Create Case Manager Applications task first to create the Case Forms WAR file. If you are configuring IBM Forms, you must restart the application server before you can use IBM Forms with Case Manager. Register the IBM Case Manager administration client plug-in This task registers the IBM Case Manager administration client plug-in. This task is required for the IBM Case Manager administration client feature to be available for use by a desktop on IBM Content Navigator. Register Project Area This task registers the project area with the IBM Content Navigator server. You must run Configure the Case Management Object Stores, Deploy and Register Widgets Package, and Register the IBM Case Manager administration client plug-in tasks before this task is run. This task creates the default IBM Case Manager desktop and the IBM Case Manager administration client desktop. Configure Business Rules (Optional) This task enables and configures business rules for IBM Case Manager. You run the Register Project Area task before this task is run. Rules are deployed to the specified rules repository directory. Register the External Data Service This task registers an external data service for use with a solution, saving the association in the connection definition of the project area for the solution. This task is optional and is disabled by default. You must restart the application server after running all of the tasks.

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5.3 IBM Case Manager administration client
IBM Case Manager administration client is a web-based tool that can be used for performing administrative tasks in IBM Case Manager. It is available as plug-in on IBM Content Navigator desktop that was created by default during the IBM Case Manager configuration process. If the IBM Case Manager administration client is not available by default, you can open the default desktop for Case Manager Client and add the IBM Case Manager administration client feature under appearance tab. This enables IBM Case Manager administration client plug-in on the Case Manager Client desktop. This section describes the following features that are provided by IBM Case Manager administration client: Copying a solution Creating solution templates Using solution templates Exporting and importing a solution Exporting business rules Configure locks Enabling case history store Widget packages Configuring an audit Configuring security Manage project areas Extra options for an administrator in administration client

5.3.1 Copying a solution
In a development environment, a solution copy is useful. As a solution is developed, you might want to test a few ideas before you incorporate the changes into the primary solution. You can use a copy to create a sandbox solution for isolated development and testing without affecting the primary solution. When you are satisfied with changes, you can add the changes to the primary solution. There are two methods to copy a solution: By using Case Manager Builder and by using IBM Case Manager administration client. More options are available when you use the IBM Case Manager administration client to perform a solution copy.

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Copying a solution by using administration client
To use administration client to copy a solution, complete the following steps. (these steps often are done by an IBM Case Manager administrator): 1. Log in to the following IBM Case Manager administration client: http://:/navigator/?desktop=icmadmin 2. Open the design object store in the left panel. Right-click the solution name folder to copy the solution, as shown in Figure 5-5.

Figure 5-5 Copy a Solution option in administration client

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3. Alternatively, view all the solutions in the right panel and then right-click the solution name to copy the solution, as shown in Figure 5-6.

Figure 5-6 Copying a solution in administration client

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4. Specify a name and prefix for the new solution and leave the other options as default. Click Next, as shown in Figure 5-7.

Figure 5-7 Copy a Solution: Specifying new solution details.

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5. Review the details and click Finish, as shown in Figure 5-8.

Figure 5-8 Copy a Solution: Reviewing new solution details

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If successful, the solution is available in Case Manager Builder for you to edit, as shown in Figure 5-9.

Figure 5-9 Copied solution available in Case Manager Builder

Copying a solution by using Case Manager Builder
An alternative to using administration client to copy a solution is to use the Case Manager Builder. Complete the following steps to copy a solution in Case Manager Builder: 1. Log in to the Case Manager Builder at: http://:/CaseBuilder 2. Select the solution that you want to copy to activate solution actions, as seen in Figure 5-10 on page 139.

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Figure 5-10 Copy solution in Case Manager Builder

3. Enter the name and solution prefix, as shown in Figure 5-11.

Figure 5-11 Copy a solution window

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In this example, the name is Customer Complaints Duplicate, and the solution prefix is CCD. 4. Verify that Validate this solution before copying is selected to ensure that the new solution begins in a validated state and then click OK. Restriction: You cannot copy a solution that has files that are checked out in the solution package if you select the Validate this solution before copying option.

Requirement: The solution prefix must be unique. A unique prefix ensures that the artifacts that are created in each solution are created as unique objects when they are deployed. Although this is not enforced when you create or copy solutions, you receive an error when you deploy a solution with a duplicate prefix. The solution is then copied and is available for editing within Case Manager Builder, as shown in Figure 5-12.

Figure 5-12 Copied solution

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5.3.2 Creating solution templates
A solution template is a collection of assets that are created by Case Manager Builder that can be used as the basis of a new solution. These assets include the properties, document types, roles, pages, tasks, and workflows for a solution. This section describes how to convert a solution into a solution template. Creating a solution template is useful for standardizing default assets within a solution, or for creating an industry template that is to be deployed to external entities. To promote a solution to a solution template, complete the following steps: 1. Log in to IBM Case Manager administration client at: http://:/navigator/?desktop=icmadmin 2. Right-click the solution and select the Convert to Solution Template option, as shown in Figure 5-13.

Figure 5-13 Selecting Convert to Solution Template

3. Review the solution details that are provided in the first window of the wizard, click Finish, as shown in Figure 5-14 on page 142.

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Figure 5-14 Convert a Solution to a Template: Review the solution properties

Test your solution template after it is created and address any issues before you pass it to others to use. If the template creates identifiers, perform a run through of a new solution that is based on the template to verify that nothing was broken. The following extra options are available when you create a solution template: Create unique identifiers when a solution is created from the template. If your solution does not have any dependencies on any identifiers, select this option. An example of the use of this option is if a solution was developed entirely in Case Manager Builder or Process Designer. With such a solution, no external assets rely on any symbolic names. This is the default option. Use existing unique identifiers when a solution is created from the template. If your solution has dependencies on any identifiers and requires that those identifiers do not change names, select this option. An example for the use of this option is if your solution contains extra assets that rely on objects in the solution. These extra assets can be an IBM Form, stored search, or custom application that interfaces with solution data. A company-wide form might reference CC_Address from the sample solution. If so, a basic template provides the Address property to all new solutions so that the form does not require modification. The form continues to map to CC_Address and all new solutions that are based on the template contain CC_Address for the form.

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5.3.3 Using solution templates
To create a solution from a solution template, you can use IBM Case Manager administration client and Case Manager Builder.

Using a template in IBM Case Manager administration client
To create a solution by using a solution template in IBM Case Manager administration client, complete the following steps: 1. Log in to IBM Case Manager administration client at: http://:/navigator/?desktop=icmadmin 2. Right-click the template name in the Solution Templates folder and select Create Solution, as shown in Figure 5-15.

Figure 5-15 Selecting Create Solution

3. Specify a name and prefix for the new solution and the project area. Leave the other options as default and click Finish. For the example, enter Customer Complaints Newer1 as the name of the new solution and CCN1 as the prefix, as shown in Figure 5-16 on page 144. If you have more than one project area, you can select another project area. For the example, use the default project area of dev_env_connection_definition.

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Figure 5-16 Create a Solution from a Template: Specifying new solution details

Upon completion, your are informed whether the action is successful. If so, you can see your new solution in Case Manager Builder.

Using a template in Case Manager Builder
To create a solution by using a solution template in Case Manager Builder, complete the following steps: 1. Log in to Case Manager Builder at: http://:/CaseBuilder

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2. Select the template that you want from the list and click Add Solution, as shown in Figure 5-17.

Figure 5-17 Selecting a template to create a solution in Case Manager Builder

3. Complete the solution name and prefix for the new solution and click OK. In the example, Customer Complaints Newer is the solution name and CCN is the solution prefix, as shown in Figure 5-18.

Figure 5-18 Specifying new solution details

4. The solution is created and you are automatically taken to the edit window of the new solution.

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5.3.4 Exporting and importing a solution
A solution also can be exported and imported in IBM Case Manager administration client. Users can export the solution and move it to the different environments. Complete the following steps to export a solution: 1. Right-click a solution in IBM Case Manager administration client and select Export  Solution, as shown in Figure 5-19.

Figure 5-19 Export a solution

2. In the wizard, enter the solution package file name and click Finish. For example, enter Customer_Complaints_solution.zip as the name of the solution package, as shown in Figure 5-20 on page 147.

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Figure 5-20 Export solution: Specify solution package name

By using the IBM Case Manager administration tool, you can import a solution package. To import a solution package, complete the following steps: 1. Click Import and select the Import Solution option to import a solution in IBM Case Manager administration client, as shown in Figure 5-21.

Figure 5-21 Importing a solution

2. In the wizard, select the solution package .zip file name by using the Browse option and click Next, as shown in Figure 5-22 on page 148.

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Figure 5-22 Import a solution: Selecting a solution package

3. Review the solution package details before you import the package and then click Next, as shown in Figure 5-23.

Figure 5-23 Import a solution: Reviewing solution package details

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4. In this step, users can map IBM Case Manager users and groups for the solution. Click Finish, as shown in Figure 5-24.

Figure 5-24 Import a solution: Mapping users and groups

5. The solution is successfully imported into the environment and a success message is shown, as shown in Figure 5-25.

Figure 5-25 Import a solution: Solution successfully imported

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Remember: Administration-related wizards from past releases are still available in the IBM Case Manager configuration tool, but the focus of administration is now available in the IBM Case Manager administration client. Users are encouraged to use the administration client instead of the configuration tool.

5.3.5 Exporting business rules
In IBM Case Manager 5.2, users can export the business rules that were created in a solution by using IBM Case Manager administration client. Export creates a download package for the solution's rule configuration. To export a solution rule configuration, complete the following steps: 1. Right-click a solution in IBM Case Manager administration client and select Export  Business Rules, as shown in Figure 5-26.

Figure 5-26 Exporting business rules of a solution

2. In the wizard, enter the rule package name and click Finish. For the example, enter Customer_Complaints_rules.zip as the name of the solution rules package, as shown in Figure 5-27 on page 151.

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Figure 5-27 Export business rules: Specifying rule package details

On successful completion, the rules package is saved on the local file system. For more information about creating rules and configuration, see Chapter 13, “Business rules” on page 507.

5.3.6 Configure locks
IBM Case Manager administrator can configure the locks setting for the multi-user editing environment by using IBM Case Manager administration client. Administrator can unlock solution artifacts that are preventing the development or deployment of a solution. Multiple locks can be released in one request. Complete the following steps to unlock a solution: 1. Open the solutions in IBM Case Manager administration client. Right-click the solution name and select Configure Locks, as shown in Figure 5-28 on page 152.

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Figure 5-28 Selecting Configure Locks

2. The wizard shows the locked solution artifacts. Select a solution artifact and click Unlock, as shown in Figure 5-29. In this example, Customer Information view is locked by the user p8admin.

Figure 5-29 Configure Locks: Selecting solution artifact to unlock

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5.3.7 Enabling case history store
In IBM Case Manager administration client, administrators can enable a case history store for a target object store. To use the Timeline Visualizer widget to view custom properties in the case history over time, users must enable case history store. To enable case history store, select the Enable case history store option in the target object store, as shown in Figure 5-30.

Figure 5-30 Enabling case history store

5.3.8 Widget packages
Custom widget packages can be registered by using IBM Case Manager administration client. By default, IBM Case Manager Widget package is registered. You can register more widget packages in IBM Case Manager administration client. In the design object store, select Widget Packages  Register Custom Widgets, as shown in Figure 5-31 on page 154.

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Figure 5-31 Widget packages

Registering custom widgets
IBM Case Manager administration client supports registering and removing of custom widget packages. You can upload custom widget packages to IBM Case Manager. Register the widgets to make them available for design and run time. If a custom widgets package contains an EAR file, the EAR must be manually deployed. Tip: The custom widgets package also can be registered using the IBM Case Manager configuration tool, which deploys the EAR file.

5.3.9 Configuring an audit
Users can create and modify an audit configuration for a solution by using IBM Case Manager administration client. To apply an audit configuration to a solution, complete the following steps: 1. Log in to IBM Case Manager administration client at: http://:/navigator/?desktop=icmadmin 2. Right-click the solution and select Configure Auditing, as shown in Figure 5-32 on page 155.

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Figure 5-32 Selecting Configure Auditing

3. In the wizard, select Create an audit configuration and click Next, as shown in Figure 5-33.

Figure 5-33 Configure auditing: Creating an audit configuration

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4. Enter the audit manifest name and click Next. In this example, the audit manifest name is Audit_configuration, as shown in Figure 5-34.

Figure 5-34 Configure auditing: Specifying audit manifest details

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5. Select the properties to audit. Click Add to select the solution properties for auditing, as shown in Figure 5-35.

Figure 5-35 Configure auditing: Select the properties to audit

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6. Review the selected properties and click Save. In this example, select the Customer Name and Complaint Category properties and click Next, as shown in the Figure 5-36.

Figure 5-36 Configure auditing: Selected properties to audit

7. Select Apply audit configuration and then click Apply to apply the audit configuration to the solution immediately, as shown in Figure 5-37.

Figure 5-37 Configuring auditing: Applying the audit configuration

5.3.10 Configuring security
Security configuration for a solution is defined in IBM Case Manager administration client. Administrators can perform the following steps to define the security for a solution: 1. Open the solution in IBM Case Manager administration client and right-click the solution to configure the security. Click Configure Security, as shown in Figure 5-38 on page 159.

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Figure 5-38 Solution Security Configuration

2. Select Create a security configuration to assign the permissions to different objects and roles of a solution and click Next, as shown in Figure 5-39.

Figure 5-39 Security Configuration: Create a security configuration

3. Enter a security manifest name and click Next. In this example, enter security_configuration as the security manifest name, as shown in Figure 5-40 on page 160.

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Figure 5-40 Security Configuration: Specifying the security configuration details

4. The wizard shows all of the roles of a solution and different permission options for each role. Select the permissions for different roles and click Next, as shown in Figure 5-41. In this example, select Create Case permission for the role Contact Center to allow the role to create cases and the View Case permission for the role Manager to allow the role to view case details in IBM Case Manager.

Figure 5-41 Security Configuration: Specifying role permissions

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5. Select the user and specify privileges for the user to define them as an administrator and click Next. In this example, select user P8Admin and assign the administrator privileges, as shown in Figure 5-42.

Figure 5-42 Security Configuration: Assigning user privileges

6. Select the user and associate with different roles, as shown in Figure 5-43 on page 162. In this example, user P8Admin is associated with role Specialist.

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Figure 5-43 Security Configuration: Associate users with roles

7. Select the option to apply the security configuration. Click Save to save the configuration and then click Apply to apply the security configuration to the deployed solution immediately, as shown in Figure 5-44.

Figure 5-44 Security Configuration: Applying the security configuration to the solution

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5.3.11 Manage project areas
Project areas are used only in development environments. A single design object store can hold multiple project areas and each object store maps to one development environment. Project areas are created and managed by IT administrators. An IT administrator often creates and configures a project area by using IBM Case Manager administration client. In IBM Case Manager administration client, the design object store contains a default folder to define project areas. An administrator can right-click the project area folder to define a new project area. To view the project area details, right-click an existing project area and select View and Edit, as shown in Figure 5-45.

Figure 5-45 Project Areas: View and Edit option

In this example, project area dev_env_connection_definition is defined as the default project area, as shown in Figure 5-46 on page 164.

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Figure 5-46 Viewing project area details

After the project area is created, the administrator can register the project area, as shown in Figure 5-47.

Figure 5-47 Registering the project area

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5.3.12 Extra options for an administrator in administration client
An IBM Case Manager administrator has an extra set of options that are not available through Case Manager Builder. The first set of options concern properties. The example solution has a property that is called Address that is used in the following examples: Create properties when the new solution is deployed. Properties are created for the new solution by using the prefix that is defined for it. In the original example solution, the symbolic name of this property is CC_Address. In the new solution, with this option selected, the CC_Address property is copied into the new solution with the symbolic name of CCID_Address. The new property is controlled by the new solution, which can modify the property as needed. Use existing properties when the new solution is deployed. Properties that are defined in the original solution continue to be used in the new solution. Properties that are defined in the original solution do not have their prefix changed to match the prefix that is defined for the new solution. In the original solution, the symbolic name of this property is CC_Address. With this option selected, the property maintains the symbolic name CC_Address. The property is not controlled by the new solution; only the original solution can modify the property. Remember: If you use existing properties, you must track solution migration and deployments. A copied solution that reuses properties must be deployed after the original solution. The second set of options concern document types. The example solution has a document type that is called Customer Correspondence that is used in the following examples: Use new document types when the new solution is deployed. Document types that are defined in the original solution have their prefix changed to match the prefix that is defined for the new solution. In the original solution, the symbolic name of this document type is CC_CustomerCorrespondence. With this option selected, the document type takes on the symbolic name CCID_CustomerCorrespondence. The document type is then controlled by the new solution, which can modify the document type as needed.

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Use existing document types when the new solution is deployed. Document types that are defined in the original solution do not have their prefix changed to match the prefix that is defined for the new solution. In the original solution, the symbolic name of this document type is CC_CustomerCorrespondence. With this option selected, the document type maintains the symbolic name CC_CustomerCorrespondence. The document type is not controlled by the new solution. Only the original solution can modify the document type. Remember: If you use existing document types, you must track solution migration and deployments. A copied solution that reuses document types must be deployed after the original solution. The last option concerns assets in a solution folder. Copy other document or folder assets. This option is useful if you decide to store any solution assets that are not defined in Case Manager Builder or Process Designer in the solution folder. This option duplicates those objects from the original solution folder to the new solution folder. The restriction is that only base folder and documents are copied.

5.4 IBM Case Manager Builder
IBM Case Manager Builder is a web application tool that is designed to create and deploy solutions. For more information about how to create a solution in IBM Case Manager Builder, see the following resources: Chapter 6, “Designing case management solutions” on page 179 Chapter 8, “Building a simple solution: Part 2” on page 267 Starting from IBM Case Manager V5.2, Case Manager Builder supports multiple users editing a solution. Multiple developers can build different parts of a solution at the same time. Designing in multiple user mode speeds up the solution design process and enables solution developers to make effective use of their development team.

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5.4.1 Multiple user solution development in Case Manager Builder
Case Manager Builder supports multiple users editing a solution at the same time. This allows multiple users to design different parts of the solution concurrently. When a user edits a solution element, such as a rule, that element is automatically locked with the user’s ID. The lock protects the element from being modified by a second user until all of the first user’s changes are complete. When a user completes their modifications, they must commit their changes to release the locks. The commit operation makes the changes part of the released solution definition. The save and close operation allows the user to save their work and exit their editing session without losing their work. Changes are not included in the released solution and the locks remain in place until the Commit operation occurs (see Figure 5-48). This allows for deployment of the solution while portions of the solution are edited.

Figure 5-48 Commit the changes to a solution

Administrators can remove locks by using the Case Administration tool (http://:/navigator/?desktop=icmadmin). Removing the locks releases the solution element for editing and discards the associated updates. The commit operation promotes the edits to the solution, which results in new versions of the solution objects and releases the locks. After the commit is complete, the changed solution elements are included in the next deployment.

Note: Not only is it a good general security practice, developers should always use different user accounts. If they share an account, unexpected results can occur if the users do not coordinate resulting in changes being committed before they are completed.

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Solution assets that can be edited in parallel are in the following categories: A user can create and modify pages in the page designer. A user can create and modify rules in rule designer. A user can create and modify views in view designer. A user can create and modify task workflows in step designer. A user can create and modify the following solution definition assets: – – – – Properties and choice lists Document types Case types including case folders, case search, and case summary view Solution description and solution icon

A user can create and modify the following workflow system configuration assets: – Roles – In-baskets

5.4.2 Solution assets
Solution assets are associated with specific configuration files. An IBM Case Manager solution contains the following assets: Solution Definition File (SDF): Contains solution objects, such as properties, choice lists, document types, case types, and tasks. Process Engine Configuration File: Contains workflow system objects, such as roles, in-baskets, and rosters. Solution Workflow Collection (Global) XPDL: Contains the reusable Content Platform Engine workflow definitions. Existing Content Platform Engine workflows can be selectively imported into the collection. Case type XPDLs: Case type XPDL contains workflow definition for each case type. Pages folder contains one file for each page that is defined in a solution. Rules folder contains one file for each rule that is defined in a case type. Views folder contains one file for each view definition that is created in a case type. In addition to these assets, the following assets are added to support multiple user editing: Solution locks object: Contains the lock information for a solution.

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Case type XPDL draft object: Each case type XPDL has a draft object to maintain its draft content. This object is name as _Draft. Global XPDL draft object: Global XPDL has a separate draft object to maintain its draft content. It is named as Solution Workflow Collection_Draft. All the assets of a solution are shown in Figure 5-49.

Figure 5-49 Solution assets

5.4.3 Solution lock and draft object
The solution lock and draft object are introduced in IBM Case Manager 5.2 to support multiple user editing in the Case Manager Builder. The solution lock object is created when a user is editing a solution artifact. The solution draft object stores the assets information before the solution is committed.

Solution locks
When a user edits, adds, or deletes an asset in the Case Manager Builder, the respective asset file is locked for the user and a solution lock object is created for the solution. A solution lock object stores the lock information of all the assets in a solution. Solution locks object files are created under the solution folder and is a subclass of the Solution Lock Control custom object. After an asset is locked by the user, other users who edit the solution can see the associated assets in read-only mode. The solution locks are stored in an XML format inside solution locks object. Each lock contains the following attributes: type: Represents the object type, such as SDF, page, rule, view, and task. resource: Contains the name of the asset that is locked. displayName: Contains the display name of the asset.

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lockedby: Contains the name of the user who locked the asset. caseType: Includes the case type name to which the asset belongs. It is applicable only for view, rule, and task object. The structure of a solution lock object is shown in Example 5-1.
Example 5-1 Solution lock object structure

0 sdf Solution Definition File dave 2013-08-21T22:59:58.429Z 1 peconfig PE Configuration File dave 2013-08-21T22:59:58.548Z 2 CmAcmCASE_PAGE CmAcmCASE_PAGE Case Details Form paula 2013-08-22T12:17:20.959Z 5 SRIXX_Task11 Task11 SRIXX_CaseType11 paula 2013-08-22T12:17:36.699Z

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Locking the SDF
The SDF is locked when any of the solution objects that are stored in it are locked, such as properties, choice lists, document types, case types, and tasks. When a user adds, modifies, or deletes any of the SDF object, the SDF is locked for that user. For example, when a user is editing properties in Case Manager Builder, SDF is locked and other users can see the lock icon for all of the SDF objects, as shown in Figure 5-50.

Figure 5-50 Properties that are locked by another user

Locking the Process Engine Configuration File
The Process Engine Configuration File contains details about roles and in-baskets. When a user modifies any artifact that is stored in the Process Engine Configuration File, the file is locked for that user and other users can view only the configuration assets, such as roles and in-baskets.

Locking pages, views, and rules
Pages, views, and rules contain separate configuration files for each object. When a user edits any of these objects, the respective assets are locked. Other users can view only the basic asset information, such as name and description. In the example that is shown in Figure 5-51 on page 172, a page Work is locked by a user and it appears as locked to other users.

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Figure 5-51 Page that is locked by another user

Page Work is shown to users in read-only mode. Users can view only the details of the page, such as name and description, as shown Figure 5-52.

Figure 5-52 Read-only view of page that is locked by another user

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An error message is shown to the user when the user clicks the page name to edit the page content, which is locked by another user, as shown in Figure 5-53.

Figure 5-53 Error message that is shown on edit of a locked artifact

Locking tasks
Tasks are locked when the task workflow that is opened for editing is a step designer or process designer. Other users can still open the locked task to view the workflow in a read-only mode. A lock icon is shown to indicate that a task is locked. Different users can simultaneously lock and edit different task workflows under a case type.

Show locked objects
In IBM Case Manager Builder, users can click the Show Locked Items link from anywhere inside the solution. Clicking this link shows the assets that are locked by the logged in user and the assets that are locked by other users who are editing the solution, as shown in Figure 5-54.

Figure 5-54 Show locked items link in Case Manager Builder

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The locked item information window provides the details of the locked solution artifacts, as shown in Figure 5-55.

Figure 5-55 Details of locked items

Draft objects
When user clicks the Save button in Case Manager Builder, it saves the changed assets in their respective draft objects. The following draft objects are available for different assets: The draft object for SDF, PE configuration, page, rule, and view asset is their respective CPE reservation object. For each case type XPDL, there is a separate custom draft object. If the data remains in the draft, it cannot be viewed by other users. Case type draft object stores the draft workflows of the tasks in a case type. The draft object for Global XPDL is Solution Workflow Collection_Draft, which stores the draft content of the reused business process workflows.

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5.4.4 Case Manager Builder save options
To support multiple users editing in Case Manager Builder, the save options were updated in Case Manager 5.2. Users can see the following Save, Save and Close, and Close buttons in Case Manager Builder to save a solution: Save: This option saves the locked solution assets to draft or reservation object for the logged in user. The user remains inside the solution and can continue editing the solution. Save and Close: This option works similar to save model. The logged in user moves out of the solution and returns to manage solutions page in Case Manager Builder. Close: By using this option, the user can exit the solution and keep the items in draft or reservation object. The user is prompted to save any unsaved changes before returning to the manage solutions page in Case Manager Builder.

5.4.5 Committing and deploying a solution
When the work to edit a solution is finished, users can commit the solution changes and release the lock on all the modified assets. After the changes are committed, the solution is ready for deployment and the user can deploy the solution assets.

Committing a solution
When a user commits a solution, all locks that are owned by the user are released. Assets that are locked by other users are not updated and remain locked. When a user commits the changes, the draft changes are committed as major versions into the respective configuration files. After they are committed, the solution package files are available for deployment and for other users to edit or view. A solution change can be committed in IBM Case Manager Builder from the manage solutions page. A commit link is provided for each solution to commit the changes, as shown in Figure 5-56 on page 176.

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Figure 5-56 Commit link for a solution

On commit, a confirmation window is shown to the user to provide the details of the items that are locked, as shown in Figure 5-57.

Figure 5-57 Confirmation window that is shown to the user upon commit

Users can review the lock details and click Commit My Changes to commit the solution changes. Note: IBM Case Manager administration client can be used to unlock solution assets that are owned by other users. For more information, see 5.3.6, “Configure locks” on page 151.

Deploying a solution
If there are any uncommitted changes in the solution, a deployment confirmation window is shown to the user when a user deploys a solution. The deployment confirmation window shows the assets that are locked by the current user and other users. Users can commit the changes before the deployment is performed. Figure 5-58 on page 177 shows the deployment confirmation window.

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Figure 5-58 Confirmation window that is shown to the user upon deployment

When a user deploys the solution, only the committed assets are deployed. The assets that are locked by the other users are in draft mode and are not deployed. For more information about multiple users editing the solution, see IBM Case Manager Information Center and select Designing your case management solution and application  Adding and deploying a case management solution  Multiple user editing of solutions.

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Chapter 6.

Designing case management solutions
This chapter describes how to design solutions with IBM Case Manager. It covers the various approaches, alternatives that are available, and key considerations. The Complaint Management example is used to show the design process. This chapter is intended to help the solution designer to plan and design a solution. It describes design principles and gives an overview of the range of tools and features that can be used to build an IBM Case Manager solution. This chapter includes the following sections: Business goals of a case management solution Designing the solution Creating the solution Defining your solution Configuring your solution Customizing and integrating your solution Documenting your solution

© Copyright IBM Corp. 2013, 2014. All rights reserved.

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6.1 Business goals of a case management solution
The goals of the solution must be understood before you design it. The many different types of case management solutions across many industries have their own unique set of design goals. However, the following common goals are associated with solutions that are built on the IBM Case Manager: Support the knowledge worker to enhance the quality of the decision making for each case Provide faster, more accurate, and fair case resolutions Collect all information that is related to a case, such as documents, activities, and comments Improve productivity by supporting a collaborative environment where information can be securely and easily shared Automatically start activities that are mandatory for the case Automatically start tasks according to predefined conditions or events Allow the case worker to start other optional tasks or add new tasks when needed Provide a framework in which all of the tasks that are related to a case can be started and tracked together in the context of the case Provide auditing information about how case outcomes were determined Allow the case worker to search for cases that are based on categories, data ranges, document content, and so on Allow the case worker to search for ongoing and historic cases Support the use of analytic tools that can help to gain insights from past cases and mitigate risks and reduce fraud Improve agility by using business rules for decision support IBM Case Manager provides many capabilities and tools that can be used to help meet these goals when you design a solution.

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6.2 Designing the solution
This section describes various topics that are related to designing case management solutions. Before you design a solution with IBM Case Manager, you should have a basic understanding of the IBM Case Manager components and data model. For more information about the components, see 3.3, “IBM Case Manager components” on page 42. For more information about the data model, see 4.1, “IBM Case Manager object model” on page 71. Consider reusing an existing solution template and then using your new design as a template for future solutions. For more information about solution templates, see the following sections: 5.3.2, “Creating solution templates” on page 141 5.3.3, “Using solution templates” on page 143 5.3.4, “Exporting and importing a solution” on page 146

6.2.1 Agile and iterative methodologies
One of the most common problems in developing a solution for users is the inability for the user to evaluate and validate the solution before it is completed and deployed. This problem is magnified when you are working with knowledge workers who have an intimate knowledge of the business process and how it can and must be completed. Previous applications were often built by using the traditional waterfall application development methodology. This approach fails to manage the growing complexity and variation of case management solutions. In that approach, requirements are gathered statically and dictated by the capabilities of the technology. IBM Case Manager provides a rich set of tools that allows solutions to be rapidly prototyped and reviewed by the users. The complete initial case definition can be quickly prototyped and provided to the users in a development environment for direct interaction and feedback. They can have hands-on access to the case data, documents, and the tasks. Feedback can be directly modified in the Case Manager Builder tool, which provides continued refinement of the user interface. Iterative methodology helps ensure that the requirements are more inline with what the business requires. It also provides early feedback on what the system looks like and how it behaves. Providing early access to the solution interface provides earlier confirmation of the approach and increased positive adoption of the solution by users.

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Agile and iterative methodology allows the creation of flexible systems that handle adversity and can be delivered in multiple phases. This is a general statement about this approach because individual projects and organizations vary on how they approach projects and the implementation must best serve the solution.

6.2.2 Case design
Case design is the first part of all case management projects, and the most important. A clear and precise definition of what the case is defines all other aspects of the solution. The tasks, document types, rules, and reports are all created and used to support the case. Thus, the identification and definition of the case is crucial. The definition of the case is not always an easy process nor is there a single right answer. The case must be defined in a way that can be applied to the business process and business goal. Sometimes a case, such as a claim, can be easily identified. Sometimes, it might not be so easy to identify what is a case. In general, a case is a business entity that has an identifiable beginning, lifecycle, and end. It often is the focus of a business process that all users interact with and reference. Common case types include a loan, account, policy, and claim. The more clearly defined the case is, the easier it is to find the attributes of it. It is often the situation that a solution requires multiple case types. A good approach is to identify cases as they align with the overall business processes and lifecycle. An example of this can be seen in the banking industry where the underwriting process represents one case that completes by generating another case, the loan.

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After the case is identified, the next part is to obtain the data around it. This data can come from various sources, as shown in Figure 6-1.

Figure 6-1 Multiple sources for case data

As shown in Figure 6-1, the case can interact with that data at any point within the case’s lifecycle. The identification of the interaction points and the timing of the data are part of the design of the case. The case data addresses the following questions: What data is needed to complete the case? What data or systems must be aware of the case’s progress? From which systems does the case need data? What key performance indicators and other reporting metrics are needed against the case? What systems act as the system of record for the data? What synchronization is needed with the case management solution and the system of record (assuming the case management solution is not the system of record)?

6.2.3 Task design
The key concept of case management design is to understand what the various pieces of work in the overall business process are. You can then define them as separate tasks, which become part of the case worker’s tool set. The way to identify these tasks is by looking at how a case can be completed.

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A good place to start is looking at the checklist of activities that the knowledge worker uses to know that a process is completed. It is important to explore all of the activities that might occur within the lifecycle of the case and under which conditions they do occur. It is desirable to generate as complete a list as possible of all of the activities that might occur in a normal process, even those activities that occur only occasionally but can be defined. Look for verbs in requirements to represent discrete activities that can be mapped to an implementable task. After the activities are defined, work with users to understand the following information: How a user interacts with the tasks. When and why the tasks are needed or defined. How and when these tasks must be started. Who works on the tasks. Any dependencies among the defined tasks. Tasks whose start can be determined by system or document events can be configured to start automatically. Those tasks that are started by the knowledge workers are available to the case worker who can decide whether and when they are begun. A task in IBM Case Manager is implemented as a workflow process fragment. A case can have many tasks that are associated with it. Each task involves a fragment of the work that is necessary to complete the case with one or many steps and one or more participants. The tasks can be run in sequence, parallel, independent of each other, or in relation to each other. IBM Case Manager tracks all the tasks in the context of its case. When you design a case management solution, some of the main design decisions are related to the definition of tasks. Common questions include: How do you decide how to break down the necessary work into tasks? Is it better to have bigger tasks that handle larger segment of work, or many smaller tasks? These questions do not have a single answer but there are guidelines that can be followed in determining what is a task. The primary driver is the overall business process that is supported and the logical breakdown of work within the process. A task typically has a clear start event (either system or user) and a defined completion. A typical approach to defining tasks is to limit them to no more than 3 - 5 user steps whenever possible. It is best to try to limit the complexity of individual tasks and use preconditions to manage task order rather than build large complex tasks. This provides greater flexibility within the solution and greater adaptability to changing business needs.

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The following common situations tend to work well when they are modeled as an IBM Case Manager task: You have a defined activity within the lifecycle of a case and can determine the specific event that triggers the initiation of the task. These tasks often represent the key activities in the ideal process lifecycle of a case. You must start work when an event happens and that event can occur at any point in the life of the case. A set of work must be completed, but there is no particular defined sequence in which they must be carried out. This situation is commonly modeled in business process management tools as a star or spider-shaped process diagram. Each branch can be defined as an all-inclusive set of multiple tasks. This requires that when one task is started, each task must be complete for the case to be completed. Decisions and workflow paths are too numerous or complex, and it is simpler to allow knowledge workers to decide whether the work is needed. Defining a long complete sequence of work, such as in a business process management process, that identifies every decision, event, and exception is too involved. Instead, define several tasks, and allow the knowledge worker to decide which tasks must be carried out and when. Workflow paths that depend on various factors that are not known at the time of case creation. These can be defined as discretionary tasks, which give the knowledge worker control.

6.2.4 Case documents
A case almost always includes documents or some form of content. These documents can directly and indirectly support the case. Most content is in the form of documents that arrive throughout the lifecycle of the case, some of which help instantiate a case or tasks and others that are there for support. Content can take nearly any digital format, including forms, audio, images, and video. When you design the document types for a case solution, all of these types must be accounted for. The document type represents the classification of the incoming content and defines the data that is applied to documents of that type. Forms also play a role in what is considered content within the system. A form can be a set of data or help to visual a set of data. The differences here can have some impact on design. Forms that are used for a user interface construct must exist at design time to ensure that it is part of the solution package and to tie it within the user interface. Outside of these design considerations, the rest of the design follows a typical Enterprise Content Management focus. Document types are displayed within the case. They have properties and security that must be implemented.

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6.2.5 Business rules
Within the scope of the case management solution, business rules can be implemented. These business rules are implemented in areas that allow for a more dynamic and flexible solution. Although it is common in the first implementation to not include these rules, they provide a way to separate repeatable or frequently changing business logic outside of the task workflows. Business rules are outside of the tasks that allow for the rule inputs and outputs to be defined independently of the task workflow. The detailed decisions that affect a task routing to be encapsulated within a rule can be called from a single step or multiple steps rather than increase the complexity of the tasks workflow. With the rules being defined externally to the tasks, the same rule can be applied to multiple tasks within a case and modified as needed without requiring the updates to be made to all tasks. After rules are defined, they help ensure consistency and accuracy when data is involved.

6.2.6 Modeling how cases are created
When you design a case management solution, consider how the cases are created. This process depends on the specific application. You can create a case in the following ways when you are using IBM Case Manager: Manually through user action A case worker can actively add a case by using the default add case page. By using this page, the user can enter the case properties directly on the page and create the case. Created when a specified document is created or added A particular document type can be defined to be the initiator of a case. When a document of this type is created, the system automatically creates a case. It then passes the document metadata to the case properties and files the document into the case folder. For example, an insurance application document might automatically create a case. In addition, other users can access a form that can be used to create the case. For example, an online complaint form might be used to create a case. This form is saved as the document type that was defined to initiate the case.

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In a workflow or task process A case can be created within a workflow process that is part of the case, within a task, or an external workflow. By using the ICM_Operations component queue, a workflow process can use the createCaseUsingSpecifiedCaseType operation to create a case. For example, a loan application process can start a case to investigate a potential fraud situation. Programmatically A case can be created programmatically by external systems in one of the following ways: – By using the IBM Case Manager model layer set of JavaScript toolkit API. – By using the Case Representational State Transfer (REST) application programming interface (API). – By using the Content Management Interoperability Services (CMIS) REST API interface. External data services are not started when you use the CMIS REST interface. – By using the Java/.NET/Web Services Content Platform Engine API interface.

6.3 Creating the solution
Creating a case management solution involves the following key levels of effort to build. These levels provide different degrees of complexity and detail but allow for a usable solution to be rapidly developed and made available for customer review. After the requirements and overall approach to the solution are designed, this approach can be used to develop the complete solution that is deployed. This represents one approach to building a solution and does not cover all of the capabilities that are available within IBM Case Manager. This is intended to provide an approach and starting point to building complete solutions: Defining the solution with Case Manager Builder The initial solution can be defined entirely within Case Manager Builder. This initial level provides a solution that can be presented and tested by the users to evaluate the core case definition foundation. The properties, roles, documents, and tasks are available to evaluate. This process can be repeated several times to refine the initial definition and clarify business requirements. The resulting solution generally results in a prototype but can represent a complete solution for simpler business cases.

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Refining the solution by using more advanced configuration Other tools that are available within IBM Case Manager provide the ability to further enhance the initial definition by using other available functionality. After the core definition is completed, the solution can be further extended through configuration to provide more detail and specific functions that are required. This can be accomplished through configuration by using more advanced tools, such as Process Designer, without the need for coding. Customizing the solution by using custom code Most real-world implementations require a degree of custom development that in most cases involves connectivity to external data sources. Separating this development from the definition and configuration allows for it to be managed separately and in a more traditional development approach. The custom developed pieces can then be added to the existing solution when they are completed and then the complete solution is deployed. The more functionality that can be included through definition and configuration, the easier the solution is to develop and maintain. Utmost effort often is made to meet requirements through definition and configuration. Not all customization can be eliminated, but the flexibility of the tools that are included in IBM Case Manager can reduce this effort.

6.4 Defining your solution
The goal of the definition activities is to rapidly create a solution that can be presented to users and updated based on feedback by using the Case Manager Builder tool. This process can be repeated several times before it is move to configuration as multiple prototypes. The resulting definition provides the fundamental structure of the solution, including the data model and tasks without the need for any programming or scripting. For more information about the IBM Case Manager data model concept, see 4.1, “IBM Case Manager object model” on page 71. The definition of the solution normally involves direct participation by the line-of-business experts and representatives of each of the roles within the solution. These experts have in-depth knowledge of the overall process and how the defined solution fits their needs. Applying their feedback to subsequent iterations of the definition results in better alignment with the needs and goals of the project.

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6.4.1 Defining case properties
The solution properties are used to describe and identify each case for search, processing, reporting, and auditing purposes. The defined properties also are used to define the properties that are applied to document types. Solution properties are available within the Content Platform Engine object store and are available for reuse by other solutions. The use of existing properties enables the solution developer to maintain a uniform document taxonomy for all solutions and items that are defined within the solution. For each property, the following information must be provided: Data type (string, Boolean, date-time, float, or integer) Single value or multiple value Optionally, the following information can be provided for a property: Maximum length (string) or minimum or maximum value (integer) Default value Choice list (integer and string)

6.4.2 Defining case types
Each solution in IBM Case Manager can have one or more case types. A case type is made up of properties, views, folders, and tasks. It is a specific instance type of the overall case that was defined. The Case type is a level of encapsulation of the overall case into a specific business case. Each case type that is defined in a solution shares the following resources with other case types: Pool of properties available in the solution Document types in the solution Roles and in-baskets that are defined in the solution

6.4.3 Defining document types
Each solution has zero or more document types defined. Document types are defined within Case Manager Builder, and can have properties that are associated with them from the list of available properties in the solution. Default document types are available in the Content Platform Engine object store. Reusing document types allows the solution developer to maintain a uniform document taxonomy for all solutions. Document types also include documents that are stored as structured form data objects.

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Remember: Not all documents that are stored in cases by the users must be identified as a solution document type. Any document in the system can be stored in a case folder. However, those document types that trigger case creation, start tasks, or have specific meaning and purpose within the solution must be identified in Case Manager Builder. The Complaint Management solution example has the following document types: Correspondence: Triggers a task for document approval before it is mailed to the complainant Supporting Document: Used for any other document that is filed into a case, such as an email or scanned in letter

6.4.4 Defining roles
Roles are representative of the types of individuals or groups of individuals that perform actions within the solution. Create a role for any functional group or type of user that acts as a participant in a task. In addition, roles can be defined for non-active task participants who can interact with the cases.

6.4.5 Defining in-baskets
In-basket definition creates a base in-basket configuration. Each role has a shared work queue and a single in-basket for that queue. When you define the in-basket, you set up the properties that display, the ability to sort, the default sort order, and any filter options. All work that is assigned to this role within the task map that was created in Step Editor goes to these shared work queues. The work is presented in the in-baskets that are defined in Case Manager Builder.

6.4.6 Defining pages
Page definition provides an opportunity to modify the default page layouts within Case Manager Builder to meet the overall page structure that is wanted within the solution. The Page Designer gives extensive control over the design of the user interface. In the initial definition, it is effective to modify only the existing pages to provide a baseline design of the overall solution. Page layout changes can be made within the configuration of the solution. The goal of the definition is to establish the core case and flow of the case rather than focusing on the details of the user interface. The page modifications within the definition can be limited to the widgets and their layout on the default pages.

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6.4.7 Defining case types
One of the key aspects of the initial design is the identification of the case types. It is here that those cases are defined. Within the solution, each of the case types are defined within Case Manager Builder. The properties, views, folders, and tasks for each case are defined for that case. Each case type that is defined in a solution shares with other case types: Pool of properties available in the solution Document types in the solution Roles and in-baskets that are defined in the solution

6.4.8 Defining views
There are three primary views available within a case definition. The Case Summary view contains the properties that are returned from searches and included in the summary view of the case. The Case Search view identifies the properties that are available to search for a case. The Properties Layout view provides the ability to define how properties are presented to users when they process a task step or open a case. In the definition of the solution, the initial view of the case properties is laid out and applied to the Properties widget of the appropriate pages. The flexibility of the Properties Layout view reduces the need to use forms to present case and workflow properties to users. More views can be refined and adjusted within the configuration to create task step or role-specific views.

6.4.9 Defining tasks
The definition of the tasks often is the most time-consuming portion of the overall case definition. The tasks and the activities they perform are outlined in the design must be defined at this point. The name, type, preconditions, and process flow are set for each task. Each task often is given a name that provides the user with a general description of what the task does. The name of each task often starts with an action word, such as “Review”, “Perform”, “Assess”, and “Update”. After the task is named, it is necessary to define the characteristics of the task and how it starts, whether it is required, visibility, and preconditions.

How tasks are started
A task can start automatically based on an event that is occurring within a case. When a task is set to start automatically, it starts when the defined preconditions are met (if there are any) without the need of user actions.

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A task can be started manually by a user. Manually started tasks are created when the preconditions (if there are any) are met. After a manual task is created, a user can start or disable the task. Discretionary tasks are tasks that do not have preconditions and are based on the decisions of the user when to create these tasks. These tasks are often the activities that are most variable and require the expertise of the knowledge worker to determine when they need to run rather than an easily definable condition.

Required tasks
This type of task is one that the case state cannot be set to completed until this task is completed.

Hidden tasks
Defining a task as hidden still allows a task to run and perform all of its actions, but the task is not visible to users when the list of tasks that are running within the case is reviewed. The most common use for hidden tasks is for background tasks that perform automated processes, such as data synchronization from other systems.

Preconditions
For automatic and manual tasks, it is necessary to define the business preconditions under which that task is created. When a task is set with no preconditions, it is created at the same time that the case is created. For tasks that can run only after the case is created, the preconditions must be defined. Task preconditions can be evaluated based on the filing of a document within a case or under the conditions of a property being set or changed. The condition is evaluated when the defined event is met. Defining preconditions that are based on the combination of document arrival, multiple property changes, and property values provides the ability to meet most business needs in defining the conditions under which tasks are created. The following condition evaluations can be defined: A document is filed in the case. This condition allows for the definition of which document types create the task. It can be defined to occur when any document type is filed within the case or from the list of document types that are defined within the solution. When the expected document types are filed within the case, any other property conditions that were set are then evaluated.

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A property condition is met. This condition evaluates the value of the specified case property and creates the task when the defined property conditions are met. A case property is updated. This condition allows for the evaluation of a set of property conditions when there is a change to one or more selected case properties.

Repeatable
Tasks with a document that is filed and property condition is met can be set as repeatable. A repeatable task is one that can be run more than once in the lifecycle of a case and must run when the precondition is met. Table 6-1 shows the task types, their characteristics, and the use cases.
Table 6-1 Task types comparison Task type Required Automatic Required Automatic with property preconditions Optional Automatic with property preconditions Required Manual Required Manual with property preconditions Optional Manual Optional Manual with property preconditions Started by: User Repeatable: Yes Characteristics Started by: System Repeatable: Yes Use cases A workflow that runs when the case is created. It must be completed. A workflow that runs whenever a property condition is met when the case is created or after a property value changes. It must be completed. A user can start the workflow by updating the case properties to meet the preconditions. Same as required automatic, except this task does not have to be completed to complete the case. A workflow that runs when a user starts. It must be completed. A workflow that runs when a user starts it. It must be completed. A user can start the workflow only if the precondition is met. A workflow that runs when a user starts it. This task does not have to be completed. When the precondition is satisfied, the user can start the workflow. This task is the same as optional manual, but has property preconditions.

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Task type When a document of a certain type is added precondition When a document of any type is added precondition User created task (discretionary)

Characteristics Started by: System or user Repeatable: Yes

Use cases A required, optional automatic, or manual workflow process that runs when a document of a certain type is filed in the case. If the task is flagged as repeatable, every document of that type that is received starts the workflow. A required, optional automatic, or manual workflow process that runs when a document of any type is filed in the case. If the task is flagged as repeatable, every document that is received starts the workflow.

Started by: User Repeatable: Yes

A predefined workflow that is started by a user where the user can name the task and supply the start parameters. These parameters include case properties, user or workgroup assignment, and documents to attach to the workflow.

The use of all-inclusive and mutually exclusive sets
An all-inclusive set is a group of tasks in which if any of the tasks in the set is started, all of the tasks must be completed. An all-inclusive set is a way to designate a group of tasks as having to be completed for the case to be completed. All-inclusive sets form a simple abstraction of parallel and required work activity. In practice, all-inclusive sets are often used with a group of optional manual tasks. When a user starts or disables one of the tasks, the other tasks in the group also must be started or disabled. Mutually exclusive sets are groups of tasks in which only one of the tasks within the set can be run within the lifecycle of the case and starting any of these tasks disables the remaining tasks.

Task steps
With the task properties and preconditions set, the focus can shift to defining the underlying workflow of the task. This is where all of the users steps of the task are to be defined and placeholders for system steps can be created. The focus of the task workflow definition is to identify the role, decisions, and properties of each user step of that task’s workflow.

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6.5 Configuring your solution
This section describes the features, benefits, and considerations of the advanced configuration capabilities that are available with IBM Case Manager. As in defining the solution, the capabilities that are outlined in this section require no coding or scripting. A good understanding of the IBM Case Manager architecture is needed. Many capabilities that are outlined in this section are available by using enhanced capabilities of the Case Manager Builder and the IBM FileNet Process Designer to make direct modifications to the solution. Other configuration capabilities are available by using other products that are bundled with IBM Case Manager

6.5.1 Advanced in-basket configuration
When the solution was defined, a single in-basket was created for each of the roles that were created. In a real-world environment, a greater division of work is needed and more in-baskets can be defined to further separate the work within a queue. You can use the Process Configuration Console through Process Designer to configure more in-baskets in IBM Case Manager. Each extra in-basket that is configured for a role is displayed as an extra tab on the Work page. The added in-baskets are configured to define the properties and work items that are returned to the user. In-baskets are configured to provide the following specific presentations and capabilities of the work queues or inbox: Adding system fields as columns Fields that were not defined in the Case Manager Builder but are available in the system and can be added to the work queue and in-basket as columns. The use of pre-filtered, sorted in-baskets Different views of work queues can be displayed to a user or role by configuring more in-baskets that contain pre-filtered, sorted work items. Setting the order of in-baskets The order in which in-baskets are displayed in the Case Manager Client can be configured.

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Definition of properties that can be filtered by the user or through widget wiring In addition to allowing users to filter work items for search purposes, filter definitions can be wired with other widgets to enable a runtime filtering capability. This runtime filter allows the solution designer to create in-baskets that present the worklist for users filter for their specific context within the application. As an example, a user might select their role and geographical region and see only in-basket work items that pertain to that geographical region.

Multiple in-baskets per role
Having only one in-basket per role is often a limiting factor for solutions and makes it more difficult for users to find their work or determine which work to select. More in-baskets can be created and assigned to roles within the same queue to provide the ability to group work in the manner that the business selects and processes work.

In-baskets from multiple queues
In-baskets from multiple queues can be associated with a role. This allows a user to access various work from a single role. This is often used to provide supervisors or managers direct access to the same in-baskets as the roles that they manage.

6.5.2 Advanced property layout views within a case
The initial property layout view that is built in the definition provides a starting point for presenting case properties when a user opens a case or a task work item. When you examine the advanced configuration of the property layout views, views often are created for the following ways in which users can view the case: Hide fields on case details pages There are often instances where there is a need to show only a portion of the case properties or adjust the properties that are shown for specific roles. Property layout views allow for the configuration of varying displays of case properties and the ability to select the properties that are shown. Make case properties read-only on case details pages Each field within a property layout view can be set as read-only. This allows control over which properties can be changed by users when a case is viewed. This functionality extends to individual property control at the case detail page level.

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Enhance field level flexibility Individual properties can be further controlled by applying formatting definitions to the fields.

6.5.3 Configuring pages for advanced user interfaces
Most case management solutions must provide different views of the case and work items that are based on the user’s role or the step that is being processed. Multiple page layouts must be configured to meet these requirements. The Case Manager Builder interface provides business analysts and solution developers with the ability to modify and configure pages. This configuration can be the modification of an existing page or the configuration of a new page. After the pages are configured, they can be associated with the following different roles for case details pages or workflow steps for work details pages: Case views that are based on user’s role Specific views that are based on workflow steps Task-specific start step pages

Additional widgets on the work and case pages
With the ability to copy or create pages that are used within different portions of the case, it is common for these pages to have different layouts or contain different widgets. When pages are configured for each role or step, the widgets that are chosen for the page and their configurations often are based on the primary functions that the user is performing on the page. Advanced widgets, such as the case visualizer or custom widgets that are developed for Case Manager, can extend the functionality that is available in the configuration of pages.

6.5.4 Advanced task configuration
The use of Case Manager Builder with FileNet Process Designer to configure solutions is known as round-tripping. The solution designer goes back and forth between Case Manager Builder and FileNet Process Designer to use the most advanced functions. This configuration is an important aspect of building solutions with IBM Case Manager. For more information, see Chapter 12, “Advanced solution topics” on page 453. For more information about capabilities that are available within the FileNet Process Designer, see Introducing IBM FileNet Business Process Manager, SG24-7509.

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Advanced routing
Case Manager Builder allows the business analyst to assign responses to routes in the process. It is common for workflow routing to be dependent on workflow and case properties in addition to (or in some cases, instead of) a response by a user. By using Process Designer, routes can have broader and more complex branching calculations.

Updating case properties
Case properties can be updated directly by the workflow by using an Assign system step. The following actions within the workflow process and the results of system steps and actions can directly modify the case properties: Gathering data from other systems Case properties can be populated with data from other systems. Workflow processes can obtain this data by using dbexecute system steps, other system steps, Web Services steps, or custom component integration operations. Sending case data to other systems When data from the case management solution is required by other systems, tasks workflow processes can send case data by using the built-in Web Services capabilities.

Defining custom workflow parameters
Case properties live within the case and are available to all tasks and activities that interact with the case. When there is the need for properties that are only needed within the context of the task and are not needed after the task is completed, they are configured as custom workflow parameters. This configuration defines the temporary properties or properties with a limited scope of focus within the task. These properties can still be available to the user at each of the individual user steps of the workflow process and used in In-baskets to present the data to users.

Running ICM_Operations
IBM Case Manager includes ICM_Operation component functions that provide advanced case interactions that can be used within task workflows. These functions provide many of the common case interactions that are performed by the system as a workflow runs.

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ICM_Operations also includes the function to run the rule operations. The Case Manager Builder Step Editor provides the ability to add a rule step to the workflow but the Process Designer must be used in cases where custom parameters must be passed into the rule.

Performing system and component steps
In Case Manager Builder Step Editor, placeholders can be added to the workflow to represent system activities that are needed within the process. Within Process Designer, you can configure the activities that those steps perform. These steps can be system steps or component steps that offer various automated functionalities to enhance the workflow.

Working with document attachments
Document attachments provide a way of highlighting key documents that are associated with a task and the ability to update and modify the document as needed. By using the standard ICM_Operations, a task that starts when a document is filed in the case can file the document in a specified location of the case. CE_Operations can be used to modify the document and update any necessary properties. For more information, see 11.2, “Automated handling of ingested documents” on page 413

6.5.5 Using forms to enhance user interfaces
Forms in IBM Case Manager are used to extend the available data collection capabilities. Although the property view layout features significantly reduce the need to use forms, it is not eliminated completely. There are certain situations where forms can be used to extend the functionality of a solution. The property view layout designer has reduced the need for forms within Case Manager solution, but there is still instances where the use of forms is a benefit. IBM Case Manager supports FileNet eForms and IBM Forms. Form templates use the available forms design, templates, validation, and runtime scripting capabilities. This section outlines these capabilities. Remember: Each form product has its own unique user interface functions and features. For example, IBM Forms supports dynamic forms. These forms allow the visibility of form fields, controls, and sections to be controlled that are based on pre-filled data and field value entries, such as property information.

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Forms in IBM Case Manager provide the following functions: Dynamic forms interface Forms to create or edit form data objects in cases Form policy-based operations to create cases

Dynamic forms interface
A typical presentation to the user provides a static view of the case properties. There are times when there is a need to dynamically present the properties that are relative to the values of other properties. For example, when a Boolean property indicates whether an address was collected, you might want to show those address fields and not show them when the property is false. This is one example of how a form might need to be dynamic.

Form to create or edit form data objects in cases
A form template can be attached to a workflow and presented to the user within the Form Widget. When a form is presented this way, the template and the form data are filed within the case as a document. This form data object can be accessed as any other document within a case. Form data objects can be extended to provide more business object functionality by extending the form data object class. This extended object class can be configured to use case properties, such as enabling normalized data collection in the case. The extended form data object class can be added to the solution to allow you to define its uses in the solution. This method is useful for collecting structured data objects that are to be used for analysis and reporting purposes.

Form policy-based operations to create cases
The following techniques can be used to create cases by using a form policy: By using a form document policy, a form can be used to create a form data object. This object is designed as the Starting document type for a case type in the solution. By using a form workflow policy, a form can be used to start a workflow process that runs any number of process operations. These operations can include the creation of the case folder by, for example, having a step in the process that calls the createCaseUsingSpecifiedCaseType operation in ICM_Operations. Tip: These techniques do not require users to be logged in to IBM Case Manager to create cases. For example, links to these form policies can be published to a portal where users can complete a form to start the case.

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6.5.6 Providing users with custom tasks
In many case solutions, it is not possible to define every possible task that might occur in the lifecycle of a case. When it is common that there are variations in the types of tasks that are run or it is difficult to clearly define those tasks, custom tasks can be activated for the solution. By using custom tasks, users can create ad hoc tasks that define the tasks flow at run time. Great care must be used when this functionality is provided so that overuse and the resulting avoidance of the use of defined tasks by the users is avoided. It is recommended that this functionality is provided only to advanced knowledge workers and carefully tracking is done by using reports and analytics.

6.5.7 Configuring the security definitions
The configuration of case security uses security modeling that is part of the Case Foundation Platform. Case Manager solutions have several areas of consideration for security. Some are managed within the Case Manager Builder while others require Administration Console for Content Platform Engine. The following aspects of security definitions must be considered when you set up your production environment: Case Content security Role security Page security

Case content security
Each case type is defined by a corresponding case folder class in the target object store. This class can be modified to deny users and groups permission to the case instances. Modify the default instance security of the case folder class with the Administration Console for Content Platform Engine. Setting the appropriate security on the case type class, case folder class, and task classes controls who has permissions to those objects. These permissions include creating cases, accessing case information, creating tasks, and other actions. Security also can be set on the document classes that are associated with a case type. Each document class that is defined within Case Manager Builder creates a corresponding document class when it is deployed. Access to these document classes can be controlled as any other content object.

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Role security
Role membership is controlled through the management of roles within the Case Manager Client. When a page is configured to include the Manage Role button, users with access to that page can associate users of groups with the roles that are defined for the solution. This configuration controls the list of roles that are available to a user and the queues that are associated with those roles. More detailed security can be applied to roles and queues by using the Process Configuration Console.

Page security
Most page-level security within Case Manager is handled through the association of task detail and add task pages and their association with specific steps in the task workflow processes. Case detail pages and solution pages are managed through Case Manager Builder. The Case detail page that is presented to the user when they open a case is determined by the default case detail page and the ability to associate specific case detail pages with specific roles. Also, the solution pages that are available to a role is configured within the Case Manager Builder in the same location that the roles are defined.

6.5.8 Configuring case analytics and reporting
Case analyzer manages the data that is used in providing analytics and reports for IBM Case Manager solutions. Case, task, and workflow information is collected from logs and added to an analytics database. Reporting tools can then use this database to generate in-progress and historical information. Case analyzer processes this information into cubes and fact tables.

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Cubes
Cubes are multi-dimensional tables of information. The types of cubes that are managed by Case Analyzer are listed in Table 6-2.
Table 6-2 Types of cubes that are supported by Case Analyzer Cube Case load Cases in progress Task load Tasks in progress Queue load Work in progress Description Stores historical information about the number of cases in process during a specified time. Stores nearly up-to-the-moment information about all cases that are in progress in the system. The information includes the number of cases, processing times, and status. Stores historical information about the number of tasks in process during a specified time. Stores nearly up-to-the-moment information about all tasks that are in progress in the system. The information includes the number of tasks, processing times, and status. Stores historical information about the amount of work that is done in each queue during a specified time period. Stores nearly up-to-the-moment information about all work that is in the system. The information includes the number of work items, processing times, and status. The information can be broken down by workflow or work item and by user. Stores historical information about processing time for work items during a specified time. The information can be broken down by user. Stores historical information about the number of work items going from a source step to a destination step. The information can be broken down by user, time, and exposed user-defined fields. Stores historical information about the amount of work that is done in the system during a specified time. Stores nearly up-to-the-moment information about all work that is in the system. The information includes the number of work items, processing times, and status. The information can be broken down by workflow or work item.

Work item processing time Routing

Work load Workflow in progress

Reporting by using cubes enables reports to be “sliced and diced” and users can drill down to obtain more detail. Cubes often are used to supply summarized information about cases, tasks, and workflow information.

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IBM Case Manager includes reports that are based on Microsoft Excel. These standard reports provide a basis for configuring new reports, as required.

Fact tables
Fact tables are single-dimensional tables of information. By using fact tables, you can generate reports that contain detailed case information. Reports list all cases, tasks, or workflows and can group, total, and provide averages by using tabular calculations in the report. The fact tables do not summarize the data directly from multiple cases, tasks, or workflows.

Exposed field
An exposed field in the reporting database is a case property or a workflow data field. Each cube (fact) table can have zero or more exposed fields. Exposing fields allows case properties to be made available for reporting purposes. Configuring a solution for reporting involves creating exposed fields and setting up reports. This process can use Cognos BI, Microsoft Excel, or other tools that can generate reports from a reporting database. In the Complaint Management solution example, the following case properties might be exposed for reporting: Complaint Type, Received Date, and Customer number. Cognos BI can be used to generate graphical reports that show the frequency of complaints that are submitted by Complaint Type.

Generating detailed reports on cases in progress
Case properties to be used in the reports are set up as exposed fields. These exposed fields are then added to the Case In Progress fact tables. Reports are generated from the fact tables.

Generating detailed reports on completed cases
Case properties that are used in the reports are set up as exposed fields. These exposed fields are then added to the Case Load fact tables. Reports are generated from the fact tables.

Generating detailed reports on tasks or workflows in progress
Properties and data fields that are used in the reports are set up as exposed fields. These exposed fields are the added to the task or workflow in progress fact tables. Reports are generated from the fact tables.

Generating graphical, historical management reports
Properties and data fields that are used in the reports are set up as exposed fields. These exposed fields are then added to the cubes that are used for the management reports. Reports are generated from the cubes.

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Storing reports in cases
Reports that are an object format, such as Microsoft Excel or Word or a PDF, can be stored in the target object store as documents and opened by users. These documents can be generated and viewed, for example, in situations where decision making on specific cases depends on status or management reports on other cases.

6.5.9 Configuring the Cognos Real-Time Monitor
By using real-time monitoring, you can present key performance indicators that are used by line-of-business managers. Dashboard objects can display summary and detailed performance information that is based on business matrixes. For example, dashboards objects can be configured to show the number of cases that are created over a specific period. Because real-time monitoring uses the same cubes and fact tables that are used in reporting, similar procedures are used to extend the reporting database to display case, task, and workflow information. Dashboard objects can then be configured to display more information as required.

Modifying dashboard objects with case properties
As in reporting, case properties that are used in the dashboard objects must be set up as exposed fields. These exposed fields are then added to the Case In Progress cube. Dashboard objects are modified or created by using the cube (summary dashboard objects) or fact tables (detailed dashboard objects).

Create watch point email notifications
Watch points enable line-of-business managers to receive emails when a threshold is reached, such as when more than the expected number of cases are generated. Watch points can be configured directly on the real-time monitor dashboard objects.

6.6 Customizing and integrating your solution
Most of the functions that are required by solutions can be met through solution definition and configuration. In many cases, there still are requirements that are beyond the scope of functionality that can be configured. In these cases, it becomes necessary to customize the solution. It is recommended that configuration be used as much as possible to meet these requirements as customization increases the effort to build and support the solution.

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IBM Case Manager includes an extensive set of options for customizing solutions to meet the various needs of projects. The following tools can be used for customization: Custom widgets External Data Services Custom workflow components Extending forms Published APIs

Custom widgets
When the standard widgets cannot provide the functionality that is required for a solution, custom widgets can be developed and configured into the solution pages to meet these needs. Developers can develop custom widgets that can be placed on a page and interact with the standard and any other custom widgets that might be there. A custom widget is available to all solutions within an environment that allows more generic custom widgets to be used in multiple solutions. A custom widget can be developed generically with the intent for reuse or for a specific solution that addresses specific needs. For more information about custom widgets, see 10.5, “Creating and deploying a custom widget” on page 386.

External data services
You can use the external data service (EDS) representational state transfer (REST) protocol to create an external data service to get data from an external source (such as a file or a table in a database) to customize field properties and manage property behavior in Case Manager. External data services provide the following abilities: Interface between cases and other information sources Load case data at query time Enables real-time presentation and storage of case data For more information about the external data services, see 14.6, “External data service” on page 557.

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Custom workflow components
When a custom action is required within a task workflow process that cannot be met by the standard system steps or included components, a custom component step can be developed. Many connections to external systems can be accomplished through database connectivity or a web service, both of which are standard system steps. When these steps are not available or the functionality cannot be achieved without customization, the following custom component steps can be developed to meet this functionality: Automated work processing that is performed by Java object or Java Message Service (JMS) queue Runs functions from within a workflow Extends process functionality without full application deployment For more information about workflow components, see 14.5.1, “Custom components” on page 556

Extending forms
IBM Forms and FileNet eForms can be extended by using scripting. By using scripting, the forms can be more flexible within the user interface or provide interaction with external systems. FileNet eForm provides JavaScript API. The API is often used to develop enhanced forms that are used for data entry. IBM Form has server APIs that provide low-level access to XFDL forms in Java, C, and COM. With these APIs, you can develop applications that analyze, validate, and create XFDL forms. IBM Form also provides Functional Call Interface for runtime custom XFDL capabilities.

Published APIs
Case Manager includes several published APIs that allow for customization in each of the outlined methods. This provides the full flexibility and control over solutions that are needed to meet the most demanding requirements. The following APIs are available that allow the developer to select the most appropriate choice for their needs: IBM Case Manager JavaScript API Use this API to customize your Case Manager Client application. IBM Case Manager Java API Use this API to create servlets for custom web applications and to develop custom component queue applications.

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Content Platform Engine add-on extensions for Case Manager Builder Use these add-on extensions to access the custom metadata and data that is stored in object stores. IBM CMIS for FileNet Content Manager Use the IBM Content Management Interoperability Services (CMIS) for FileNet Content Manager to enable applications and clients that use the OASIS CMIS standard to access content that is stored on Content Platform Engine. In a case management application, you use CMIS to manage the case folders and documents and to retrieve case information. For more information about the APIs, see Chapter 14, “Integration points” on page 545.

6.7 Documenting your solution
Case Manager Builder enables the solution designer to effectively capture requirements directly into the tool. A document can then be generated by using the available solution description generation tool that contains all of the configuration data within your solution. This solution description document provides a way to communicate and present the configuration details of the solution for review, discussion, and analysis. The Solution Document Generator is a command-line tool. For more information about how to use it, see the IBM Case Manager Version 5.2 Information Center at this website: http://pic.dhe.ibm.com/infocenter/casemgmt/v5r2m0

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Figure 6-2 shows part 1 of an example of the documentation that is generated.

Figure 6-2 Generated documentation: Part 1

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Figure 6-3 shows the remaining part of the documentation that is generated.

Figure 6-3 Generated documentation: Part 2

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Chapter 7.

Building a simple solution: Part 1
This chapter and Chapter 8, “Building a simple solution: Part 2” on page 267 describe how to build a simple solution. The use case that was introduced in 2.2, “Complaints management example use case” on page 29 is used to show a step-by-step procedure for building your solution. In later chapters in this book, we build on top of this use case to introduce other features and capabilities, such as case splitting, customizing user interface, and deployment. This chapter includes the following sections: Building the sample solution overview Defining the solution basics Defining the case type Defining embedded rules Defining case tasks

© Copyright IBM Corp. 2013, 2014. All rights reserved.

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7.1 Building the sample solution overview
The Customer Complaints solution is a simple solution that is intended to show much of the IBM Case Manager functionality. However, the solution is kept simple for easier reading and understanding. The Customer Complaints solution describes the use of following IBM Case Manager functions: Smaller task-based processes Container tasks Automatic, required, and manual tasks Mutually exclusive task sets Document-based preconditions Property-based preconditions Preconditions that are based on property updates In this chapter, we break down building the sample Customer Complaints solution to the following basic steps: 1. Defining the solution basics: – – – – – – – – – – – Adding a solution Setting up properties Setting up roles Setting up in-baskets Setting up document types Creating a case type Configuring case type properties Configuring the Case Summary view Configuring custom properties layout view Configuring the case search Defining case folders structure

2. Defining the case type:

3. Defining embedded rules. 4. Defining case tasks: – – – – – – – – – Creating Upgrade Options set Creating the Upsell Opportunity container task Creating the Upgrade Product task Creating the Upgrade Plan task Creating the Call Customer task Creating the Verify Billing task Creating the Verify Complaint task Creating the remaining tasks (as listed in Table 7-6 on page 247) Reviewing task summary

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The rest of the steps for building the sample solution are described in Chapter 8, “Building a simple solution: Part 2” on page 267

7.2 Defining the solution basics
By using IBM Case Manager Builder, we define the solution basics for the Customer Complaints solution. This section describes the following steps: Adding a solution Setting up properties Setting up roles Setting up in-baskets Setting up document types In 7.3, “Defining the case type” on page 227, we describe the creation of case types by using the properties, roles, in-baskets, and document types that are set up in this section.

7.2.1 Adding a solution
To create and define the basic solution information, complete the following steps: 1. Log in to Case Manager Builder by using the following URL: http://:/CaseBuilder Make sure to log in with a user that has sufficient rights to create the case solution, as shown in Figure 7-1.

Figure 7-1 Logging in to Case Manager Builder

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2. In the Manage Solutions window, click Add Solution, as shown in Figure 7-2.

Figure 7-2 Creating a solution by using the wizard

3. Name the solution and provide the following information: – Enter the name of the solution Customer Complaints in the Name field. – Enter a 2 - 5 alphanumeric character prefix that starts with an alphabetic character in the Solution prefix field. This sample solution uses the prefix CC. A unique solution prefix is required to prefix all object types that are used in the solution. – Select the icon for the solution. The solution icon represents the solution type, such as Aerospace, Energy, or Financial. IBM Case Manager is bundled with a set of default solution icons.

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Figure 7-3 shows the results of naming the solution.

Figure 7-3 Naming the solution

7.2.2 Setting up properties
To set up properties for the solution, complete the following steps: 1. Click the Properties tab. 2. Click Add Property  New, as shown in Figure 7-4.

Figure 7-4 Setting up new property

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3. Use the information from to Table 7-1 on page 218 to enter the property definition for Address, as shown in Figure 7-5. a. b. c. d. For the property Name field, enter Customer Address. For property Type, select String. Expand Define Property Values and enter 200 for Maximum length. Click OK to continue.

Tip: The basic property types are string, integer, datetime, float, and Boolean. Properties can be a single value or multiple values. The Customer Complaint solution uses only single values.

Figure 7-5 Setting up Customer Address property

4. In the same manner, add the rest of the properties that are listed in Table 7-1 on page 218. 5. For the property with choice list, select your choice in the Manage Choice Lists Name field. For example, complete the following steps to define the choice list Case Sources as shown in Figure 7-6 on page 217: a. Enter Case Sources in the Manage Choice Lists Name field. b. To add a choice, click Add Choice Item and enter the choice information. In the example, enter Form for Display Name and Value. c. Repeat these to add the following choice items for Case Sources choice list: Form, Email, Fax, and Letter

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d. Click OK to complete the choice list.

Figure 7-6 Adding a choice list

e. To verify the choice list you just added, select the choice list for the property. In the example, the Case Sources choice list is selected for the property Case Source, as shown in Figure 7-7.

Figure 7-7 Example of a property with choice list

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Tip: You can select a default value from the choice list. However, the example does not use a default value. Click Save after you complete the properties configuration. f. To add another choice list, click Add Choice List. Table 7-1 shows the complete choice list that we add for the solution. g. When you finish creating all of the choice lists, click Close. 6. Repeat steps 1 - 5 to complete the solution properties by using Table 7-1. Table 7-1 shows a complete choice list we use for our sample solution.
Table 7-1 Complaint solution property choice list Choice list Case Sources Case States Complaint Categories Upgrade Category Choice Item Form, Email, Fax, Letter Open, Closed, Processing, Pending, On Hold Product, Billing, Service, Other Product, Service Plan

Table 7-2 shows the sample solution properties.
Table 7-2 Complaint solution properties Property Case Number Case Source Complaint Category Complaint Description Complaint Received Date Complaint Status Customer Name Type String(10) String(64), Choice list: Case Sources String(64), Choice list: Complaint Categories String(1000) DateTime String(64), Choice list: Case States String(64) Description Auto-generated case number. The channel on which the complaint was received. The type of complaint that was submitted. The description of the complaint that was submitted. The date and time the complaint is received. The status of the complaint. The first and surname of the customer, which was obtained from the CRM system.

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Property Customer Number Customer City Customer Address Customer Rating Customer Since Customer State Customer Email

Type String(10) String(64) String(200) String(64) Integer String(64) String(64)

Description The customer number that is used to query the CRM system. Customer city, which is obtained from the CRM system. Customer street name, which is obtained from the CRM system. Calculated value that indicates how the customer is rated. The number of years the customer was with the company. Customer state, which is obtained from the CRM system. The email address of the customer, which is obtained from the CRM system. The part number of the product that is specified in the complaint. This property is set to true if a safety check is required. The transaction amount that is filed in the complaint. The customer telephone number, which is obtained from the CRM system. Set to true if the complaint is a valid complaint. The type of upgrade requested. Set to true if there is a possibility of a product or non-product upsell.

Part Number Safety Check Total Transaction Amount Telephone

String(64) Boolean Float String(64)

Valid Upgrade Category Upsale Opportunity

Boolean String(64), Choice list: Upgrade Category Boolean

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Indexing and performance consideration: The Case Manager Builder application does not provide a method for indexing property values. To index a property, you must use the FileNet Enterprise Manager or Administrative Console on the target object store to set the index property for simple indexes. For more complex indexes, use the database tool to define them. Properties that are used as case search criteria often require indexing to improve performance. Monitor your system during testing and in production to determine the final set of properties to configure for indexing. For more information, see “Indexing IBM FileNet P8 Content Engine databases”, which is available at this website: http://pic.dhe.ibm.com/infocenter/p8docs/v5r2m0/topic/com.ibm.p8.per formance.doc/p8ppt121.htm Part of the completed property list looks similar to the list that is shown in Figure 7-8.

Figure 7-8 Completed properties

7.2.3 Setting up roles
After you set up the properties for your solution, create the role and select the type of in-baskets to display for the role. To configure role view for the personal in-basket, complete the following steps: 1. Select the Roles tab and click Add Role. 2. Enter the following role information: a. For the role field, enter Contact Center.

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b. For the role description, enter These workers handle calls and email complaints. c. Select Personal (Role) for type of in-basket, as shown in Figure 7-9, This show a custom view for this role. d. Allow user to move work into personal in-basket and reassign work to others, as shown in Figure 7-9.

Figure 7-9 Defining Contact Center Role

Tip: The type of personal in-basket to display for a role can be customized. The following selections are available: Personal (Common): Show the common view: Defines a common in-basket for every role. Personal (Role): Show the custom view: Defines an in-basket specific for the role. Do not show common or role personal in-baskets: Show just personal inbox: Not role in-basket is shown for the role.

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3. Repeat steps 1 - 4 to complete the solution roles by using the information that is provided in Table 7-3.
Table 7-3 Customer Complaint solution roles Role Contact Center Investigator Manager Specialist Billing Agent Sales Agent In-basket Contact Center Investigator Manager Specialist Billing Agent Sales Agent Description These workers handle calls and email complaints. This role performs detailed investigation on complaints when required. This role is for the manager of the complaint Contact Center workers. Members of this role handle product-specific complaints. These workers handle billing-specific complaints. This role is for the sales agents who interact with customers for any sales opportunities.

7.2.4 Setting up in-baskets
Role in-baskets contain work items that are assigned to a role. Within an in-basket, you can define the columns that you want to show for the role, such as filters and sort. To set up the in-baskets, complete the following steps: 1. Click the In-baskets tab. 2. Click Contact Center in-basket and then click the In-basket General tab. 3. Select the solution properties to be included in the in-basket display for the role. These properties are included in Case Manager Client when users access the role in-basket for their role, as shown in Figure 7-10 on page 223.

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Figure 7-10 Selecting the in-basket properties

4. Set up the following sort information for the properties: – Complaint Received Date: Select Sortable and set the sort order to Ascending. – Customer Rating: Select Sortable. – Complaint Category: Select Sortable. This configuration looks as shown in Figure 7-11.

Figure 7-11 Configuring the in-basket sort parameters

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5. Click Add Filter on the in-basket Filters tab. Select the following properties and the associated operators for your filters: – Case Number with operator is like. – Complaint Status with operator is equal. – Complaint Received Date with operator is less than. – Compliant Category with operator is equal. The result looks similar to Figure 7-12.

Figure 7-12 Adding filters for an in-basket

6. Click OK All to complete the in-basket configuration for the Contact Center role. 7. Repeat steps 1 - 6 for the other roles. Assign the properties, sort parameters, and filter as you did for the Contact Center role in-basket. See the Table 7-4 for the in-basket configuration.
Table 7-4 In-basket definition In-basket Complaints Columns Complaint Received Date (sortable, sort default), Customer Rating (sortable), Complaint Category (sortable), Case Number, Complaint Status, Customer Name, Customer Number Case Number Case Number Case Number Filter Complaint Category Equal, Complaint Receive Date Less than, Complaint Status Equals, Customer Name Like

Investigator Manager Specialist

N/A N/A N/A

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In-basket Billing Agent Specialist Sales Agent

Columns Case Number Case Number Case Number, Customer Name, Customer Address, Customer Telephone, Customer Email, Customer City, Customer Rating Complaint Received Date, Case Number, Complaint Status, Complaint Category, Customer Name, Customer Number, Customer Rating Case Number, Complaint Category, Complaint Description, Complaint Received Date, Complaint Status, Customer Name, Customer Number, Customer Rating, Customer Since, Part Number, Safety Check, Upsale Opportunity

Filter N/A N/A Customer Name Like, Case Number Equal

My Work (Common Personal in-basket)

N/A

My Work (Personal in-basket for Manager Role)

Case Number Equal, Customer Name Like, Complaint Received Date Less than

Tip: It is a good idea to click Save after you complete the roles configuration.

7.2.5 Setting up document types
For your solution, set up the necessary document types. For the Customer Complaints solution, a document type for customer correspondence is needed. To create the document type, complete the following steps: 1. Click the Document Types tab. 2. Click Add Document Type. 3. Enter the following document type information: – For name of the document type, enter Correspondence. – For description, enter the description, as shown in Figure 7-13 on page 226.

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Figure 7-13 Add a new document type

4. Add properties for this document type. For the sample solution, we use the properties that we created for the document type. Complete the following steps to add the properties: a. Click Add Property and select Existing. b. Click Case Number to assign the existing properties to the document type, as shown in Figure 7-14. c. Repeat these steps to add other properties that you want for the document type.

Figure 7-14 Adding an existing property to document type

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5. Click OK, then click OK All to complete the document property configuration. 6. Repeat these steps for the other document types. See Table 7-5 for the list of all document types and their properties.
Table 7-5 Customer Complaint solution document types Document type Correspondence Supporting Document Properties Case Number Case Number Description Documents that are sent to the customer to communicate the complaint status. Documents that are received from the customer to support customer complaints.

Tip: The properties for documents are significant to the document rather than the case. In this example, the case properties are used for illustrative purposes only.

7.3 Defining the case type
After you define the solution properties, roles, in-baskets, and document types, you can define the case type that uses the solution information. In this section, the follow tasks are described: Creating a case type Configuring case type properties Configuring the Case Summary view Configuring custom properties layout view Configuring the case search Defining case folders structure

7.3.1 Creating a case type
To set up the Complaint case type, complete the following steps: 1. Click the Case Types tab. 2. Click Add Case Type, as shown in Figure 7-15 on page 228.

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Figure 7-15 Creating case type

3. The Case Type configuration page is shown in Figure 7-16. You can configure various options for the case type.

Figure 7-16 Configuring the case type

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As shown in Figure 7-16 on page 228, the configuration options for the case type include configuring the document type so that it adds a case when the document is created. You also also change the default page so it displays the add case, split case, and case details web pages. Because you are creating cases manually for this solution and the default pages are used, leave these options unchanged. 4. Select Enable case workers to create custom tasks to allow case workers to define custom task flows in run time.

7.3.2 Configuring case type properties
A case contains multiple properties that are needed to help knowledge workers to complete various tasks for the case. After the configuration options are set up for the case type, you add properties that are needed for the case type. Complete the following steps to add properties to the case type: 1. For the created case type, select Properties in the left pane to configure which properties are available within the case. 2. Add all of the properties that were defined to the case by clicking Add Property  Existing  Select all  OK, as shown in Figure 7-17. 3. Click OK All.

Figure 7-17 Configuring the case properties

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7.3.3 Configuring the Case Summary view
To work on a case, there are multiple views that are associated with the case where knowledge workers use to perform their work. The main view is the Case Summary view. Complete the following steps to configure the Case Summary view: 1. In the left pane, select the Views option as shown in Figure 7-18. From this window, you can go to the Case Summary tab, Properties Layout tab, and Case Search tab to configure various views that are used for the case type. 2. From the Case Summary tab, add the properties from the Available Properties field to the right field so that they appear in the Case Summary View, as shown in Figure 7-18.

Figure 7-18 Adding properties that appear in the Case Summary view

Tip: To the right side of each of the properties in the Available Properties field is an arrow. Clicking that arrow to move the property into the Properties in the Case Summary view field and back. The order that the properties are displayed in the view is the order that they are displayed in this field. The properties can be moved up or down by clicking the Move Up or Move Down icons to the right of the property name.

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7.3.4 Configuring custom properties layout view
By using the Properties View Designer, you can define custom interfaces for data entry and presentation purposes. Here, we describe how to create a view with a customized layout of the properties that we created earlier. Complete the following steps to create the Customer Information view with the properties layout specified: 1. Click the Properties Layout tab. 2. Click Add View, enter Customer Information, and then click OK, as shown in Figure 7-19.

Figure 7-19 Creating a view

3. Click the Open Properties View Designer icon to the right of Customer Information view tittle, as shown in Figure 7-20.

Figure 7-20 Opening Properties View Designer

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4. Properties View Designer provides different containers for defining custom layouts. For this solution, we add a property list, title layout, tabbed layout, and multiple column layout containers into a custom view. For adding a container, drag it from the containers list palette on the left of property view designer to the canvas, as shown in Figure 7-21.

Figure 7-21 Containers list palette and canvas

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5. Drag the property list container to the canvas, as shown in Figure 7-22.

Figure 7-22 Adding property list container to custom layout

6. Drag the Customer Rating field into the property list container that was added in step 5. Properties palette is below the containers palette to the left of property view designer, as shown in Figure 7-23.

Figure 7-23 Adding Customer Rating property into property list container

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7. Change the settings for the Customer Rating property that was added in step 6. For our solution, we are changing the control type to Static text, as shown in Figure 7-24.

Figure 7-24 Changing settings to Customer Rating property

8. Following the same procedure that was used for adding the property list control, add a tabbed Layout container to the bottom of the canvas, as shown in Figure 7-25.

Figure 7-25 Adding tabbed layout container

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9. Assign a tab tittle in the settings section. Use Customer Information and Compliant Information for titles, as shown in Figure 7-26.

Figure 7-26 Tabbed layout titles

10.Select Customer Information Tab in the tabbed layout that was configured in step 9 and add a multiple column layout into it. 11.Drag the following properties to multiple column layout, as show in Figure 7-27 on page 236: – Left column: customer number, customer since, customer address, and customer state – Right Column: customer name, customer city, customer email, and customer telephone

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Figure 7-27 Adding customer address property to multiple column layout

The completed multiple column layout looks similar to the one that is shown in Figure 7-28.

Figure 7-28 Completed multiple column layout: Customer information

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12.Click the Compliant Information tab and add a property list container. Then, drag the following properties, as shown in Figure 7-29 on page 238: – – – – – Case Number Total Transaction Amount Complaint Received date Part Number Compliant Description

13.Add a titled container below the property list container that was added in step 12. Then, drag the following properties, as shown in Figure 7-29 on page 238: – – – – – – – Case Source Compliant Status Compliant Category Upgrade Category Safety Check Update Opportunity Valid

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Figure 7-29 Completed combined layout: Compliant information

14.Click Save at the upper right of the Properties View Designer window to save the changes, as shown in Figure 7-30.

Figure 7-30 Saving the custom properties view

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15.Assign the properties view that was defined as the default view for the solution (the case creation and case data widget use this default view), as shown in Figure 7-31.

Figure 7-31 Assigning custom layout as default view

Tip: By using IBM Case Manager 5.2, case designers can define custom properties layouts and assign them to the properties widget in Page section. This feature provides flexibility when data entry and display interfaces are defined.

7.3.5 Configuring the case search
Case workers frequently perform searches within a case to find specific information to perform a task. In this section, we describe how to define the properties that can be made available for the case workers who want to search for cases. Complete the following steps to define the properties that are available for case search: 1. Click the Case Search tab. 2. Configure the Case Search view by adding properties in the left column (Available Properties) to the right column (Properties in the Case Search view), as shown in Figure 7-32 on page 240.

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Figure 7-32 Case Search view configuration completed

When case worker perform searches, these property fields are available for them to perform the search.

7.3.6 Defining case folders structure
By defining a case folder structure, a case worker can access all related content through a folder hierarchy that is consistent with the business problem that is being solved. Complete the following steps to define a case folders structure: 1. In the left pane, select the Case Folders option to create folders for storing case objects. 2. Click Add Folder and enter Supporting Documents for the folder name, as shown in Figure 7-33 on page 241. Click OK.

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Figure 7-33 Case Folder configuration

3. Repeat step 3 for Supporting Documents. Remember: When you create a case, IBM Case Manager creates a subfolder structure for the case as specified by the “Case Folders” attributes in a case type definition. 4. Click Save.

7.4 Defining embedded rules
From IBM Case Manager 5.2, you can use the embedded rules feature. In this section, we describe how to define a table-based rule by using this new capability. In this chapter, we define only the rule. In Chapter 8, “Building a simple solution: Part 2” on page 267, we show you how to use the rule within a case task. We define the following business rules: By default, a customer’s rating is SILVER. This value is assigned by using the default value for the case property, Customer Rating. If the person is a customer for 5 - 10 years, the customer’s rating is GOLD. If the person is a customer for more than 10 years, the customer’s rating is DIAMOND. If the customer has more than 10,000 USD in transaction amount, the customer’s rating also is DIAMOND. Complete the following steps to define the embedded rules as a table-based rule for a customer’s rating: 1. Select the Rules page and click Add Rule.

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2. Enter the following rules information and click OK (as shown in Figure 7-34): – For rule name, type Customer Rating Table. – Select Table-based rule as the rule type.

Figure 7-34 Creating an embedded rule: Table-based rule

3. After the rule is created, open Rule Designer by clicking Rule Name or the Rule Designer icon to the right, as shown Figure 7-35.

Figure 7-35 Opening rules designer

4. Click each column header and assign the following names for each column that we use in the rule table, as shown in Figure 7-36: – Customer Since – Transaction Amount – Customer Rating

Figure 7-36 Naming Table Rule Columns

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5. Define the column condition for Customer Since. To do so, right-click the column header and select Define Column, as shown in Figure 7-37. The Condition Editor opens.

Figure 7-37 Defining condition for customer since column

6. The Condition editor features interactive help to support rule authoring. Press the spacebar to show the list of available fields and scroll down to find “the Customer Since of” field, as shown in Figure 7-38.

Figure 7-38 List of case fields in condition editor

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7. Click and then select Compliant from the list, as shown in Figure 7-39.

Figure 7-39 Defining field and case type to be evaluated in condition

8. To complete the column condition, press the spacebar and select is more than from the list, as shown in Figure 7-40.

Figure 7-40 Defining condition value

Tip: The column condition that we defined affects every cell for this column; however, you can override the condition for a specific cell if required.

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9. Complete the following steps to define condition values for the Customer Since column: a. Add a condition for customers with 10 years or more by entering 10 in the first column cell. b. In the next cell that is below the cell that was defined in the previous step, define a custom value of 5 - 10 years. To do so, right-click the column cell and select Edit Custom Value, then write the custom value as shown in Figure 7-41.

Figure 7-41 Defining a custom value for cell

The completed the Customer Since column can look as shown in Figure 7-42.

Figure 7-42 Complete customer since column

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10.Following the same procedure for defining the Customer Since column, edit the Custom Values, and define a custom value in the third row for the Transaction Amount Column, as shown in Figure 7-43.

Figure 7-43 Define custom value for transaction amount

11.For the Customer Rating column, you set the values for this field when the other columns values (Customer Since and Transaction Amount) are met, as shown in Figure 7-44.

Figure 7-44 Setting value to customer rating field

12.Click Save in the upper right of the pane.

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The completed Customer Rating Table looks as shown in Figure 7-45.

Figure 7-45 Complete customer rating rule table

7.5 Defining case tasks
The following steps describe how to create the tasks that are required by the Customer Complaints solution. Table 7-6 lists all of the tasks for the Customer Complaints solution with the attributes that are associated with each task.
Table 7-6 Customer Complaint solution tasks Task Upsell Opportunity Upgrade Product Upgrade Plan Attributes Required, Automatic, Container, Property precondition Required, Automatic, Exclusive, Property precondition Required, Automatic, Exclusive, Property precondition Required, Automatic Optional, Automatic, Filing, Property preconditions Required, Automatic, Repeatable, Property update precondition Description This container task starts the subtasks that are contained in it when there is a possibility of an upsell opportunity. This task starts automatically when there is a product-related upsell opportunity. This task starts automatically when there is a non-product related upsell opportunity. This task starts automatically when there is an upsell opportunity. This task starts automatically when a customer submits a supporting document for billing-related complaints. This task starts automatically and is repeated when the complaint category property is changed.

Call Customer Verify Billing

Verify Complaint

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Task Review Product Complaint Review Non-Product Complaint Investigate Product Safety Send Correspondin g Letter

Attributes Optional, Automatic, Property precondition Optional, Automatic, Property precondition Optional, Manual, Property precondition Required, Automatic, Document Filing, and Property preconditions

Description This task starts automatically when a property condition is met to handle all product complaints. This task starts automatically when a property condition is met to handle all non-product complaints. This task can be started at anytime to perform a product safety investigation. This task starts automatically when a case worker files a corresponding letter into a case. After the letter is reviewed, it is sent to the customer through a third-party letter generation software. This task starts manually when a complaint must be closed. This discretionary task can be started one or more times to investigate one or more employees. This discretionary task can be started one or more times to request help to handle the complaint.

Close Complaint Investigate Employee Request Assistance

Required, Manual Discretionary

Discretionary

7.5.1 Creating Upgrade Options set
You must create a task set to make two tasks mutually exclusive. To create a task set, complete the following steps: 1. In the left pane, select the Tasks option. 2. Click Manage Sets. 3. Click Add Set and enter Upgrade Options as the name of the managed set.

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4. Select A mutually exclusive set and click OK to complete the creation of the Complaint Type set, as shown in Figure 7-46.

Figure 7-46 Creating a managed task set

5. Click OK at the bottom of the Manage Sets window to close the window. The set is associated with tasks later in this procedure.

7.5.2 Creating the Upsell Opportunity container task
The Call Customer, Upgrade Product, and Upgrade Plan tasks must be completed when there is an opportunity for the company to upsell its product or plan to the customer. These tasks can be grouped into a new container task that is started when there is an upsell opportunity.

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To create a container task for Upsell Opportunity, complete the following steps: 1. On the Tasks page, click Add Task. 2. Select Container task, as shown in Figure 7-47.

Figure 7-47 Creating the Container task menu option

3. On the General tab, complete the following steps to configure the task attributes: a. Select Upsell Opportunity as the task name. b. Select Task Starts: Automatically. c. Leave the Required option cleared because this task is an optional task.

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4. On the Preconditions tab, complete the following steps to configure the preconditions for the task, as shown in Figure 7-48: a. Select A property condition is met. b. Click Add condition to configure the first condition: • • For Property, select Upsale Opportunity For Operator, select =

Figure 7-48 Configuring the Upsell Opportunity precondition

5. For Value, select True. 6. Click OK.

7.5.3 Creating the Upgrade Product task
The Upgrade Product task belongs to the previously defined set Upgrade Options. After it is created, this task must be moved as a subtask under the Upsell Opportunity container task. Complete the following steps to create this task and move it into the container: 1. On the Tasks page, click Add Task 2. Select Task, as shown in Figure 7-49 on page 252.

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Figure 7-49 Creating Upgrade Product task

3. On the General tab, complete the following steps to configure the task attributes: a. Select Task Starts: Automatically. b. Select Upgrade Options from the Assign to set field. c. Select the Required option for this task. The results are shown in Figure 7-50.

Figure 7-50 Creating Upgrade Product task: General tab

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4. On the Preconditions tab, complete the following steps to configure the preconditions for the task, as shown in Figure 7-51: a. Select A property condition is met. b. Click Add condition to configure the first condition: • • • • • • For Property, select Upsale Opportunity For Operator, select = For Value, select True For Property, select Upgrade Category For Operator, select = For Value, select Product

c. Click Add condition to configure the next condition:

d. Click OK.

Figure 7-51 Preconditions for Upgrade Product Task

5. Click Move task, as shown in Figure 7-52.

Figure 7-52 Moving the Upgrade Product task option

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6. Select Upsell Opportunity as the target container task and then click OK, as shown in Figure 7-53.

Figure 7-53 Moving the Upgrade Product task to a container task

7. You can see the task moved to the container by clicking Go to subtasks of Upsell Opportunity, as shown in Figure 7-54.

Figure 7-54 Opening the subtasks of Upsell Opportunity

7.5.4 Creating the Upgrade Plan task
Similar to the Upgrade Product task, the Upgrade Plan task is a subtask of the Upsell Opportunity container task. It has property preconditions and belongs to Upgrade Options set. Use the same procedure that is described in 7.5.3, “Creating the Upgrade Product task” on page 251 to configure the Upgrade Plan task. The preconditions for the Upgrade Plan task are shown in Figure 7-55 on page 255.

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Figure 7-55 Upgrade Plan task preconditions

7.5.5 Creating the Call Customer task
Similar to the Upgrade Product task and Upgrade Plan tasks, Call Customer is a subtask of the Upsell Opportunity container task. However, it has no property preconditions and does not belong to any set. Use the same procedure that is described in 7.5.3, “Creating the Upgrade Product task” on page 251 to configure the Call Customer task. At this stage, the Upsell Opportunity container task contains the subtasks that are shown in Figure 7-56.

Figure 7-56 Subtasks of Upsell Opportunity

7.5.6 Creating the Verify Billing task
As shown in Table 7-6 on page 247, the Verify Billing is an optional task. It automatically starts when a Supporting document is filed into a case. Complete the following steps to create the Verify Billing task: 1. On the Tasks page, click Add Task. 2. Select Task, as shown in Figure 7-57 on page 256.

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Figure 7-57 Creating Verify Billing Task

3. On the General tab, enter Verify Billing as the name, select Task Starts: Automatically and Optional. 4. On the Preconditions tab, complete the following steps to configure the task preconditions: a. Select A document is added to the case. b. Select Document of a type defined for this case and Supporting Document from the menu for the document type. c. Add the following preconditions: • • Valid = True Complaint Category = Billing

d. Click OK.

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The preconditions are shown in Figure 7-58.

Figure 7-58 Configuring the Verify Billing task preconditions

7.5.7 Creating the Verify Complaint task
As shown in Table 7-6 on page 247, the Verify Complaint is an optional task. It automatically starts when the Complaint Category property is updated. Complete the following steps to create the Verify Complaint task: 1. On the Tasks page, click Add Task and then select Task. 2. On the General tab, enter Verify Complaint as the name and select Task Starts: Automatically and Required. 3. On the Preconditions tab, complete the following steps to configure the task preconditions: a. b. c. d. Select A case property is updated. Select Complaint Category from the menu for case properties list. Select Task is repeatable. Click OK.

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The preconditions are shown in Figure 7-59.

Figure 7-59 Configuring the Verify Complaint task preconditions

7.5.8 Creating the remaining tasks
Table 7-6 on page 247 shows a list of other tasks that must be created for the solution. This section describes how to create them based on the configuration and precondition windows that are provided for each task. This section describes the creation of the following tasks: Review Product Complaint Review Non-Product Complaint Investigate Product Safety Send Corresponding Letter Close Complaint Investigate Employee Request Assistance

Creating the Review Product Complaint task
As shown in Table 7-6 on page 247, the Review Product Complaint task is an optional task that automatically starts when a valid product-related complaint is received. Create the Review Product Complaint task with the configuration that is shown in Figure 7-60 on page 259. Make sure that you select Task Starts: Automatically and leave the Required option cleared because this is an optional task.

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Figure 7-60 Creating Review Product Complaint

Configure the precondition as shown in Figure 7-61.

Figure 7-61 Configuring Review Product Complaint task preconditions

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Creating the Review Non-Product Complaint task
The Review Non-Product Complaint task is similar to the Review Product Complaint task. Use the same procedure that is described in “Creating the Review Product Complaint task” on page 258. The preconditions for the “Review Non-Product Complaint” task are shown in Figure 7-62.

Figure 7-62 Configuring Review Non-Product Complaint task preconditions

Creating the Investigate Product Safety task
The Investigate Product Safety task is an optional task that can be started manually by a case worker. The task is created when the value of the Valid property is equal to true and the value of the Complaint Category property is equal to Product. Add the task with the configuration as shown in Figure 7-63 on page 261. Make sure to select the Task Starts: Manually option and leave the Required option cleared to make it an optional task.

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Figure 7-63 Configuring the General tab for Investigate Product Safety

Set the Preconditions for the Investigate Product Safety task as shown in Figure 7-64.

Figure 7-64 Configuring the Investigate Product Safety preconditions

Creating the Send Corresponding Letter task
As shown in Table 7-6 on page 247, the Send Corresponding Letter task is a required task. It automatically starts when a Correspondence document is filed into a case.

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Create the task with the configuration that is shown in Figure 7-65. Make sure to select the Task Starts: Automatically and Required options.

Figure 7-65 Configuring the general tab for Send Corresponding Letter

For precondition setup, see Figure 7-66.

Figure 7-66 Configuring Send Correspondence Letter task preconditions

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Creating the Close Complaint task
The Close Complaint task is a required task that can be started manually by a case worker and does not feature any preconditions. Add the task with the configuration that is shown in Figure 7-67.

Figure 7-67 Configuring the Close Complaint task

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Creating the Investigate Employee task
As shown in Table 7-6 on page 247, the Investigate Employee task is a discretionary task. A case worker can create this task at any time during a case processing. Add the task with the configuration as shown in Figure 7-68. Make sure that the Discretionally option is selected for the “This task starts” field.

Figure 7-68 Configuring the general tab for Send Corresponding Letter

Creating the Request Assistance task
The Request Assistance task is another discretionary task. Add the task with the configuration as shown in Figure 7-69 on page 265.

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Figure 7-69 Configuring the general tab for Request Assistance

7.5.9 Reviewing task summary
After you edit the attributes for all of the tasks, the simple Customer Complaints solution features required tasks, optional tasks, and discretionary tasks. Figure 7-70 shows all of the required tasks for the Customer Complaints solution.

Figure 7-70 Required tasks for the Customer Complaints solution

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Figure 7-71 shows all of the optional tasks for the Customer Complaints solution.

Figure 7-71 Optional tasks for the Customer Complaints solution

Figure 7-72 shows all of the discretionary tasks for the simple Customer Complaints solution.

Figure 7-72 Discretionary tasks for the Customer Complaints solutions

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Chapter 8.

Building a simple solution: Part 2
This chapter and Chapter 7, “Building a simple solution: Part 1” on page 211 describe how to build a simple solution. The use case that was introduced in Chapter 2, “Typical case management applications” on page 23 is used to provide step-by-step procedures to build the solution. Chapter 7, “Building a simple solution: Part 1” on page 211 and this chapter show how to build a simple case. Later chapters in this book build on this use case to show how to implement more advanced features into the solution. This chapter includes the following sections: Configuring workflow diagrams by using Step Designer Saving and validating the solution Deploying the Customer Complaints solution Testing the Customer Complaints solution Improving the solution

© Copyright IBM Corp. 2013, 2014. All rights reserved.

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8.1 Configuring workflow diagrams by using Step Designer
In this section, we show how to use the Case Manager Builder Step Designer to create the workflow diagrams for the tasks that are listed in Table 7-6 on page 247: Upgrade Product task Upgrade Plan task Call Customer task Verify Billing task Verify Complaint task Review Product Complaint task Review Non-Product Complaint task Investigate Product Safety task Send Corresponding Letter task Close Complaint task Investigate Employee task Request Assistance task

8.1.1 Creating the Upgrade Product task diagram
To create a workflow diagram for the Upgrade Product task, complete the following steps: 1. Click the Go to subtasks icon on Upsell Opportunity container task. 2. Click the Edit steps icon to the right of the Upgrade Product task, which is below the Edit Task icon, as shown in Figure 8-1.

Figure 8-1 The Open Step Editor (Edit steps) icon

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3. The Step Designer interface opens, as shown in Figure 8-2. The Step Designer window consists of horizontal sections that are known as swimlanes. Other than the System swimlane, each new swimlane represents a user role or workflow group. Steps are added to the swimlanes and the work is routed between the steps by connectors. Troubleshooting: If the swimlanes are missing when you open the Step Editor, ensure that the current version of your browser is supported by IBM Case Manager.

Figure 8-2 Using the Step Editor to design the Upgrade Product workflow task

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4. Click the Role Lane icon in the upper left of the Step Editor and drag it onto the unused white space in the workflow pane. A role swimlane is added, as shown in Figure 8-3.

Figure 8-3 Adding a role swimlane

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5. The Step Editor assigns the default role to the new swimlane. To select a different role, complete the following steps: a. In the left pane, under Role Property, select the role from the Role drop-down menu. For this Customer Complaints solution, select Sales Agent, as shown in Figure 8-4.

Figure 8-4 Selecting the role for a swimlane

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6. Drag a Step icon onto the Sales Agent swimlane. The result is shown in Figure 8-5.

Figure 8-5 Adding a step to the swimlane

7. In the Step Properties pane (on the left), enter Communicate Upgrade Options in the Name field. This process sets the step name. 8. Click the Edit icon to the right of the Case Properties field. 9. On the Case Properties tab, click Select Property.

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10.Click Select all to choose all of the case properties as the step parameters, as shown in Figure 8-6. Click OK.

Figure 8-6 Editing step properties

Remember: This example maps all of the case properties to data fields in the task (workflow). However, only those fields that are required by the task must be mapped.

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11.Click the Connector tool, as shown in Figure 8-7. Drag the LaunchStep to the center of the Communicate Upgrade Options step to connect the two steps.

Figure 8-7 Selecting the connector icon

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The Case Manager Builder Step Designer uses an elastic band effect when you connect the icons. The graphic then becomes a series of curves that connect the two steps, as seen in Figure 8-8.

Figure 8-8 Connecting the two steps

12.Click the Validate icon to apply your changes and validate the task. If there are validation errors, they are displayed in the lower left on the task. 13.Click Save and then Close to complete editing of the task workflow. 14.Click Save and Close to save and close the solution. Tip: Save and Close the solution often to save the solution artifacts in the design object store.

8.1.2 Creating the Upgrade Plan task diagram
Use the same procedure that is described in 8.1.1, “Creating the Upgrade Product task diagram” on page 268 to create the following task diagram for the Upgrade Plan task: 1. Select Sales Agent for the swimlane role. 2. Enter Communicate Plan Upgrade Options for the step name.

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3. Select all case properties as the step parameters. Figure 8-9 shows the task diagram for the Upgrade Plan task.

Figure 8-9 Upgrade Plan task diagram

8.1.3 Creating the Call Customer task diagram
Use the same procedure that is described in 8.1.1, “Creating the Upgrade Product task diagram” on page 268 to create the following task diagram for the Call Customer task: 1. Select Sales Agent for the swimlane role. 2. Enter Call Customer for the step name.

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3. Select all case properties as the step parameter Figure 8-10 shows the task diagram for the Call Customer task.

Figure 8-10 Call Customer task diagram

8.1.4 Creating the Verify Billing task diagram
Use the same procedure that is described in 8.1.1, “Creating the Upgrade Product task diagram” on page 268 to create the following task diagram for the Verify BIlling task: 1. Open the solution for editing. 2. On the Case Type tab, start the Step Editor for this task. 3. Select Billing Agent for the swimlane role. 4. Enter Verify Supporting Doc for the step name.

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5. In the Step Properties pane, click Responses. Add Valid Billing and Invalid Billing as the responses for Verify Supporting Doc step, as shown in Figure 8-11. Click OK.

Figure 8-11 Adding response to a step

6. Select all case properties as the step parameters and click OK. 7. Drag the connector from the Launch Step to the Verify Complaint step. 8. Create another Billing Adjustment step in the Billing Agent swimlane. 9. Drag the connector from the Verify Supporting Doc to the Billing Adjustment.

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10.Click the connector and select Valid Billing as the response from the Connector Properties pane, as shown in Figure 8-12.

Figure 8-12 Select a response for a connector

11.Create Contact Center swimlane and add the Send Correspondence step to it.

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12.Connect Verify Supporting Doc and Send Correspondence, and set the response to Invalid Billing. The final task diagram for Verify Billing task is shown in Figure 8-13.

Figure 8-13 Verify Billing task diagram

13.Validate, save, and close.

8.1.5 Creating the Verify Complaint task diagram
Use the same procedure that is described in 8.1.1, “Creating the Upgrade Product task diagram” on page 268 to create the following task diagram for the Verify Complaint task: 1. Open the solution for editing. 2. On the Case Type tab, start the Step Editor for this task. 3. Select Contact Center for the swimlane role. 4. Enter Verify for the step name. 5. Select all case properties as the step parameters and click OK.

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6. Add a Rule Step into the System swimlane. 7. Enter Customer Rating for the rule step name. 8. Select Customer Rating Table for the rule name. 9. Drag the connector from the Launch Step to the Customer Rating step, and from the Customer Rating step to the Verify Complaint step. 10.Validate, save, and close. Figure 8-14 shows the task diagram for the Verify Complaint task.

Figure 8-14 Verify Complaint task diagram

8.1.6 Creating the Review Product Complaint task diagram
Use the same procedure that is described in 8.1.1, “Creating the Upgrade Product task diagram” on page 268 to create the following task diagram for the Review Product Complaint task: 1. Select Specialist for the swimlane role. 2. Enter Review Product Complaint for the step name. 3. Select all case properties as the step parameters.

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Figure 8-15 shows the task diagram for Review Product Complaint task.

Figure 8-15 Review Product Complaint task diagram

8.1.7 Creating the Review Non-Product Complaint task diagram
Use the same procedure that is described in 8.1.1, “Creating the Upgrade Product task diagram” on page 268 to create the following task diagram for the Review Non-Product Complaint task: 1. Select Specialist for the swimlane role. 2. Enter Review Non-Product Complaint for the step name. 3. Select all case properties as the step parameters.

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Figure 8-16 shows the task diagram for Review Non-Product Complaint task.

Figure 8-16 Review Non-Product Complaint task diagram

8.1.8 Creating the Investigate Product Safety task diagram
Use the same procedure that is described in 8.1.1, “Creating the Upgrade Product task diagram” on page 268 to create the following task diagram for the Investigate Product Safety task: Select Investigator for the swimlane role. Enter Investigate Product Safety for the step name. Select all case properties as the step parameters. Change the access attribute to Read only for the following properties: – – – – – Customer Telephone Customer Email Customer State Customer Rating Customer Number

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– – – – –

Customer Name Customer City Complaint Received Date Case Number Customer Address

The changed properties are shown in Figure 8-17.

Figure 8-17 Access attribute for the case properties in a step

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Figure 8-18 shows the task diagram for the Investigate Product Safety task.

Figure 8-18 Investigate Product Safety task diagram

8.1.9 Creating the Send Corresponding Letter task diagram
This task is started when a document of type Correspondence is filed in the case. The document must be attached to the task workflow. Complete the following steps to create the Send Corresponding Letter task diagram: 1. Complete the following steps to create the attachment that starts the task as a property in the workflow: a. Start the Step Builder for the Send Corresponding Letter task. b. Click Manage Attachments at the top of the Step Editor. c. Click Add Attachment. d. In the Attachment Name field, enter CorrespondingLetter. Do not include any spaces because Content Platform Engine does not allow spaces in attachment name.

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e. In the Prompt field, enter Corresponding Letter. Unlike the Attachment Name, the Prompt field can have spaces. It represents the display name for an attachment. f. Click OK. g. Select CorrespondingLetter from the Initiating Attachment field and click Close, as shown in Figure 8-19. This process sets the CorrespondingLetter attachment as a starting attachment for the task workflow.

Figure 8-19 Creating the attachment so that it is available as a parameter to the step

2. Use the procedure that is described in 8.1.1, “Creating the Upgrade Product task diagram” on page 268 to add a swimlane role and step and edit the following step properties: a. Select Contact Center for the swimlane role. b. Enter Review Corresponding Letter for the step name.

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c. Select all case properties. Select Read only for all the case properties that were added as step parameters, as shown in Figure 8-20.

Figure 8-20 Adding case properties to the step in Read only mode

3. In the Step Properties pane, click the Edit icon to the right of the Attachments field.

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4. Click Select Attachment  CorrespondingLetter, as shown in Figure 8-21. Click OK to accept the selection.

Figure 8-21 Selecting an attachment for a step

5. Click OK to finish selecting attachments. 6. Draw the connector from the Launch Step to the Review Corresponding Letter step.

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Figure 8-22 shows the task diagram for the Send Corresponding Letter task.

Figure 8-22 Send Corresponding Letter task diagram

The Send Corresponding Letter task also can contain a step that generates a customer letter. This step uses a third-party tool to generate the letter to be sent to the customer.

8.1.10 Creating the Close Complaint task diagram
Use the same procedure that is described in 8.1.1, “Creating the Upgrade Product task diagram” on page 268 to create the following task diagram for the Close Complaint task: 1. Select Specialist for the swimlane role. 2. Enter Review and Close for the step name. 3. Select all case properties as the step parameters.

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Figure 8-23 shows the task diagram for Close Complaint task.

Figure 8-23 Close Complaint task diagram

8.1.11 Creating the Investigate Employee task diagram
The Investigate Employee task is a user-created task. When a case worker creates this task, Case Manager Client presents the case worker with the Launch Step page. The case worker can then enter the values for the properties and attachments. These values are used to start the task workflow data fields and attachments when the workflow is started. Complete the following steps to create the Investigate Employee task diagram: 1. Complete the following steps to define the attachments for the task workflow, as shown in Figure 8-24 on page 291: a. Click Manage Attachments at the top of the Step Editor. b. Click Add Attachment. c. In the Attachment Name field, enter CorrespondingLetters (no spaces allowed). d. In the Prompt field, enter Corresponding Letters. e. Click OK.

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f. Repeat these steps for the attachment SupportingDocuments. g. Click Close. Requirement: For a case worker to see the attachment when they are opening a work item, you must define the attachment by using Add Attachments. After you define it, use step properties to add the attachment to the step. The attachment must be created in each task that contains steps where the attachment is shown.

Figure 8-24 Defining attachments to use in the Investigate Employee task diagram

2. Update the step properties for the Launch Step by completing the following steps: a. Select Launch Step. b. In the Step Properties panel, click the Edit icon to the right of the Attachments field.

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c. Select CorrespondingLetters and SupportingDocuments from the Select Attachment menu, as shown in Figure 8-25. Click OK to accept the selection.

Figure 8-25 Adding attachments to the Launch Step

d. Click OK to finish adding attachments for the Launch Step. e. In the Step Properties panel, click the Edit icon to the right of the Case Properties field. f. On the Case Properties tab, click Select Property. g. Click Select all to choose all the case properties as the step parameters, and then click OK. h. In the Step Properties pane, click OK to save the changes for the Launch Step. 3. Create the following role swimlane and step by using the procedure that is described in 8.1.1, “Creating the Upgrade Product task diagram” on page 268: a. Select Manager for the swimlane role. b. Enter Investigate Employee for the step name. c. Select all case properties as the step parameters. d. Draw the connector from the Launch Step to the Investigate Employee step. Figure 8-26 on page 293 shows the task diagram for the Investigate Employee task.

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Figure 8-26 Investigate Employee task diagram

8.1.12 Creating the Request Assistance task diagram
The Request Assistance is another user-created task. Use the procedure that is described in 8.1.11, “Creating the Investigate Employee task diagram” on page 290 to configure the Launch step and create the following task diagram: 1. For attachments, select SupportingDocuments. 2. For first role swimlane, select Contact Center. 3. Complete the following steps for the step on the Contact Center: a. Enter Request Help as its step name. b. For the case properties, select all properties. c. For the attachment, select SupportingDocuments. 4. For the second role swimlane, select Specialist. 5. Complete the following steps for the step on the Specialist swimlane: a. Enter Process Request as its step name. b. For the case properties, select all properties. c. For the attachment, select SupportingDocuments.

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The Request Assistance task is shown in Figure 8-27.

Figure 8-27 Request Assistance task diagram

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8.2 Saving and validating the solution
To complete the solution, save and validate it by completing the following steps: 1. From the Case Type window, click Save, as shown in Figure 8-28.

Figure 8-28 Saving the tasks

2. Click Validate, as shown in Figure 8-29. Remember: This validation is for this Case type and its collection of Tasks only. This process does not validate the entire solution.

Figure 8-29 Validating the case type

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3. Click Save and Close to save the solution. The solution is now complete. After you build the solution, you must deploy it in an environment before you can use it.

8.3 Deploying the Customer Complaints solution
In the development environment, use Case Manager Builder to deploy the solution by completing the following steps: 1. On the Manage Solutions page, select the Customer Complaints solution. 2. Click Deploy, as shown in Figure 8-30.

Figure 8-30 Deploying the Customer Complaints solution

3. Click Deploy to confirm and commit changes that were made on the solution before deployment, as shown in Figure 8-31 on page 297.

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Figure 8-31 Deploy confirmation to commit changes

After the deployment is completed, Case Manager Builder displays the deployment status for the solution on the Manage Solutions page (a green rounded icon with a check mark). For the simple Customer Complaints solution, Case Manager Builder displays the successful deployment, as shown in Figure 8-32.

Figure 8-32 Successful deployment message

Troubleshooting: If the deployment is unsuccessful, check the deployment detail and deployment error logs from the More Actions menu, as shown in Figure 8-33 on page 298. The deployment might take some time to complete. The status bar shows the deployment status.

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Figure 8-33 Locating the deployment logs

8.4 Testing the Customer Complaints solution
The users Bill, Carl, Ian, Isabella, Mary, Steve, and Sally are used to create cases and process the work for the roles that are specified in the sample solution. Make sure to add these users to your LDAP server before you begin. If you cannot add these users to your LDAP server, replace them with the appropriate users from your LDAP. Requirement: Follow the guidelines in the “Planning for IBM Case Manager security” section in IBM Case Manager Information Center to give users access to the cases and tasks. After the successful deployment, test the solution by completing the following steps: 1. From Case Manager Builder, click Test for the Customer Complaints solution, as shown in Figure 8-34.

Figure 8-34 Testing the solution

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2. The first time the solution is tested, members must be assigned to the roles defined for the solution. After Case Manager Client displays the solution page, click Customer Complaints  Manage Roles (as shown in Figure 8-35) to assign users and groups to each role.

Figure 8-35 Select Manage Roles for the first time

The Manage Roles window is displayed for the solution, as shown in Figure 8-36. You must assign members to each role to test your solution. These members can be specific users or a group of users. Users and groups are defined and maintained on the LDAP provider that is configured for your IBM FileNet P8 Platform.

Figure 8-36 Manage Roles window

3. To add new members to a role, complete the following steps: a. Highlight a role from the Roles pane.

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b. Click Add Users and Groups. The Add Users and Groups window opens, as shown in Figure 8-37.

Figure 8-37 Add Users and Groups window for a role

c. Select the appropriate directory server to use from the Directory drop-down menu. d. Select the type of member to add (User or Group) from the Search for drop-down menu. e. Enter the name of the user or group (or the first characters) and click Search. A list of matching users (or groups) is listed in the Available panel. f. Select the members that you want to add from the Available panel and click the + icon to add the members to the role. g. Click Add to save the members for the role. 4. Complete the process in step 3 to add the following users to each role: – – – – – – For the Billing Agent role, add Bill. For the Contact Center role, add Carl. For the Investigator role, add Ian and Isabelle. For the Manager role, add Mary. For the Specialist role, add Steve. For the Sales Agent role, add Sally.

5. Log out of Case Manager Client. 6. Log in as Carl to create a case.

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Tip: If you use the same browser session as a different user login, clear the browser cache before you log in. 7. Click Add Case  Complaint, as shown in Figure 8-38.

Figure 8-38 Selecting the Complaint case type for add case

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Figure 8-39 shows the Add Case page for the Complaint case type.

Figure 8-39 Add Case window

8. Select Customer Information tab and enter the customer information, as shown in Figure 8-40.

Figure 8-40 Entering the customer information

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9. Enter the following information for Complaint Information and Flags: – – – – – – – Enter 9876 for Case Number. Enter 1,500 for Total Transaction Amount. Set today’s date for Complaint Received date. Set 548-8759 for Part Number. Set the Category to Product. Set Valid flag to true. Set Upsale Opportunity flag to true.

10.Click Add to add the case. 11.To see the newly created case, complete the following steps: a. b. c. d. Select the Cases tab. Enter 12345 (or enter % to search for all cases) for the Case Number. Click Search. Click the Title link to open the case.

12.After the case is opened, select the Tasks tab to display the status of the following tasks that are defined for this case type. Figure 8-41 on page 304 shows the task status for the selected case:

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Figure 8-41 List of tasks for a running case

– The Send Corresponding Letter task is in the Waiting state because it is waiting for a document of type Correspondence to be filed in the case. – The Upsell Opportunity container task is started automatically when the condition Upsale Opportunity = true is met. – The Call Customer subtask of the Upsell Opportunity container task is started automatically.

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– The Upgrade Plan subtask is disabled because it belongs to an exclusive set. The Upgrade Product subtask is already started when the preconditions Upsale Opportunity = true and Upgrade Category = Product are met. See Table 7-6 on page 247 for the list of exclusive tasks. – The Review Product Complaint task is started because the conditions Product Category = Product and Valid = true are met. – The Close Complaint task is created but not started because it is a manual task. Similarly, the Investigate Product Safety task is created but not started because it is a manual task. 13.Click Close to close the case view. 14.Select the Work tab. Because Carl is logged in, Carl cannot process the work item because there is no task that is associated to his role now. There are no work items that are displayed in his in-basket. 15.To process the work item, log out as Carl and log in back as Steve. Figure 8-42 shows the work item in the Specialist in-basket. Steve opens the work item in the Specialist in-basket, sets the Complaint Status to Processing, and completes the work.

Figure 8-42 In-basket for Specialist role

16.The case now has one completed task, as shown in Figure 8-43 on page 306.

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Figure 8-43 Current completed tasks

17.The Contact Center creates a letter to inform the customer of the case status in the Letter Templates folder and files it in the current case. File the document to the subfolder Correspondence of the case instance. To file the letter, complete the following steps: a. Click the Documents tab of Case Information. b. Double-click the Correspondence folder. c. Click Add  Add Document from Local System, as shown in Figure 8-44.

Figure 8-44 Selecting Add Document

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d. Click Browse to locate a document in your local workstation. e. By default, the Document Title is set to the name of the local document. You can change the Document Title of the document. f. For Class, select Correspondence. g. Enter the Case Number. h. Click Add to add the document to the case folder. Figure 8-45 shows the Add Document window.

Figure 8-45 Selecting a document of the correct document type

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18.The Send Corresponding Letter task is started automatically when a new document is filed into the case, as shown in Figure 8-46.

Figure 8-46 Send Corresponding Letter task started

19.Carl processes the work for the Send Corresponding Letter task. 20.Sally processes the work for the Call Customer and Upgrade Product tasks, which closes the possible upsell opportunity. Processing these two tasks completes the Upsell Opportunity task. 21.Steve reviews the case information, then sets the Complaint Status to Close. This step completes the work for the Close Complaint task.

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All of the required tasks for the current case are completed, as shown in Figure 8-47.

Figure 8-47 List of all completed tasks

8.5 Improving the solution
The example that is presented in this chapter and Chapter 7, “Building a simple solution: Part 1” on page 211 is a simple solution. Solution development often takes multiple iterations. The next iteration of solution development can improve the following areas: Solution icon Property choice list Solution properties Document properties In-basket properties

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It is beyond the scope of this book to provide detailed implementation steps for these areas. These potential improvements are described to showcase the improvements that you can build into the solution for future iterations.

8.5.1 Solution icon
The current default icon (as shown in Figure 8-48) might not depict the solution properly. You might want to change it to another icon by selecting one of the icons that are bundled with IBM Case Manager.

Figure 8-48 Current solution icon

8.5.2 Property choice list
Table 7-1 on page 218 lists the following case states: Open, Closed, Processing, Pending, and On-Hold. To produce a case status report for the number of invalid cases, you might want to have more choices, such as Invalid. By using this choice, you can differentiate between cases that are closed because the case workers resolve them, and those that the case workers determined were invalid.

8.5.3 Solution properties
You can manage the solution properties for the customer address better by breaking up the address into smaller pieces. Instead of Address, Customer City, and Customer State, you can have the properties Customer Street Address, Customer City, Customer State, and Customer ZIP Code. You can then construct the customer address by using these properties. Also, you might want to design the properties for the customer address to handle the format differences between nationalities.

8.5.4 Document properties
Currently, a document associates only with a single case property (the Case Number). To search for the documents with different attributes, such as the document’s received date and case priority, you must add more properties for the documents.

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8.5.5 In-basket properties
If you want to sort the in-basket by Customer Number and Case Number, you can modify the in-basket definition to sort by Customer Number and Case Number. Additionally, you can add filters to the In-basket definition to produce a subset of activities.

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Chapter 9.

Migrating and deploying solutions
After a solution is developed and tested, often it is necessary to migrate the solution from a development environment to a testing or production environment. This process can be involved, and can incorporate many tools and techniques. With IBM Case Manager, we can use different migration models, depending on the kind of asset that we want to migrate. This chapter describes the different migration models, starting with describing the advantages for each approach and suggesting how to combine the best of each one. This chapter includes the following sections: Migration models and migration procedure overview Migration and deployment procedure overview Preparation Migration Deployment Configuration

© Copyright IBM Corp. 2013, 2014. All rights reserved.

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9.1 Migration models and migration procedure overview
Multiple instances of IBM Case Manager that use distinct application server instances are deployed to create different environments to serve various purposes. The term environment in this chapter describes a collection of servers that often belong to a distinct IBM FileNet P8 domain that was created for one particular purpose. For example, you can have an environment for business analysts and solution developers to create a solution, an environment for developers to perform functional testing, and another testing environment for system integrators to test everything. Lastly, every company has a production environment on which the final tested solution is deployed for case workers to work on active and archived cases. In this section, we describe the differences between the traditional FileNet P8 application migration model and IBM Case Manager migration model and explain the advantages for using each one when assets are migrated between environments. For simplification of explanation, we use the following abbreviations: DEV: Development UAT: User acceptance, testing, and quality assurance PROD: Production

9.1.1 Traditional FileNet P8 application migration model
In this migration model, an application moves in stages through multiple environments. This movement is often expressed by using the following shorthand: DEV  UAT  PROD If an issue is found in the UAT environment, a correction to the application can be applied and tested directly in the UAT environment. After the user acceptance tests pass, the application often is migrated directly from the UAT environment to the PROD environment. The application modifications must then be separately replicated to the development environment to bring the development version of the application in sync with the version that was moved to the PROD environment. It is critical to have well-defined processes in place to ensure that application modifications are managed as a potentially bidirectional process between the environments. The stages are shown in Figure 9-1 on page 315.

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Figure 9-1 Traditional FileNet P8 application migration model

Although there are no strict requirements, the following requirements are accepted preferred practices for these environments: Development must not be done in the same environment as the production site. For the integrity of the test environment, it should be separate from development. Segregating these activities in different environments avoids the introduction of unwanted configuration changes or code changes by developers before those changes are ready to be tested. It also allows for verification of changes to be conducted in a clean environment by using documented procedures to ensure that the results are well-understood and repeatable. Similarly, segregating production from development and test avoids the introduction of unwanted changes before those changes are ready to be put into production. Highly advised is the use of the same LDAP foundation across all stages, except the development environment. This yields more reliable security testing and allows for scripts and procedures that are developed during testing to be used when the same changes are applied to production. For most FileNet P8 application development efforts (traditional and those supported by IBM Case Manager), the recommendation is to segregate the environments by the FileNet P8 domain. The isolation that is achieved by this approach is optimal to allow people to work simultaneously and independently on the same project but in different phases without adversely affecting each other. In particular, giving each environment its own FileNet P8 domain makes it easy to grant domain-wide permissions in each environment to different groups.

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For example, developers can be given full permission to configuration objects in the development environment, but no permission to configuration objects in the production environment.

9.1.2 IBM Case Manager solution migration model
The DEV, UAT, and PROD environments (as described in the previous section) and the other environments also exist with an IBM Case Manager system. The same recommendations for environment separation and other preferred practices apply. However, the migration model for an IBM Case Manager solution application differs in one important way from the traditional application migration model. To better control versions of the solution definition, the solution design tools (Case Manager Builder and FileNet Process Designer) are only available in the development environment. This configuration ensures that the solution, which is the core of the solution application, follows a well-controlled modification process. The solution definition is governed by using well-defined procedures with a “one source” approach. The development environment manages the solution definition and all other environments contain migrated versions that are deployed to, but not edited in, those other environments. Any issues that are found in UAT that require changes to the solution must be resolved and tested first in the development environment. Then, the solution is migrated and redeployed to the UAT environment for verification and further testing. Therefore, the solution moves through the environments in stages: DEV -> UAT, DEV -> PROD, as shown in Figure 9-2 on page 317.

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Figure 9-2 IBM Case Manager solution migration model

9.1.3 Using the best of both migration models
Some external factors can affect the overall solution application, but not affect the core solution definition. As those aspects are modified and tested in the UAT environment, the resulting configuration changes should be migrated directly from UAT to PROD to reduce the risk of unforeseen issues. Aspects not affecting the core and ideally managed without requiring solution redeployment include the following examples: Security model changes and LDAP differences Audit definition requirements Translation of assets to support localization The UAT environment can still be used to capture, potentially automate, and test the configuration steps that are required to support the solution. If the UAT environment for the IBM Case Manager system uses the same LDAP as the production environment. Then, as with the traditional application, the testing, solution application installation, and configuration documentation and any automation that is developed can be used directly when the solution is deployed into the production environment.

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Therefore, the solution and its supporting configurations can follow the following distinct migration paths: Solution definition: – DEV -> UAT – DEV -> PROD Security and Audit Definition Configurations DEV -> UAT -> PROD Localization DEV -> UAT -> PROD The core application migration path uses the IBM Case Manager solution migration model where all assets should treat the development environment as the “single source” for the solution application. Depending on the circumstances, some FileNet P8 assets might originate in the UAT or production environments. These assets include Content Platform Engine object store metadata (property templates, document classes, or choice lists) that exists in the enterprise that is reused when a new solution is designed. Another example is Content Platform Engine workflow system assets that are defined outside of IBM Case Manager that are incorporated into the solution, such as a workflow system configuration or component queue. Following the traditional application model, the definition of these assets might be modified in the UAT environment and then must be migrated back to development. Figure 9-3 on page 319 shows the migration paths.

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Figure 9-3 Advanced solution application migration

Incorporation of the traditional migration model for non-core aspects makes available experiences and configurations from the testing environments when the solution is migrated and deployed to the production environment. The more environments that must be maintained, the more important it is to produce a repeatable migration and deployment process to achieve the following goals: Save time Reduce errors Reduce risks Ensure similarity among environments Reproduce problems reliably for troubleshooting and resolution The outcome that is achieved by blending the traditional application migration model with the IBM Case Manager solution migration model can meet those goals by allowing a site to develop and automate a repeatable deployment process in UAT. This repeatable process can then be used when the solution is migrated and deployed into other environments, most especially production. The following key tasks can be completed: Capture and automate repeatable process for moving solution to PROD

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Write clear instructions for the entire process capturing the following important facts: – – – – Security credentials that are used and required Manual security changes Configuration tweaks needed and how the tweaks are applied Order in which assets must be migrated and deployed

Test deployment plan and instructions in UAT Figure 9-4 shows the overall migration and deployment process at a high level. This reflects migrating and deploying from a development environment to a non-development environment.

Figure 9-4 High-level process: Solution application migration DEV to UAT

9.2 Migration and deployment procedure overview
When you are migrating and deploying an IBM Case Manager solution application, you must consider the following different types of assets: IBM Case Manager assets: These assets include assets that were created in Case Manager Builder when the solution was designed.

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Other IBM FileNet P8 assets: These assets are created by using FileNet P8 tools, not managed by IBM Case Manager. Other IBM and external assets: These assets are developed outside of IBM Case Manager and FileNet P8 tools. The overall migration and deployment procedure includes the following overall steps: 1. Preparation: a. Preparing IBM Case Manager assets b. Preparing FileNet P8 assets c. Preparing other IBM assets and external artifacts 2. Migration: a. Migrating IBM Case Manager assets a. Migrating FileNet P8 assets a. Migrating other IBM and external artifacts 3. Deployment: a. Deploying IBM Case Manager assets b. Deploying FileNet P8 assets c. Deploying other IBM and external artifacts 4. Configuration: a. Configuring IBM Case Manager assets b. Configuring FileNet P8 assets c. Configuring other IBM and external artifacts For more information about migrating and deploying of these assets, see the IBM Case Manager 5.2 Solution Deployment Guide, which is available at this website: https://www.ibm.com/developerworks/community/blogs/e8206aad-10e2-4c49-b 00c-fee572815374/entry/ibm_case_manager_5_2_solution_deployment_guide This guide is divided into three parts and each part focuses on one of the three types of assets. The content of this chapter is based on the guide. However, we present the migration and deployment information in a sequential approach, following the logical order of steps you perform during a solution migration. You can use the procedure that is presented in this book as a checklist for your application migration and deployment process. For more information, always reference the guide. The rest of the chapters in this book follow the overall procedure that is outlined here for preparing, migrating, deploying, and configuring the solution.

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9.3 Preparation
This phase is focused on the identification and preparation of all assets for the migration process.

9.3.1 Preparing IBM Case Manager assets
When you are preparing IBM Case Manager assets, you must consider the various aspects that are associated with the following tasks: Identifying solution application artifacts and assets. Assembling migration and deployment instructions. Performing one-time configuration and setup tasks.

Identifying solution application artifacts and assets
During the solution design and development phase, it is important to create and maintain a solution package and supplemental material that represents a listing of all assets in the entire solution application. As a part of this, information to help the application migration and deployment process must be included. This documentation is needed during the deployment phase and for future tracking and change management purposes. When the solution application migration and deployment is documented, the following items must be noted: A description of the IBM Case Manager solution components. These consist of solution assets that are created during solution development by using the Case Manager Builder and administration client. Solution assets are listed in Table 9-1 on page 323. Any environment-specific references within the solution, such as a URL for the website widget or a stored search for the ContentList widget. These references must be mapped as a part of the solution migration. The solution roles and the LDAP users or groups that are required to associate with the roles.

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Table 9-1 lists the assets to consider during the preparation stage.
Table 9-1 IBM Case Manager assets Type Solution definition Defined by using Case Manager Builder Location Design Object Store (DOS) Migration tool Configuration tool/ administration client Configuration tool/ administration client Configuration tool/ administration client Configuration tool/ administration client Configuration tool/ administration client Administration client Administration client Deployment tool Configuration tool/ administration client Configuration tool/ administration client Configuration tool/ administration client Configuration tool/ administration client Configuration tool/ administration client Administration client Administration client

Process Engine configuration for solution Solution workflow collection Task workflows

Case Manager Builder, Process Designer Case Manager Builder, Process Designer Case Manager Builder, Process Designer Case Manager Builder

DOS

DOS

DOS

Pages, views, roles

DOS

Case instance security Case history, audit configuration

Case Manager administration client Case Manager administration client

DOS

DOS

Assembling migration and deployment instructions
A comprehensive set of tailored instructions should be written to document the process to follow when a solution application is migrated from the development environment to test or production environment. The document should include the required tasks, their order of execution, configuration details and options, and the roles (participants) that are involved in the processes with information about the required system privileges.

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Performing one-time configuration and setup tasks
After an application is migrated and deployed into a new system for the first time, other configuration steps are often required to be performed in the new environment. This also is true for an application that is built around IBM Case Manager. These other steps are referred to collectively as system configuration. At the application and solution level redeployment, system configuration information can be overwritten during the redeployment process and might need respecification. However, most configuration steps do not need repeating. These types of system configuration tasks and their procedures are specific to the solution and its environment. These procedures are not described in this chapter. However, in the next section of this chapter, we describe some one-time setup tasks that are required by the FileNet P8 tools that are used for migrating other FileNet P8 assets.

9.3.2 Preparing FileNet P8 assets
As you start to prepare for your migration of FileNet P8 assets, consider the following areas: Object identifier and dependencies Source and destination environment compatibility Identifying and documenting other solution application assets Performing one-time configuration and setup tasks

Object identifier and dependencies
When objects are moved between multiple environments, you must consider dependencies. Objects are often dependent on other objects in the object store, the workflow system, or on external resources, as shown in the following example: A workflow definition that contains references to attachments (document or folder). Those attachments must exist in the specified object store in the destination environment by the time the workflow definition is imported. An application’s stored search definition is an XML document in an object store. The XML content references object stores by name and ID. This type of dependency is automatically handled by FileNet Deployment Manager. A document references an external website that contains its content. This type of dependency must be maintained manually. The extra effort of maintaining the dependencies in the destination environment can be reduced by following the pattern of having stable GUIDs. Not following the stable GUID pattern might require more deployment logic.

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Source and destination environment compatibility
Part of preparing to migrate any FileNet based application between environments is ensuring the source and destination object stores are compatible. This process includes the following tasks: Ensuring add-ons, which define classes or properties in the destination object store (target environment) are the same as in the source object store (project area or target environment) Considering the release levels of the software and deployment tools that are used. Verifying all content to be deployed is checked in before the import process is started. Planning the corresponding administrative groups in the source and destination environments. Ensuring any services that are required by the solution application are available when the solution and associated other assets are deployed. Note: For more information, see the topic in IBM FileNet P8 5.2 Information Center, which is available at this website: http://pic.dhe.ibm.com/infocenter/p8docs/v5r2m0/topic/com.ibm.p8.com mon.deploy.doc/deploy_ce_import_concepts.htm

Identifying and documenting other solution application assets
As described in 9.3.1, “Preparing IBM Case Manager assets” on page 322, it is important to create and maintain a listing of all assets in the entire solution application during the solution design and development phase. Table 9-2 lists other FileNet P8 assets to be considered.
Table 9-2 Other FileNet P8 assets to be considered for solution deployment Type Reused Content Platform Engine classes and properties Defined by using Administration Console for Content Platform Engine Location Target object store Migration tool FileNet Deployment Manager Deployment tool FileNet Deployment Manager

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Type Reused queues and component queues

Defined by using Process Configuration Console

Location Target object store

Migration tool Process Configuration Console and FileNet Deployment Manager FileNet Deployment Manager

Deployment tool Process Configuration Console

Content Platform Engine marking sets Content Platform Engine event subscription Content Platform Engine code module Content Platform Engine event workflow definition IBM FileNet eForms for FileNet P8 form template IBM Forms form template

Administration Console for Content Platform Engine Administration Console for Content Platform Engine Administration Console for Content Platform Engine Process Designer

FileNet P8 domain

FileNet Deployment Manager

Target object store

FileNet Deployment Manager

FileNet Deployment Manager

Target object store

FileNet Deployment Manager

FileNet Deployment Manager

Target object store

FileNet Deployment Manager

FileNet Deployment Manager

IBM FileNet eForms for FileNet P8 designer IBM Forms Designer

Target object store

FileNet Deployment Manager FileNet Deployment Manager

FileNet Deployment Manager FileNet Deployment Manager

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Type Workplace FileNet Workplace XT or IBM Content Navigator search stored in the FileNet P8 repository Search templates

Defined by using Workplace FileNet Workplace XT or IBM Content Navigator

Location Target object store

Migration tool FileNet Deployment Manager

Deployment tool FileNet Deployment Manager

Search Designer

Target object store

FileNet Deployment Manager

FileNet Deployment Manager

Performing one-time configuration and setup tasks
After an application is migrated and deployed into a new system for the first time, the following tasks are often required to be performed in the new target environment: Create FileNet Deployment Manager deployment tree. If more than one FileNet Deployment Manager instance is used to perform the export, import, and deploy process, a deployment tree must be created for each FileNet Deployment Manager instance that is used. Create FileNet Deployment Manager environment. This task is used to create environments in FileNet Deployment Manager to enable the tool to connect to an Content Platform Engine environment.

9.3.3 Preparing other IBM assets and external artifacts
As described in 9.3.1, “Preparing IBM Case Manager assets” on page 322, during the solution design and development phase, it is import to create and maintain a listing of all assets in the entire solution application. Table 9-3 on page 328 summarizes other IBM and external artifacts to be considered.

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Table 9-3 Other IBM and external assets Solution asset IBM Content Manager item types Defined by using IBM Content Manager system administration client IBM Content Navigator Location IBM Content Manager library server Migration tool IBM Content Manager system administration client IBM Content Navigator administration tool Deployment tool IBM Content Manager system administration client IBM Content Navigator administration tool

IBM Content Navigator desktop IBM Operational Decision Manager rules project (formerly known as WebSphere ILOG® JRules BRMS) Reused IBM Business Process Manager processes IBM Content Analytics with Enterprise Search

IBM Content Navigator configuration database IBM Operational Decision Manager Decision Center

IBM Operational Decision Manager Rule Designer

IBM Business Process Manager Process Designer IBM Content Analytics with Enterprise Search administration console Process Task Manager Cognos Real-time Monitoring Workbench

Process center, Process server File

Process center administration tool IBM Content Analytics with Enterprise Search administration console Process Task Manager Cognos Real-time Monitoring Workbench

Process center administration tool IBM Content Analytics with Enterprise Search administration console Microsoft SQL Server OLAP Services

Case Analyzer

OLAP database Database for Cognos Real-time Monitoring

Cognos Real-time Monitoring

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Solution asset Custom widget

Defined by using External tool (example: Rational® Application Developer)

Location External tool

Migration tool External tool

Deployment tool IBM Case Manager configuration tool or administration client IBM Content Navigator administration tool Application Server's administration console External tool FileNet Deployment Manager

External Data Service Email templates that are checked in as documents

External tool

External tool Target object store

External tool

9.4 Migration
The migration phase consists of exporting the assets from the source environment, staging the solution definition in the destination staging object store, and preparing to import the remaining assets into the destination environment.

9.4.1 Migrating IBM Case Manager assets
By using information from the solution documentation, you prepare a solution package for migration. To ensure that a consistent version of the solution is packaged, freeze development activities for the solution to be migrated while the assets are exported.

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Note: The freeze is accomplished by coordination between the users in the development environment and the solution administrator who is performing the export. Project planning and procedures should include how such a freeze is communicated. Figure 9-5 shows migration from a non-development environment, such as a test environment, to another test environment where it can be tested, or the final production environment where the solution is used by case workers.

Figure 9-5 Overview of basic solution migration from UAT to PROD

As shown in Figure 9-5, the migration process from a final UAT system to the production system consists of the following steps: 1. Export the solution. To export the deployed and tested solution from the development environment, complete the following steps: a. Log in to the IBM Case Manager administration client by using the following URL: http:///navigator/?desktop=icmadmi n The following default URL is used when IBM WebSphere is used as the application server: http://:9080/navigator/?desktop=icmadmin

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For example, the default URL that is used when Oracle WebLogic is used as the application server is shown in the following example: http://:7001/navigator/?desktop=icmadmin b. Browse to the design object store for the development environment and open it by completing the following steps: i. Select the Solutions node in the navigation pane, as shown in Figure 9-6. ii. Select the wanted solution from the list on the right side. Use the Actions drop-down menu and choose Export  Solution.

Figure 9-6 Export IBM Case Manager solution

c. In the Name the solution package dialog box, enter the Solution package file name. Click Next. d. Verify that the information about the Review the solution package to export dialog box is correct. Click Finish to start the export process. e. Wait for the processing to complete and confirm that the solution package successfully exported. f. Click Download and Close to use your browser to download the solution package .zip file to a well-known location. 2. Export the security configuration manifest. If a security configuration was created, you can export the manifest that can be associated with the solution from the development or UAT environment. The security configuration can be applied to the imported solution after it is deployed. Before it is applied, the imported configuration can be edited to incorporate any changes that are required by the security model or LDAP for the destination environment.

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To export the security configuration manifest, complete the following steps: a. Log in to the IBM Case Manager administration client by using the following default URL: http:///navigator/?desktop=icmadmi n b. Open the wanted design (development environment) or staging (non-development) object store. c. Select the Solutions node in the navigation pane. d. Select the wanted solution from the list on the right side. Use the Actions drop-down menu and choose Export  Security Configuration, as shown in Figure 9-7.

Figure 9-7 Export security configuration

e. In the Name the package and select security manifests to export dialog box, enter the Configuration package file name. From Available manifests, select the security configuration manifest to export. Click Next, as show in Figure 9-8 on page 333.

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Figure 9-8 Exporting security configuration manifest

f. Verify that the information in the Name the security configuration dialog box is correct. Click Finish to start the export process. g. Wait for the processing to complete and confirm the configuration package successfully exported. h. Click Download and Close to use your browser to download the configuration package .zip file to a well-known location. 3. Import the solution. Use the IBM Case Manager administration client to import a solution package that was previously exported from another environment. The exported solution package includes all assets that were created for the solution in Case Manager Builder. Note: When a solution package or a deployment package is reimported, service data mappings that are submitted through the IBM Case Manager or FileNet Deployment Manager tools can appear not to be applied. This might happen when the package contains a document object asset where the service mapping applies to the content and that asset exists in the destination object store with the same ID. For more information about actions that can be taken if this occurs, see “Reimport of assets with content containing environment-specific references” in IBM Case Manager Information Center, which is available at this website: http://pic.dhe.ibm.com/infocenter/casemgmt/v5r2m0

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Complete the following steps to import the solution: a. Log in to the IBM Case Manager administration client by using the default URL: http:///navigator/?desktop=icmadmi n b. Open the wanted staging (non-development) object store. c. Click Solutions  Import  Import Solution to start the import solutions wizard, as shown in Figure 9-9.

Figure 9-9 Importing solution

d. In the Solution package file name field, enter or browse to the .zip file that contains the solution package to be imported. Click Next, as shown in Figure 9-10.

Figure 9-10 Select solution package to import

e. Review the information in the Review the solution package to import dialog box. Check the Replace existing solution option at the bottom of the dialog box so that the import updates the existing solution definition.

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Note: Not selecting this option results in an import error if the solution exists in the destination environment. f. Click Next. g. In the Map users and groups dialog box, click Search to select the user or group to map to values that are valid for this environment. h. Map all users and groups to users and groups that are valid in the destination environment LDAP. Users can be mapped to groups and multiple users or groups can be mapped to the same user or group (as shown in Figure 9-11). The information that is captured during the preparation phase helps with choosing the mappings.

Figure 9-11 Map users and groups

i. Click Finish and verify that the import completed successfully, as shown in Figure 9-12 on page 336.

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Figure 9-12 Verify solution import results

4. Import security configuration manifest. LDAP differences are managed by editing the security configuration after it is imported, but before it is applied to the deployed solution. The security configuration wizard indicates which security principles are invalid and must be corrected. For more information about the security configuration manifest import operation, see the IBM Case Manager topic “Importing the security configuration”, which is available at this website: http://pic.dhe.ibm.com/infocenter/casemgmt/v5r2m0/topic/com.ibm.case mgmt.design.doc/acmdc055.htm For a comprehensive description of the contents of the security configuration manifest and other concepts that are related to security, see the IBM Case Manager 5.2 Information Center topic “Security”, which is available at this website: http://pic.dhe.ibm.com/infocenter/casemgmt/v5r2m0/topic/com.ibm.case mgmt.design.doc/acmsc000.htm Complete the following steps to import the security configuration manifest: a. Log in to the IBM Case Manager administration client by using the following default URL: http:///navigator/?desktop=icmadmi n b. Open the wanted staging (non-development) object store. Click Solutions  Import  Import Security Configuration to start the import solutions wizard.

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c. In the Security configuration package file name field, enter or browse to the .zip file that contains the security configuration package to be imported, as shown in Figure 9-13. Click Next.

Figure 9-13 Import security configuration

d. Review the information in the Verify the selected security configuration information dialog box. Click Finish to start the import process, as shown in Figure 9-14.

Figure 9-14 Verify security configuration information

e. Verify that the security configuration was successfully imported. Click Close to close the wizard.

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5. Edit security configuration. As shown previously in this section, the scenario starts with a security configuration manifest that is migrated with the solution package as a part of the overall solution application package. However, the security configuration must be modified to reflect the LDAP for the destination environment. It is assumed that the proper users and groups are in the test or production LDAP before editing the security configuration. Complete the following steps to edit the security configuration: a. Log in to the IBM Case Manager administration client by using the following default URL: http:///navigator/?desktop=icmadmi n b. Open the wanted staging (non-development) object store. Select the Solutions node in the navigation pane. Select the wanted solution from the list on the right side. Use the Actions drop-down menu and choose Configure  Security, as shown in Figure 9-15.

Figure 9-15 Edit security configuration

c. Complete the following steps in the Create or edit a security configuration dialog box: i. Choose Edit a security configuration, as shown in Figure 9-16 on page 339. ii. From the list of security configuration manifests that are associated with this solution that appears at the bottom of the dialog box, select the security configuration manifest that was created or imported. iii. Click Next.

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Figure 9-16 Selecting security configuration to edit

d. Complete the following steps in the Name the security configuration dialog box: i. In the drop-down menu for the Target environment name, choose the target environment definition that contains the deployed solution to which the security configuration is applied, as shown in Figure 9-17.

Figure 9-17 Name the security configuration

ii. Click Next.

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e. Complete the following steps in the Modify permissions for roles dialog box: i. Review the specifications for case types, roles, and permissions that were created by the business analyst and solution developer in the source environment. These specifications often do not need to be modified, especially if the solution migration is between a test and production environment. ii. Click Next to proceed. f. Complete the following steps in the Define the administrators and assign privileges dialog box: i. Click Add to add the users and groups that administer the solution deployment. ii. Click Remove to remove the users and groups that should not be administrators for the deployed solution. Note: The Invalid column contains an indication of which users and groups are not valid for the destination target environment LDAP. These entries must be removed. At least one valid entry must be added to ensure that a user has the permissions that are needed to administer the solution. The following preferred practices are helpful: Add the user who is editing the security configuration manifest so that user can make further modifications after the security configuration is applied later. In this example, this user is ceadmin. Notice that the Remove button is disabled for this user so the entry cannot be removed after it is added. Add a group that holds all users that can act as solution administrators. Groups are easier to manage than lists of users that are added directly to the security configuration. iii. Click Save to save any changes. iv. Click Next.

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g. In the Associate users and groups with roles dialog box, review the specifications that were entered when the security configuration manifest was created or modified in the source for the destination environment, as shown in Figure 9-18. Complete the following steps to remove a group or user entry: i. Expand the wanted role. ii. Select the user or group entry to be removed. iii. Click Remove.

Figure 9-18 Remove user or group entry

Complete the following steps to add users and groups: i. Use Add to open the Associate users and groups to role dialog box. ii. Select the wanted users and groups to all the roles (see step h). h. Complete the following steps in the Associate users and groups to role dialog box, as shown in Figure 9-19 on page 342: i. Confirm that the wanted role appears in the Role drop-down menu. ii. Use the search icon to search for users or groups who are appropriate for this role. iii. Add the wanted users and groups from the result set. iv. Repeat these steps until all of the required users and groups for the particular role are selected.

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Figure 9-19 Associate users and groups to role

v. Click Add to confirm your choices. vi. When you return to the Associate users and groups with roles dialog box, expand the selected role to see your additions, as shown in Figure 9-20.

Figure 9-20 Verify users or groups association

vii. Click Save to save any changes. viii.Click Next to proceed. i. In the Apply the security configuration dialog box, click Save to confirm your choices, as shown in Figure 9-21 on page 343.

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Note: Do not select the Apply the security configuration option now. The security configuration is applied after the solution is deployed.

Figure 9-21 Apply security configuration changes

j. Close the Configure Security tab. Note: For more information about a complete scenario for this security configuration sample, see Part 1 of IBM Case Manager 5.2 Solution Deployment Guide, which is available at this website: https://www.ibm.com/developerworks/community/blogs/e8206aad-10e24c49-b00c-fee572815374/entry/ibm_case_manager_5_2_solution_deploy ment_guide

9.4.2 Migrating FileNet P8 assets
The process of migrating FileNet assets involves a series of tasks. This section describes the following tasks that must be performed: 1. Export FileNet workflow system configuration. Export the required Content Platform Engine Workflow System assets from the target object store in the project area of the development environment where the solution application was created and tested. Required Workflow System assets are those that were created with the Process Configuration Console or Process Designer when they were not started from Case Manager Builder or not in solution edit mode. 2. Export FileNet Content Manager assets. Export the required FileNet Content Manager assets from the target object store in the project area of the development environment where the solution application was created and the unit was tested.

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3. Create security principals half map. For a source half map, it is best to retrieve principal data from the deployment datasets that were created when the FileNet Content Manager assets were exported. This creates a relatively small source security principals half map that contains only the security principals that are referenced by the assets that were exported. 4. Create services half map. This task is optional, depending on the solution application design. A common example includes the IBM Forms form template that contains a web services reference that must be mapped to a valid value for the destination environment. Service information can be extracted from the following sources: – FileNet Content Manager deployment dataset that contains documents whose content can be processed by FileNet Deployment Manager to extract the service data. – FileNet workflow system configuration export file. – Service half map for the source FileNet Deployment Manager environment. 5. Create FileNet Deployment Manager deployment package. In FileNet Deployment Manager, a deployment package is a compressed file of deployable assets that FileNet Deployment Manager can use to migrate them into a different environment. 6. Extract FileNet Deployment Manager deployment package. Prepare the FileNet Deployment Manager instance on the destination environment: You often start this task by expanding the deployment package that was created during the export of the FileNet P8 assets, which contains the source environment half maps and the deployment datasets to be converted and imported. 7. Create security principals half map. In the source environment, the deployment dataset is used to filter the LDAP repository for the destination environment and avoid a time-consuming download when the LDAP population is large. For the destination environment, a deployment dataset is not available. Use the information that was gathered in the preparation phase regarding the security principals that are used for the destination environment to create a label file. Use this label file (in FileNet Deployment Manager) to filter the security principals that are retrieved from the LDAP information.

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8. Create services half map. To create the services half map for the destination environment, a short cut is available. Often, mapping services are done by editing host and port specifications in a set of URLs. The FileNet Deployment Manager services mapping mechanism allows for the direct editing of the services information to easily correct those values to reflect a new environment. 9. Create source-destination pair with data mappings. The source-destination pair identifies the source and destination environments to use for a specific deployment. The data that is gathered for the pair includes the wanted mappings between the environments for corresponding object stores, security principals, and services. 10.Convert deployment dataset by using mapping data. The convert operation uses the export deployment dataset and the data maps to convert the source objects with information that is specific to the destination environment. During the conversion process, errors can occur when unmapped entries are present in the deployment dataset that is converted. An unmapped entry is benign if it is not referenced in the exported data. 11.Generate change analysis report. Change Impact Analysis is an information-only operation that reports on but does not modify the destination environment. The report includes warnings and errors for potential import issues. It also includes sizing and other data that reflects the change impact analysis.

9.4.3 Migrating other IBM and external artifacts
The following samples of external assets can be considered in the migration process: Package custom widget Exported IBM Content Navigator desktop Note: For more information about a complete scenario for this security configuration sample, see Part 3 of IBM Case Manager 5.2 Solution Deployment Guide, which is available at this website: https://www.ibm.com/developerworks/community/blogs/e8206aad-10e2-4c4 9-b00c-fee572815374/entry/ibm_case_manager_5_2_solution_deployment_g uide

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9.5 Deployment
Deploying the solution creates the objects that are required for solution execution. The deployment procedures are explained in this section.

9.5.1 Deploying IBM Case Manager assets
The following tasks must be considered when you are deploying an IBM Case Manager solution: 1. Suspend and backup the system. Before any system modification, it is prudent to back up the portions of the system that is affected by the changes. For the best possible backup, activity on the system should be temporarily suspended. This allows a consistent snapshot of all of the related data to be captured. You must plan to suspend the system by using locally defined procedures. Include in your planning how the system and solution administrators access the system to perform the necessary solution deployment and system configuration tasks. For more information about backups, see “Backing up your system” in the IBM Case Manager Information Center, which is available at this website: http://pic.dhe.ibm.com/infocenter/casemgmt/v5r2m0/topic/com.ibm.case mgmt.design.doc/acmad003.htm 2. Deploy the solution. Deploy the imported solution to the wanted project area or target environment. You also must deploy more assets and import customization first. For more information, see the Checklist appendix in Part 1 of the deployment guide, then you can deploy the solution. If the destination environment is a development environment, the solution is deployed for testing by using the Case Manager Builder. The following procedures assume that the destination environment is a non-development environment, test or production, and the solution is deployed by using the IBM Case Manager administration client: a. Log in to the IBM Case Manager administration client by using the following default URL: http:///navigator/?desktop=icmadmi n b. Complete the following steps to open the wanted staging (non-development) object store: i. Select the Solutions node in the navigation pane.

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ii. Select the imported solution from the list on the right side. Use the Actions drop-down menu and click Deploy, as shown in Figure 9-22.

Figure 9-22 Deploy case solution

c. In the Target environment name drop-down menu in the Select the target object store dialog box, choose the target environment definition name for the target environment to which the solution is deployed. Click Next. d. In the Review the solution to deploy dialog box, verify the information and click Finish and then verify that deploy completed successfully, as shown in Figure 9-23.

Figure 9-23 Review deployed solution

e. Click View Log to save the log for later reference. It is recommended that you choose a file naming scheme and location so these logs can be used to retain a history of the changes that are applied to the system. Open and review the saved log to verify that the solution deployed as expected.

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Note: To quickly see all of the solutions that are deployed in the test or production environment, use the following Case Manager Solutions List link from the IBM Case Manager API deployment information URL, default value: http:///CaseManager/CASEREST/v1/info

9.5.2 Deploying FileNet P8 assets
The following tasks must be considered when FileNet P8 assets are deployed: 1. Import FileNet Content Manager assets. Use FileNet Deployment Manager to import assets that are contained in the expanded deployment package. Import options are used to ensure that a set of exported assets is consistent when imported. The following import options often are used when a solution application is migrated: – Import Object ID: This ensures that for an asset that is stored as a document (such as a form template or workflow attachment), the association to a specific document object version is retained. – Always Update vs. Update if newer: Because it is important for a solution application deployment to fully replicate the design from the source development environment, the use of the Always Update option is typical. However, if your business needs require that assets that are modified directly in the target environment take precedence over older changes from the IBM Case Manager development environment, you can select the Update if newer option. 2. Import FileNet workflow system assets. Import the required Content Platform Engine Workflow System assets into the target environment where the solution application is deployed.

9.5.3 Deploying other IBM and external artifacts
The following tasks must be considered when other IBM and external artifacts are deployed: Deploy and register widgets. For a custom widget to be deployed with an IBM Case Manager solution, the widget package must be registered with the IBM Case Manager server and registered as a plug-in with IBM Content Navigator server in the target environment. For more information, see 10.5.7, “Deploying the custom widget package” on page 400.

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Import desktop. An IBM Content Navigator desktop is created in the target environment.

9.6 Configuration
After a solution is migrated and deployed, more system configuration steps might be required (depending on the features of the solution). These configurations steps are described in this section.

9.6.1 Configuring IBM Case Manager assets
In this section, we describe only the following configurations that are managed by using the IBM Case Manager administration client: Security configuration Audit configuration Note: Other configurations outside of the IBM Case Manager administration client scope are described in the Part 2 of IBM Case Manager 5.2 Solution Deployment Guide, which is available at this website: https://www.ibm.com/developerworks/community/blogs/e8206aad-10e2-4c4 9-b00c-fee572815374/entry/ibm_case_manager_5_2_solution_deployment_g uide Complete the following steps to configure Case Manager assets: 1. Apply the security configuration. This task shows how an existing security configuration manifest that was created or edited to accommodate the requirements in the test or production environment is applied to the deployed solution. You start with a security configuration manifest that was migrated with the solution package as a part of the overall solution application package. Then, you modify the security configuration manifest to reflect the LDAP for the destination environment. Complete the following steps to apply the security configuration: a. Log in to the IBM Case Manager administration client by using the following default URL: http:///navigator/?desktop=icmadmi n

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b. Open the wanted staging (non-development) object store can complete the following steps: i. Select the Solutions node in the navigation pane. ii. Select the wanted solution from the list on the right side. iii. Click Actions  Configure  Security, as shown in Figure 9-24.

Figure 9-24 Apply Security Configuration

c. In the Create or edit a security configuration dialog box, click Edit a security configuration. From the list that appears at the bottom of the window, select the security configuration manifest that was created or imported and edited for this environment. Click Next. d. In the Name the security configuration dialog box, complete the following steps: i. In the drop-down menu for the Target environment name, choose the target environment definition that contains the deployed solution to which the security configuration is applied. ii. Click Next, as shown in Figure 9-25 on page 351.

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Figure 9-25 Choosing target environment to apply security configuration

e. For each subsequent dialog, review the information for accuracy, then click Next. Repeat this step until the Apply the security configuration dialog box opens. f. Making the following selections in the Apply the security configuration dialog box: • Apply the security configuration to ask the system to use the security configuration manifest to apply the security configuration to the deployed solution in the selected target environment. Apply the role membership to ask the wizard to configure the role memberships. This takes the place of the use of the Manage Roles operation in IBM Case Manager 5.2 Case Manager Client. Apply to all discretionary tasks to ask the wizard to apply the specified security to all discretionary tasks in the solution. Use this option often provides a starting point. Then, security is further refined manually by using ACCE to customize access to individual discretionary tasks.





Click the Apply button to start the process, Figure 9-26 on page 352.

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Figure 9-26 Apply security configuration

g. Verify that the process completes successfully, as shown in Figure 9-27.

Figure 9-27 Review security configuration

h. Click View Log to save the log for later reference. It is recommended that you choose a file naming scheme and location so these logs can be used to retain a history of the changes that are applied to the system. Open and review the saved log to verify that security was applied as expected. 2. Modify and verify. After completing the deployment and configuration process, we might need to make some final configurations and verify that solution process is complete and consistent. The following tasks are common in this stage: a. Optional modification of existing case instances. Changing a solution and redeploying it can affect existing case instances. IBM Case Manager tools help modifying existing case instances, including precondition checking and case synchronization.

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b. Verify deployed solutions. Before releasing the system for testers or case workers to use, the deployed solution should be tested to verify that all of its components are working correctly. The tests are specific to the solution and vary depending on the features of the solution and behaviors of its cases. The following sample of tests might be run from Case Manager Client: • • • • Access the newly deployed solution from Case Manager Client. Use the Add Case feature to create a case instance. Verify that the preconditions for the case are met. Use the search case function to find the case instance that was created. Open the case and visit various pages while reviewing the data that is displayed in the views.

c. Open and complete a work item from an in-basket to verify that the workflow system is operating properly. d. Repeat the tests by using different user accounts that belong to groups that are assigned to different roles. Confirm that the assigned permissions reflect the expected behavior for the roles. Note: For more information about redeployment restrictions and synchronizing cases with case type changes, see the IBM Case Manager 5.2 Information Center topic “Synchronizing cases with solution data”, which is available at this website: http://pic.dhe.ibm.com/infocenter/casemgmt/v5r2m0/topic/com.ibm.case mgmt.design.doc/acmdr005a.htm

9.6.2 Configuring FileNet P8 assets
In this section, we describe how to configure a component queue that is referenced by the solution application that we migrated. This is one example of configuration steps that might be required for other FileNet P8 assets after a solution is migrated and deployed. For a component queue, the Adapter and Operations tabs contain information that is brought to the destination system with the export and import of the queue definition by using the Process Configuration Console. Some properties might need modification to reflect the destination system. For example, the JAAS credentials often must be updated to reflect the correct user account for processing the component queue on the target environment.

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For more information about the Java adapter and its properties, see “Creating a component queue” in the FileNet P8 Information Center, which is available at this website: http://pic.dhe.ibm.com/infocenter/p8docs/v5r2m0/topic/com.ibm.p8.pe.con figui.doc/bpfc084.htm Note: For more information about a complete example for this configure step, see Part 2 - phase 4 of the Solution Deployment guide, which is available at this website: https://www.ibm.com/developerworks/community/blogs/e8206aad-10e2-4c4 9-b00c-fee572815374/entry/ibm_case_manager_5_2_solution_deployment_g uide

9.6.3 Configuring other IBM and external artifacts
The following examples of configuration steps are required for other IBM and external artifacts: 1. Register target environment on desktop. In this step, you register the target environment to which the solution was deployed. You can register target environments for a test environment or production environment by using the IBM Case Manager configuration tool or administration client. 2. Complete IBM Content Navigator desktop configuration. Because the source environment and the target environment are different, more configuration is often required before the imported desktop is usable. For more information about common issues and their resolution, see Part 3 of the Solution Deployment Guide, which is available at this website: https://www.ibm.com/developerworks/community/blogs/e8206aad-10e2-4c4 9-b00c-fee572815374/entry/ibm_case_manager_5_2_solution_deployment_g uide?lang=en

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Part 3

Part

3

Solution customization and advanced topics
This part describes IBM Case Manager solution customization topics, such as user interface customization, development, rules, security, and advanced topics. This part includes the following chapters: Chapter 10, “User interface and widgets” on page 357 Chapter 11, “Customization topics” on page 411 Chapter 12, “Advanced solution topics” on page 453 Chapter 13, “Business rules” on page 507 Chapter 14, “Integration points” on page 545

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Chapter 10.

User interface and widgets
This chapter describes the user interface of IBM Case Manager solutions. The chapter introduces working with default widgets, creating a custom widget with Model API and Dojo, manipulating pages in Page Designer, controlling payloads, and customizing the runtime appearance. This chapter includes the following sections: User interface navigation Understanding page types and custom pages Accessing the Properties View Designer Using default widgets and their payloads Creating and deploying a custom widget Creating a custom task Using the Timeline Visualizer and Instruction widgets

© Copyright IBM Corp. 2013, 2014. All rights reserved.

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10.1 User interface navigation
In IBM Case Manager, users can navigate easily between Case Manager Builder and Case Manager Client. The user interface for Case Manager Builder allows business analysts to design and develop case solutions through multiple tabs and tools. The user interface for Case Manager Client provides case workers with customized page layouts and tabbed views. To open Case Manager Client from Case Manager Builder, click the Test link on a specified solution within Case Manager Builder.

10.1.1 Navigating Case Manager Builder
With the Customer Complaints Solution deployed and in edit mode in Case Manager Builder, the tabs list the properties, roles, in-baskets, document types, pages, and case types, as shown in Figure 10-1.

Figure 10-1 Viewing the tabs in Case Manager Builder

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10.1.2 Navigating Page Designer
Within Case Manager Builder, Page Designer allows business analysts to design the page layout, widget event wiring, widget settings, and appearance of pages. Page Designer is where preinstalled widgets and custom widgets are wired to other widgets on the page. By using Page Designer, you also can edit the settings of the preinstalled and custom widgets on the page. After the changes on a page are saved, the business analyst must deploy the solution before the changes are seen on the page in Case Manager Client.

Widget palette area
The preinstalled widgets and the custom widgets are in the widget palette area of Page Designer, as shown in Figure 10-2. The preinstalled widgets are categorized into Case widgets and Utility widgets. Custom widgets that have a custom category also appear here. Business analysts can drag widgets from the widget palette area to the main layout area to add them to the page.

Figure 10-2 Widget palette area in Page Designer

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Main layout area
The main layout area of Page Designer, as shown in Figure 10-3, is where the widgets are displayed on the page and where they are added, deleted, rearranged, resized, wired to other widgets, or have their settings modified.

Figure 10-3 Main layout area in Page Designer

In the main layout area, the widgets are laid out according to how the layout is set in the page options settings. There are icons on each widget to change its settings and wiring. Also, each widget on the main layout area can have its height adjusted to automatically fill its allotted section or to be a specific percentage or pixel count of its size. Each widget has the following height settings: Automatic: This setting means that the widget does not have an explicit height. The widget grows in the specific column until the widget’s height conflicts with another widget’s specified height. Percent: This setting means that the widget grows in the specific column by the specified percentage.

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Pixel: This setting means that the widget grows in the specific column by the specified pixel count. Note: When you are setting the size of a widget in Page Designer, make sure to confirm and verify the wanted sizing of the widget in Case Manager Client.

Toolbar area
The toolbar area of Page Designer allows the business analyst to open the Page Options pop-up window, open the Wire Events pop-up window, show or hide the hidden widget area, and show or hide borders on the page. All of these options are in the form of four icons in the toolbar area, as shown in Figure 10-4.

Figure 10-4 Toolbar area in Page Designer

Page Options
The Page Options pop-up window in Page Designer allows a business analyst to change the page title, set the layout of the page, and add sizing options to the sections of a page. In Figure 10-5 on page 362, the Page Options pop-up window shows the page title and layout style for the Cases page. The Page title allows the business analyst to change the name of the page, add a special character, and append a case ID, case title, step name, or work item ID.

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The Layout style allows the business analyst to choose a one-column, two-row, two-column, three-column, or three-column header, two-column header or footer, two-column header, or two-column footer. Layout style also allows the business analyst to set the columns as collapsible or collapsed by default. The columns can be sized according to a specified number of pixels or by a specified percentage. Note: The collapsible option allows the case worker to toggle the specified column to be shown or hidden on the page in Case Manager Client.

Figure 10-5 Page options in Page Designer

Editing widget wiring and settings
Wiring a preinstalled widget or custom widget is done through the Wiring Events pop-up window in Page Designer or by clicking the Edit wiring icon on a specific widget. Both options to edit wiring are shown in Figure 10-6 on page 363.

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Figure 10-6 Two options to open the Wire Events pop-up window.

Each preinstalled widget in IBM Case Manager includes events that are incoming or outgoing events that can be wired to another widget. In the Wire events pop-up window, widgets can subscribe to an outgoing event from another widget or broadcast an event to another widget. For more information about the incoming and outgoing events for each widget, see the IBM Case Manager Information Center, which is available at this website: http://pic.dhe.ibm.com/infocenter/casemgmt/v5r2m0/topic/com.ibm.casemgm t.help.doc/acmwc026.htm

Show or hide borders and hidden widgets
In Page Designer, there is a show or hide borders icon and a show or hide hidden widget icon that can be toggled on or off in the Toolbar area. The show or hide border icon allows the business analyst to show or hide border lines around the columns on the page. When enabled, the border lines are visible during design time in Page Designer and in run time in Case Manager Client. The show or hide hidden widget icon allows the business analyst to add or remove widgets from the hidden widget area that does not render the widgets in run time in Case Manager Client. However, the widgets still load and function as if they are visible on the page.

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10.1.3 Multiple user editing
In IBM Case Manager V5.2, different users can edit different portions of a solution simultaneously, commit the changes, and deploy their changes independently. After one user modifies a solution asset, such as a page, view, business rule, in-basket, role, document type, case type, or task, that solution asset is locked until the user saves and commits the changes. After changes to solution assets are committed and deployed, the changes to the solution assets are available in Case Manager Client to the other users of the solution. As shown in Figure 10-7, Case Manager Builder has a pop-up window that shows lock information about what solution assets are locked by which user.

Figure 10-7 Lock Information pop-up window in Case Manager Builder

Note: If there are any locked items by another user, Case Manager Builder warns you when you attempt to deploy the solution.

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For more information about multi-user usage, see 5.4.1, “Multiple user solution development in Case Manager Builder” on page 167, and the IBM Case Manager Information Center, which is available at this website: http://pic.dhe.ibm.com/infocenter/casemgmt/v5r2m0/topic/com.ibm.casemgm t.help.doc/acmsdh54.htm

10.1.4 Navigating Case Manager Client
IBM Case Manager enables users to access cases through case URLs. The URL can be sent via email. When the user clicks the link, IBM Case Manager automatically opens the case detail page for user handling.

10.2 Understanding page types and custom pages
This section describes how to manipulate the pages in Page Designer within Case Manager Builder. When you first deploy a solution, IBM Case Manager automatically creates a set of default pages. You can create more pages to use with your case management application. This section introduces how to create, customize, and design pages in Page Designer in IBM Case Manager. This section assumes that you created, deployed, and tested your solution with the Case Manager Builder application in your development environment. If you have not done so, read the following chapters before you proceed: Chapter 7, “Building a simple solution: Part 1” on page 211 Chapter 8, “Building a simple solution: Part 2” on page 267

10.2.1 Default pages
Case Manager Client automatically creates the following page types for every deployed solution: Solution Case Details Add Case Split Case Add Task Work Details Custom Task Details Every page type contains corresponding default pages.

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Solution
The Solution page type is the main IBM Case Manager page type. This page type contains the following default pages: Work page (for displaying work items) Cases page (for displaying case instances)

Case Details
The Case Details page type allows a case worker to view or update properties for a case. The Case Details page also allows the case worker to add documents, tasks, or comments to the case. This page type contains the following default pages: Case Details (for viewing or updating a case) Case Details Form (for viewing or updating a case with a Form)

Add Case
The Add Case page type allows a case worker to create specific cases. This page type contains the following pages: Add Case (for creating a new case) Add Case Form (for creating a new case with a Form)

Split Case
The Split Case page type allows a case worker to create a case that is based on existing cases. This page type contains the default page Split Case, which is used for creating a case with the reused values from an existing case.

Add Task
The Add Task page type displays when a case worker adds a discretionary task to a case. This page type contains the following default pages: Add Task (for adding a task, adding a document, or viewing documents) Add Task Form (for adding a task, adding a document, or viewing documents with a Form)

Work Details
The Work Details page type includes the step pages that display when a case worker opens a work item. This page type contains the following default pages: Work Details (for viewing, updating, or completing a work item) Work Details Form (for viewing, updating, or completing a work item with a Form)

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Form Attachment Work Details Page (for saving a form data document to a step)

Custom Task Details
The Custom Task Details page type displays a step page that allows a case worker to open a work item from a custom task. This page type contains the default page Custom Task Details, which is used for viewing details about a work item from a custom task. For more information, see the IBM Case Manager Information Center, which is available at this website: http://pic.dhe.ibm.com/infocenter/casemgmt/v5r2m0/topic/com.ibm.casemgm t.help.doc/acmwrh19.htm

10.2.2 Custom pages
You can create pages for case workers for each different page type to meet specified requirements.

Creating a page
To customize a page as a specific page type, create a page and configure widgets and delete widgets as needed.

Customizing a created page in Page Designer
Complete the following steps to customize a page in a Solution page type: 1. In Case Manager Builder, click Edit on the solution, then browse to the Pages tab and complete the following steps to add the page: a. Click Add Page  Solution Page. b. Enter a value for the page name then click OK to register the page as a Solution page, as shown in Figure 10-8 on page 368. You also can enter a description for the page. These steps also apply for the other page types.

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Figure 10-8 Custom Solution page registration

2. After the page is registered, click the hyperlink on the page name or the first icon to open Page Designer, as shown in Figure 10-9 on page 369. This is where widgets and the page layout can be customized.

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Figure 10-9 Icons to open, edit, copy, or delete a page in Case Manager Builder

3. After opening Page Designer, click the Page options icon in the Toolbar area. Change the layout to three-column header. The page layout changes to a different layout. A header is a top section of the page in which the toolbar widget is placed. You also can rename the page in the Page options pop-up window. 4. Dragging a widget from the widget palette area to the main layout area adds the widget to the page. Drag the Toolbar widget to the header section of the page, as shown in Figure 10-10 on page 370.

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Figure 10-10 Dragging the Toolbar widget to the main layout area

5. Repeat step 4 for the Search and Case List widget. Drag the Search widget into the left column and the Case List widget into the center column. Click Save or Save and close to save the changes in Page Designer. Note: Because Case List has handler functions for the Search widget’s search cases event, the Case List widget does not need to be wired to the Search widget to display case items.

Adding a custom page to a case type, role, or work item
After a page is designed and saved, adding the custom page to a case type, role, or work item shows the page to the specific user when the user browses Case Manager Client. This comes after the page is saved and Page Designer is closed.

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Only the Custom Task Details, Add Case, Split Case, and Case Details page types can be specified for a case type. To assign a custom page to a case type, complete the following steps: 1. In Case Manager Builder, click the Case Types tab and select the case type. 2. Select the appropriate custom page that was created by selecting from the following drop-down menus: – – – – Default layout for Custom Task Details page Default layout for Add Case page Default layout for Split Case page Default layout for Case Details page

3. To set a custom default case details page for a specific role, select the role and click Add Role under the Override default case details page layout for label. Only Solution page types can be specified for a role. To assign a custom page to a role, complete the following steps: 1. In Case Manager Builder, click the Roles tab and then click the specified role or the pencil icon to edit the role. 2. Click the Pages tab when you are editing the role and then click the Assign Page drop-down menu to select the newly created custom page, as shown in Figure 10-11 on page 372. Make sure to click OK to confirm your changes and then save your changes in Case Manager Builder.

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Figure 10-11 Associating a custom page with a role

Only Work Details page types can be specified for a work item. To assign a custom page as the default Work Details page for a step in a task, complete the following steps: 1. In Case Manager Builder, click the Case Types tab and select the case type. 2. Select Tasks to open the Tasks page. 3. On the wanted task, click the Edit Steps icon to open Step Designer. 4. Within Step Designer, select the step and in the Step Properties area, select the wanted page from the Page Layout drop-down menu.

10.3 Accessing the Properties View Designer
This section describes the new Properties View Designer in IBM Case Manager. The Properties View Designer defines views to display different layouts for the Properties widget. The Properties widget can display a system-generated view or a custom view that is designed by the user.

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10.3.1 System-generated view
The system-generated view is a view that is automatically rendered by the Properties widget. It has a standard format that consists of all of the properties in the case type that are arranged vertically in alphabetical order.

10.3.2 Designing a custom view
Augmenting the system-generated view is useful for many different scenarios. For example, the business analyst might want to include only a subset of case properties in the case type, control the ordering of case properties in the case type, or place the case properties into a layout that includes multiple columns and tabs. In addition, the business analyst might need to set up different views for each role. By using the Properties View Designer, you can create various custom views for each case type. Before you access the Properties View Designer, ensure that the wanted case properties are in the Properties page for a case type in Case Manager Builder. Complete the following steps: 1. In the Views page of the case type, click the Properties Layout tab to list any custom views that are created. 2. Click Add View and enter a name and description for the new custom view, as shown in Figure 10-12. Click OK to confirm the new view.

Figure 10-12 Adding a custom view on the Properties Layout tab

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3. Click the name of the newly created custom view or the open properties view designer icon to open the Properties View Designer. The user interface is structured similarly to the Page Designer tool. The left pane has the different containers to drag onto the canvas. The left pane also has the properties of the case type to drag into the different containers on the canvas, which is the main layout area in the center of the Properties View Designer. There is a top toolbar where the business analyst can cut, copy, move, undo, redo, and change the padding between the properties. 4. Drag the Tabbed layout container to the white shaded region, as shown in Figure 10-13.

Figure 10-13 Adding a container to the Properties View Designer

5. After dragging the tabbed layout container into the canvas, two tabs are shown in the container. Click and rename the tab title to be Customer Related in the title field for the Settings pane. The second tab can be renamed as Complaint Related. 6. Proceed to drag properties that relate to the Customer into the Customer Related tab. Then, drag properties that relate to the Complaint into the Complaint Related tab. The result is shown in Figure 10-14 on page 375.

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Figure 10-14 Adding properties to the tabbed layout container

For more information, see the IBM Case Manager Information Center, which is available at this website: http://pic.dhe.ibm.com/infocenter/casemgmt/v5r2m0/topic/com.ibm.casemgm t.help.doc/acmsdh60.htm

10.3.3 Configuring the default view for a case type
The default view can be accessed through the Views tab within a specific case type. Selecting a default view (whether it is the system-generated view or the default view) renders that view for all the pages that the Properties widget is on. Alternatively, you can specify what view to show on a specific page through the Edit Settings window on the Properties widget.

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By default, the default view for a case type is the system-generated view. The system-generated view displays each property in the case type vertically without any custom layout. Note: When you are configuring the Properties widget view, we recommend that you configure the system-generated view or a custom view as the default view for a particular case type. The default view is rendered in the Properties widget whenever the Properties widget is not specifically configured to render another view. To configure the default view for a case type, complete the following steps: 1. In the Properties Layout tab, ensure that the default view is set to the newly created custom view, as shown in Figure 10-15. This renders the properties layout with the newly created custom view.

Figure 10-15 Setting the default view of a case type with a custom view

2. After setting the default view of a case, validate in Case Manager Client that the custom view that is selected as the default view shows up in the Case Details page.

10.3.4 Overriding the default view in the Properties widget
In some cases, you might want the Properties widget to render a different view than the default view for a particular case type. You can configure the Properties widget to render the system-generated view or a specific custom view. Complete the following steps: 1. Within Page Designer for a Case Details page, click the Edit Settings icon for the Properties widget.

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2. In the settings pop-up window for the Properties widget, click the Add icon to add the newly created custom view to the Properties widget, as shown in Figure 10-16. Make sure to save the page and deploy the changes to see the new custom view in the Case Details page in Case Manager Client.

Figure 10-16 Setting a custom view in the settings window of the Properties widget

Note: If the Properties widget is configured in this manner, the default view setting is ignored. To minimize the configuration burden of setting a view for each case type in the Properties widget, you should override the default view only when necessary.

10.4 Using default widgets and their payloads
This section describes default widgets that are provided by IBM Case Manager and their payloads.

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10.4.1 Standard widgets that are provided by IBM Case Manager
Case Manager Client provides a series of widgets for case workers to manage cases and process work items. You can drag these widgets into your spaces and pages. The following standard widgets are provided by IBM Case Manager: Attachments widget Displays a list of the documents that are attached to a work item. Case Information widget Displays an overview of a case. It can display up to four views: Summary, documents, tasks, and history. Case List widget Receives search criteria from the Case Search widget or a custom search widget, runs the search, and displays the search result. Case Toolbar widget Provides actions that case workers can take for an opened case. Content List widget Runs a search that is based on a predefined search template and displays the list of matching documents. Form widget Used to view and edit case property values or work item fields values with the help of IBM Forms or FileNet eForms. In-baskets widget Allows users to view and work with work items in their personal in-basket and the in-basket that is associated with their role. Instruction widget Used to display the instructions for completing a work item that is associated with a custom task. Original Case Data widget Displays property values for a case that is split to create another case. A case worker can compare the values in this widget with the values that are displayed in the Split Case Data widget for the new case. Process History widget Shows the status of a task by showing the milestones that are defined in the process.

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Properties widget Used to enable case workers to view and edit the property values for a case or a work item. Script Adapter widget Transform data from one widget to another through widget event communication. Search widget Used to define the search conditions for cases that are based on selected property values. This widget works with the Case List widget to run queries for cases. Select Case Documents widget Used to select the documents from an existing case that also are to be associated with a new split case. Split Case Data widget Used to create a case that reuses property values from an existing case. Timeline Visualizer widget Provides a visual representation of the extended history for case events, tasks, and work items over time for the case. Toolbar widget Used to open a web page, add cases, manage roles, or run a custom action. Website widget Display the website that is associated with a specified URL. Work Item Toolbar widget Used to respond to work items or to add new tasks.

10.4.2 Widget payloads
The widget communication is established by events. Most Case Manager Client widgets publish events and handle events. The data that is published or handled by an event is called a payload. A widget can publish an event in the following ways: The widget can broadcast the published event to all other widgets on the page. The event is processed by any widget that can handle the published event.

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The widget can send the published event to specific widgets. This method of sending events is accomplished by wiring the published event to a corresponding event that is handled by the receiving widget. You can add a wire between a source widget and a target widget. When the source widget publishes the wired event, the published event is sent to the event handler (or handlers) in the widget (or widgets) to which it is wired.

10.4.3 Wiring a widget to another widget
To wire a widget to another widget, complete the following steps in Page Designer: 1. Click the Edit wiring icon on the individual widget in the main layout area or the Edit wiring icon in the Toolbar area, as shown in Figure 10-17.

Figure 10-17 Selecting Edit Wiring from the Widget menu icon

The Wire Events pop-up window opens with focus on the widget and the wiring it has with other widgets on the page.

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2. Ensure that the Script Adapter widget is selected in the Widget drop-down menu at the top of the Wire Events pop-up window. 3. Click the drop-down menu for Source widget and select Case List, then select Select Case as the outgoing event, as shown in Figure 10-18.

Figure 10-18 Wiring Case List widget to Script Adapter

The drop-down menu for the source widget includes all of the widgets in the page that can handle events. The widgets that can publish events only are not listed. 4. Click Add Wire and the two widgets are officially wired. An entry appears in the table, as shown in Figure 10-19.

Figure 10-19 Widget wiring entry

The source end of the wire displays the event that is sent by the source widget. The target end of the wire displays the event that the target widget receives. To change the source or outgoing event, click the drop-down menu for the source widget field or the outgoing event field. Then, click Add Wire to add a new widget wiring.

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It is possible to have multiple wirings to one widget or change the selected widget by clicking the widget drop-down menu on the top of the Edit Wiring window. 5. When you complete your wiring, click OK to exit the Edit Wiring pop-up window and save the changes. 6. To test the widget wiring, go into Case Manager Client and click one case instance in Case List widget. You can see that Script Adapter can receive the Select Case event, as shown in Figure 10-20.

Figure 10-20 Received event in the Script Adapter widget

10.4.4 Widget incoming and outgoing events and payloads
In IBM Case Manager V5.2, each widget has incoming and outgoing events whose payloads contain model objects or JavaScript Object Notation (JSON) properties. For preinstalled widgets, each incoming or outgoing event has a specific payload that contains an icm or ecm Model object. Model objects starting with icm refer to IBM Case Manager Model objects; model objects starting with ecm refer to IBM Content Navigator Model objects. Each Model object is an instance of an IBM Case Manager or IBM Content Navigator model class. For more information about the IBM Case Manager Model classes, see this website: http://pic.dhe.ibm.com/infocenter/casemgmt/v5r2m0/index.jsp?topic=%2Fco m.ibm.casemgmt.development.doc%2Fjsdoc%2Findex.html

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For more information about IBM Content Navigator Model classes, see this website: http://pic.dhe.ibm.com/infocenter/cmgmt/v8r4m0/index.jsp?topic=/com.ibm .developingeuc.doc/doc/JavaScriptdoc/index.html

10.4.5 In-basket widget event and corresponding payload
The events that are published by the In-baskets widget are listed in Table 10-1. This is an example of the events and payloads that a preinstalled widget generates.
Table 10-1 Event title In-basket selected Outgoing events that are broadcasted by the In-baskets widget Event ID icm.SelectInBasket Payload selectInbasket Description The user opened the page that contains the In-baskets widget or clicked a tab to display a different in-basket. The user clicked a row or pressed Enter in the in-basket to select the work item. Another widget requested information for the in-basket rows that are specified in the event payload.

Work item selected

com.ibm.ecmwidg ets.acm.SelectRow

WorkItem

Send selected work items

icm.SendSelectWo rkItems

result, selectWorkItems

The events that are handled by the In-baskets widget are listed in Table 10-2.
Table 10-2 Incoming events that are handled by the In-baskets widget Event title Apply filter Event ID icm.ApplyFilter Payload filter Description Update the work items that are listed in the in-basket that are based on the specified filters. Clear the content in the In-baskets widget. Refresh the in-basket to update the list of work items after a user completes or closes a work item.

Clear content Refresh

icm.ClearContent icm.Refresh

Empty Any value

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Event title Request selected work item

Event ID icm.RequestSelect WorkItems

Payload Any value

Description Send the information for the in-basket rows that are specified in the event payload. The In-basket widget handles the event and sends the specified work items along with the incoming payload. Updates the In-baskets widget to display the in-baskets that are associated with the specified role.

Role Selected

icm.ReceiveRole

role

For more information about incoming and outgoing events for each widget, see the IBM Case Manager Information Center, which is available at this website: http://pic.dhe.ibm.com/infocenter/casemgmt/v5r2m0/topic/com.ibm.casemgm t.help.doc/acmwc026.htm

10.4.6 Search widget event and corresponding payload
The event that is published by Search widget is shown in Table 10-3.
Table 10-3 Outgoing events that are broadcasted by the Search widget Event title Search cases Event ID icm.SearchCases Payload caseType, searchTemplate, caseTypeTitles, detailsViewProperties, magazineViewProperties Description The user starts a search for cases.

The event icm.SearchCases is an example of the following formats of a payload: caseType: A symbolic name of the specific case type that is being searched on. searchTemplate: An IBM Content Navigator model object (ecm.model.SearchTemplate) caseTypeTitles: A JSON object that has the titles of the types of cases that are being searched on. detailsViewProperties: An array of JSON objects that are the properties to be displayed in the details view of the Case List widget.

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magazineViewProperties: An array of JSON objects that are the properties to be displayed in the magazine view of the Case List widget. The event that is handled by Search widget is shown in Table 10-4.
Table 10-4 Incoming events that are handled by the Search widget Event title Clear content Event ID icm.ClearContent Payload null Description Clear the content in the Search widget.

Enhancements to the Search Widget
There are significant enhancements to the Search widget in IBM Case Manager V5.2 that allow users to apply advanced search options for case searching. In the Settings window of the Search widget in Page Designer, the business analyst can allow users to designate certain properties to be searched on as shown in Figure 10-21. This setting can be enabled or disabled within Page Designer for the Search widget. These are user-specified properties in Advanced Search.

Figure 10-21 Settings window for the Search widget

Specific case properties also can be configured to be searched on in the Advanced Search window through the Case Search view in a case type, as shown in Figure 10-22 on page 386.

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Figure 10-22 Adding properties to the Case Search view

In Case Manager Client, the case worker can click the Advanced Search link to search on specific case properties. The case worker can then specify any other properties in the user-specified properties section on the Advanced Search window. Note: The search results that are displayed in the Case List widget from the Search widget can be shown in a Details view or a Magazine view. The Details view and Magazine views for the Case List widget can be found on the Case List widget in Case Manager Client and in the Settings window for the Case List in Case Manager Builder.

10.5 Creating and deploying a custom widget
This section describes how to create a widget that is called the Custom Search widget and deploy it in the IBM Case Manager, Version 5.2 environment. The Custom Search widget has a similar role to the Case Search widget. In simple search mode, the default Case Search widget uses only one property to search cases. The Custom Search widget allows a user to search cases against all properties, as shown in Figure 10-23 on page 387.

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Figure 10-23 Custom search widget in Case Manager Client

For more information about the custom search widget, see the Converting a Custom Search Widget from Case Manager 5.1.1 to Case Manager 5.2 developerWorks® article, which is available at this website: https://www.ibm.com/developerworks/community/groups/service/html/commun ityview?communityUuid=e8206aad-10e2-4c49-b00c-fee572815374#fullpageWidg etId=Wf2c4e43b120c_4ac7_80ae_2695b8e6d46d&file=e3ff1d40-31e0-469a-9ecfaa7a03e73a46 For more information about custom widgets in IBM Case Manager V5.2, see the IBM Case Manager Information Center, which is available at this website: http://pic.dhe.ibm.com/infocenter/casemgmt/v5r2m0/topic/com.ibm.casemgm t.development.doc/acmwt000.htm To create the Custom Search widget, you must set up your development environment first.

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10.5.1 Setting up your development environment
An IBM Case Manager 5.2 custom widget includes the following components: Widget definition JSON file Catalog JSON file IBM Content Navigator custom plug-in JAR file EAR file (optional) A custom widget in IBM Case Manager can be packaged in a JAR file or in a JAR and an EAR file. It is up to the application developer to choose whether to include an EAR file in the custom widget package. With an EAR file, an application developer can include the custom widget with a content pane inside of an EAR file, such as the custom search widget. With a JAR file, an application developer can package one or more IBM Content Navigator custom plug-ins. The following benefits are achieved by including the optional EAR file in the custom widget package: Separates IBM Content Navigator plug-in code from the custom widget code, which allows the application developer to add modularity Organizes multiple custom widgets within the EAR file apart from the JAR file, which allows the application developer to deploy and register one custom widget package Debugging the custom widget can be easier with folder path because of the modularity of the EAR file and the JAR file Can help avoid class path conflicts The following benefits are achieved by not including the optional EAR file in the custom widget package: Allows application developer to use only IBM Case Manager administration client to register and unregister the custom widget package. The application developer does not need to navigate to the application server. Convenient for simple widget testing and deployment because there is no other EAR file to maintain. To set up your development environment, create a project that contains the files for the Custom Search widget (see Figure 10-24 on page 389). You also can use Eclipse or another integrated development environment (IDE). Note: Ensure that you have the appropriate Java JRE or JDK configured on your Eclipse or IDE to compile the project or run the ANT file to build the widget package.

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Figure 10-24 Creating a project for the Custom Search widget

10.5.2 Creating your widget definition and catalog files
The widget definition and catalog JSON files are used to register the widget package and page widgets. In this example, these two JSON files are contained in a directory that is called ICMRegistry where this folder also can include images that are used for the widget package, such as thumbnails or icons and any translated resource files. As shown in Figure 10-24, the widget definition and catalog files are in the ICMRegistry directory. Complete the following steps to create your widget definition and catalog files: 1. Create the widget definition JSON file. The file mainly defines source files, events, and properties for the widget. Complete the following steps: a. The beginning clause of the widget definition file contains the ID, title, category, description, preview icon path, icon path, help path, and runtime class name, as shown in Example 10-1 on page 390.

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Example 10-1 Defining the beginning of the widget definition JSON file

{ "id":"CustomSearchWidget", "title":"Simple Custom Search Widget", "category":"CustomWidgets", "description":"This widget shows payload from Search Widget", "definition":"CustomSearchWidget.json", "preview": "images/caseinfo_preview.png", "icon": "images/caseinfo_icon.png", "runtimeClassName":"icm.custom.pgwidget.customSearchWidget.Custom SearchWidget", "help": "acmwrh126.htm", "previewThumbnail":"images/caseinfo_thumb.png", b. The second portion of the widget definition JSON file includes any properties to be included in the custom widget. In the custom search widget, there are two properties. These properties are in the Edit Settings window of the widget within Page Designer. One property is called PreferredHeight and another is customProperty1. They are shown in Example 10-2.
Example 10-2 Defining properties in widget definition JSON file "properties":[ { "propertyType":"property", "type":"string", "id":"PreferredHeight", "defaultValue":"100%", "disabled":true, "required": false, "visibility":false, "title":"Preferred Height" }, { "propertyType":"property", "type":"string", "id":"customProperty1", "defaultValue":"http://", "required":false, "visibility":true, "style": "width:95%;", "title":"Custom property 1" } ],

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c. The last portion of the widget definition JSON file is the events section where the application developer declares that the custom widget subscribes or publishes to an event. In the case of the custom search widget, it broadcasts the icm.SearchCases event, as shown in Example 10-3. The functionName is empty because we are not subscribing and handling an event.
Example 10-3 Events section for widget definition file

"events":[ { "id":"icm.SearchCases", "title":"Custom Search Event 1252", "functionName":"", "direction":"broadcast", "description":"Custom Event 1" } ] } 2. Create the catalog JSON file. The file has the description for the widget package and lists the widgets that the package holds. Complete the following steps: a. The first part of the catalog JSON file contains the name, description, version, categories, and locale, as shown in Example 10-4. The locale should be entered as shown in Example 10-4 if no locale is specified. For other locales, specify them under the folder nls in ICMRegistry. The categories and version fields are optional.
Example 10-4 First section of catalog JSON

{ "Name":"IBM Case Manager Custom Widget Package", "Description":"IBM Case Manager Custom Widget Package", "Locale":"", "Version":"5.2", "Categories":[ { "id":"CustomWidgets", "title":"Custom Widgets" } ],

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b. The last section of the catalog JSON includes the same first part of the widget definition file, as shown in Example 10-5. In the case of multiple widgets in one widget package, the other widget definitions are listed in this section of the catalog JSON file.
Example 10-5 Last section of catalog JSON

"Widgets":[ { "id":"CustomSearchWidget", "title":"Simple Custom Search Widget", "category":"CustomWidgets", "description":"This widget shows payload from Search Widget", "definition":"CustomSearchWidget.json", "preview": "images/caseinfo_preview.png", "icon": "images/caseinfo_icon.png", "runtimeClassName":"icm.custom.pgwidget.customSearchWidget.Custom SearchWidget", "help": "acmwrh126.htm", "previewThumbnail":"imags/caseinfo_thumb.png" } ] }

10.5.3 Creating the IBM Content Navigator plug-in
The IBM Content Navigator plug-in allows the custom widget to extend functions, widgets, actions, and services to IBM Content Navigator and to IBM Case Manager. The plug-in registers the Dojo module path for the runtime code for the custom widget. In the initial JavaScript file, it is important to load the CSS files that are used for the page widget and to register the Dojo module path for the custom widget’s runtime code, as shown in Example 10-6 on page 393.

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Example 10-6 Sample ICMCustomPlugin.js file

var icmContextRoot = "/ICMCustomWidgets"; var loadCSS = function(cssFileUrl){ if (dojo.isIE) { document.createStyleSheet(cssFileUrl); } else { var head = document.getElementsByTagName("head")[0]; var link = document.createElement("link"); link.rel = "stylesheet"; link.type = "text/css"; link.href = cssFileUrl; head.appendChild(link); } };

var paths = { "icm/custom":"/ICMCustomWidgets/icm/custom" }; require({paths:paths}); For more information about how to create plug-ins in IBM Content Navigator, see the IBM Redbooks publication, Customizing and Extending IBM Content Navigator, SG24-8055, which is available at this website: http://www.redbooks.ibm.com/abstracts/sg248055.html

10.5.4 Creating the custom page widget with content pane
When a custom page widget is created, you should remember that an IBM Case Manager page widget or an IBM Case Manager custom widget is essentially a Dojo dijit. A Dojo dijit is a widget that is part of Dojo’s User Interface (UI) library. The IBM Case Manager page widget adds the following facilities to the standard Dojo dijit: Page container events Widget settings These facilities enable the page widget construction and allow the business analyst to dynamically adjust page behavior without any (or very little) programming.

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When a page widget is created, you first create a normal Dojo dijit, which is responsible for rendering the user interface and handling user interaction to collect user input. Ideally, this dijit should be designed as a reusable component that takes in context and renders. The UI dijit should not access any IBM Case Manager Page container-related APIs, which limits its usage to only the IBM Case Manager Case Client. Separating the UI dijit from the page widget layer allows you to reuse this dijit in a custom application or plug-in built on top of IBM Content Navigator. The dijit also can be reused in a non-ECM environment if it does not use any ECM related API. The dijit should also make available necessary Dojo methods and events to allow interested parties (the page widget wrapper or other custom widgets) to exchange data or get notified by user interaction. After the user interface part of the page widget is finished, you create a page widget wrapper that extends this UI dijit and converts it into an IBM Case Manager page widget. The page widget wrapper should be the place where the page container-related code is kept. It accepts widget settings from the page container and passes them to the underlying dijit. It should also connect to Dojo events that are exposed on the dijit to be notified of user actions. As an optional separation, you can separate the event handling logic from the page widget when the event handling is getting complex. For example, if you have complex logic to pre-process or post-process the event data, you can create a separate event listener object, which holds the event handler implementations. Then, page widget can delegate the event handling logic to the event listener object. Figure 10-25 on page 395 shows the high-level idea of constructing a page widget. The classes in the black box implement and handle the user interface while the classes in the red box are base IBM Case Manager classes that the custom widget inherits.

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_Base Widget

_EventStub

WidgetContentPane

BasePageWidget

BaseActionContext

WidgetContentPane.html

Optional, for widget has toolbar/menus. API will covered in action framework. PageWidget

EventListener

Figure 10-25 Recommended structure for a custom page widget

Complete the following steps to create the custom page widget with content pane: 1. Create the content pane HTML page and content pane JavaScript file to display a user interface in the custom search widget. 2. Create the main custom widget JavaScript file, CustomSearchWidget.js. In CustomSearchWidget.js, the file grabs the values from the content pane HTML page from the user that ate based on the input, then uses the IBM Case Manager JavaScript Reference API to construct a search criteria payload, then broadcasts the search results and payload to the Case List widget to run the search. Note: It is important to follow the preferred practices of Dojo when developing widgets. It is strongly recommended to include and handle the lifecycle events that are defined in a Dojo widget, which include, but are not limited to, the constructor, postCreate, startup, and destroy. It is strongly recommended that you use the AMD style of declaring classes and modules because Dojo is dropping support for older Dojo-specific APIs in future versions.

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For more information about how to create a custom page widget, see this website: https://www.ibm.com/developerworks/community/blogs/e8206aad-10e2-4c4 9-b00c-fee572815374/resource/ACM_LP/ICM52CustomWidgets.pdf?lang=en

10.5.5 Creating IBM Case Manager JavaScript API calls and objects
The IBM Case Manager JavaScript API is useful for custom widgets to call certain actions and start events that are used by other preinstalled page widgets. The documented IBM Case Manager JavaScript API is available at this website: http://pic.dhe.ibm.com/infocenter/casemgmt/v5r2m0/index.jsp?topic=%2Fco m.ibm.casemgmt.development.doc%2Fjsdoc%2Findex.html In the custom search widget, the icm.util.SearchPayload class is started to create a search payload, set the schema and data structures, and send the search criteria and payload to the Case List widget, as shown in Example 10-7. There are two methods in the class: getSearchPayload() and setModel(model).
Example 10-7 Performing the custom search using IBM Case Manager JavaScript API

var solution = this.solution; var params = {}; params.ObjectStore = solution.targetObjectStore.id; var criterion = new ecm.model.SearchCriterion({"id": "CmAcmCaseIdentifier", "selectedOperator": "STARTSWITH", "dataType": "xs:string", "defaultValue" : "%", "value": "%", "values": ["%"]}); params.criterion = [criterion]; var ct; widget.solution.retrieveCaseTypes(function(theCaseTypes) { ct = theCaseTypes[0].name; }); params.caseType = ct; params.solution = solution; var searchPayload = new icm.util.SearchPayload(); searchPayload.setModel(params); var payload = searchPayload.getSearchPayload(); this.onBroadcastEvent("icm.SearchCases", payload);

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In setModel(model), it expects an IBM Case Manager JavaScript API object to be passed as a parameter. Certain IBM Case Manager JavaScript API methods require a parameter to be used as a callback function to perform processing on the object.

10.5.6 Building the custom widget package
Package the custom search widget by using three separate Apache Ant build scripts files to create the widget package with the IBM Content Navigator plug-in JAR file and the custom page widget EAR and WAR files. The first build.xml file creates the IBM Content Navigator plug-in file, as shown in Example 10-8. Note: To build the IBM Content Navigator plug-in JAR file, the navigatorAPI.jar file must be included in Eclipse or the IDE. The navigatorAPI.jar file often is found in ...\ECMClient\configure\lib.
Example 10-8 Ant build file for the IBM Content Navigator plug-in JAR file

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The second build.xml file creates the WAR and EAR files for the custom page widget, as shown in Example 10-9.
Example 10-9 Ant build file for the custom page widget EAR and WAR files

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The third build.xml file packages the IBM Content Navigator plug-in JAR file, the EAR file for the custom page widget, and the directory that is holding the widget definition and catalog JSON files into one .zip file that is ready to deploy into IBM Case Manager, as shown in Example 10-10.
Example 10-10 Main Ant build file

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10.5.7 Deploying the custom widget package
If the custom widget package does not contain the optional EAR file, the IBM Case Manager administration client deploys and registers the custom widget package. If the custom widget package contains an optional EAR file, the IBM Case Manager configuration tool deploys and registers the custom widget package. Both options are described in this section. Do not perform both options; instead, perform only one option, depending on the structure of the custom widget package. Complete the following steps to deploy the custom widget package by using the IBM Case Manager administration client: 1. Open the IBM Case Manager administration client. 2. Click to open the design object store under the Object Stores folder in the navigation tree. 3. Click the Widget Packages folder to open it in a new tab, as shown in Figure 10-26.

Figure 10-26 Widget Packages tab in Case Manager administration client

4. Click Register Custom Widgets.

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5. Browse to the newly created custom widget package file. Then, click Next. 6. Verify the selected widget package details and click Finish to register the custom widget package, as shown in Figure 10-27. Note: Selecting the Replace if already registered option in the Verify the selected widgets package window replaces the existing custom widget with the updated widget package if the custom widget package is already deployed and registered on the Application Server.

Figure 10-27 Verify selected widgets package in the administration client

Complete the following steps to deploy a custom widget package by using the IBM Case Manager configuration tool: 1. Open the IBM Case Manager configuration tool. 2. Click File Open Profile and select the IBM Case Manager configuration profile file. 3. Right-click Deploy and Register Widgets Package and select Copy Selected Task, as shown in Figure 10-28 on page 402. A copy of the existing task with the existing values is made.

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Figure 10-28 Copying the Deploy and Register Widgets Package task

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4. Open the newly copied Deploy and Register Widgets package task. Change the value in Widgets package file path to the path of the newly created custom widget package, as shown in Figure 10-29.

Figure 10-29 Modifying the Widgets package file path in the configuration tool

5. After all of the information is verified as correct on the copied version of the Deploy and Register Widgets Package, click Save and then click Run Task. 6. Validate that you see that the task finished running successfully without any errors in the Console window on the bottom of the IBM Case Manager configuration tool. The expected output looks as is shown in the following example: Starting to run Copy_of_Deploy and Register Widgets Package Copy_of_Deploy and Register Widgets Package ************ Finished running Copy_of_Deploy and Register Widgets Package

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Note: If the custom widget package is deployed and registered on the Application Server, rerunning the Deploy and Register Widgets Package with the updated custom widget package updates the existing widget package. If there are changes to the widget definition or catalog JSON files, it is strongly recommended that you uninstall the custom widget package and then reinstall it.

10.5.8 Adding the custom widget to the page
After successfully deploying and registering the custom widget package by using the IBM Case Manager administration client or the IBM Case Manager configuration tool, the custom widget must be added to the page (or pages) via Page Designer. Note: If the custom widget package includes an EAR file, make sure that the custom widget enterprise application in WebSphere or other application server is started before the custom widget is added to the page. Complete the following steps to add the custom widget to the page: 1. In IBM Case Manager Builder, edit the wanted solution. 2. Open Page Designer with the wanted page on which to add the custom widget. For the custom search widget, it is added to the Cases page. 3. Drag the custom widget from the widget palette to the main layout area, as shown in Figure 10-30 on page 405. Note: The custom widget's catalog and definition JSON files specify the widget palette category section in which the widget appears within Case Manager Builder.

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Figure 10-30 Dragging the custom search widget onto the main layout area

4. Click Save to save the custom widget onto the page. 5. Open Case Manager Client to view the new custom widget (or widgets).

10.6 Creating a custom task
This section shows a simple step-by-step example of how to create a custom task in IBM Case Manager V5.2. A custom task allows a case worker to define a custom workflow for a work item. Case workers can now create custom tasks to represent procedures that are not predefined in the case type. For more information about custom tasks, see the IBM Case Manager Information Center at this website: http://pic.dhe.ibm.com/infocenter/casemgmt/v5r2m0/topic/com.ibm.casemgm t.client.doc/acmrth09.htm

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Custom tasks must be enabled for the solution before case workers can make use of this feature. Complete the following steps: 1. Open Case Manager Builder and edit the wanted solution. 2. Edit the wanted case type. 3. On the Case Type attributes page, select the Enable case workers to create custom tasks option, as shown in Figure 10-31.

Figure 10-31 Enable case workers to create custom tasks

After the custom tasks are enabled, make sure that you commit the changes and deploy the solution. Then, the case worker can create custom tasks by completing the following steps: 1. Browse to the case details, work details, or the tasks tab in the Case Information widget to create a custom task. Click Add custom task to create a custom task. The custom task editor pop-up window opens to allow the case worker to start creating the custom task. 2. Enter a name and a description for the custom task.

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3. Click insert an item and choose from the following options: – Work item: i. Enter the name for the work item. ii. Assign the work item to a user or group. iii. Click the editable properties for this work item drop-down menu to include case properties to include in the custom task. iv. Click the deadline drop-down menu to specify a time frame for which the work item must be completed. v. Enter instructions to complete the work item. A document reference, the value of a selected case property, and a hyperlink can be added to the instruction field. – Decision point: i. Enter a label for the response button. ii. Insert an item for the decision point and add any child items if the user selects the response. Note: A decision point must follow a work item. The user must make a decision if the work item is assigned to the user. – Wait until or for Enter a date and time to delay a work item until a specific time and date or for a specified amount of time. 4. After a custom task is created, click Validate to validate the task and click Start to start the custom task. Figure 10-32 on page 408 shows a sample custom task.

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Figure 10-32 Sample custom task

10.7 Using the Timeline Visualizer and Instruction widgets
This section describes the Timeline Visualizer widget and the Instruction widget, which are the two new preinstalled widgets for IBM Case Manager V5.2. The Timeline Visualizer widget provides a visual representation of the history of a case. For more information about the timeline visualizer widget, see the IBM Case Manager Information Center at this website: http://pic.dhe.ibm.com/infocenter/casemgmt/v5r2m0/topic/com.ibm.casemgm t.help.doc/acmwrh124.htm The Instruction widget displays instructions to complete a work item through a custom task. For more information about the instruction widget, see the IBM Case Manager Information Center at this website: http://pic.dhe.ibm.com/infocenter/casemgmt/v5r2m0/index.jsp?topic=%2Fco m.ibm.casemgmt.help.doc%2Facmwrh129.htm

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10.7.1 Configuring auditing and case history store
To use the Timeline Visualizer widget, it is necessary to configure auditing and a case history store to track the history of the cases. Complete the following steps to configure auditing and the case history store for the Timeline Visualizer widget: 1. Open the IBM Case Manager administration client. 2. Select the design or staging object store and select Solutions. 3. Right-click the wanted solution and select Configure Auditing. 4. Follow the wizard steps to configure auditing. Select the appropriate properties to audit within the wizard and apply the audit profile. For more information about configuring auditing, see the IBM Case Manager Information Center at this website: http://pic.dhe.ibm.com/infocenter/casemgmt/v5r2m0/index.jsp?topic=%2 Fcom.ibm.casemgmt.design.doc%2Facmdt036.htm After auditing is configured, a new case history store must be made to hold the data that is needed by the Timeline Visualizer widget to track extended history of cases. 5. Within the IBM Case Manager administration client, click the target object store to open it in a new tab. 6. Click New Case History Store and follow the wizard to create a case history store for the target object store.

10.7.2 Displaying case history in the Timeline Visualizer widget
The Timeline Visualizer widget contains a horizontal bar as the timeline, which shows the time duration and the work items for the case. The Timeline Visualizer also uses vertical bars to represent events. Through an event density histogram, the widget displays a view of when case events occurred over the life of a case. The user interface of the Timeline Visualizer widget includes a primary and a secondary timeline. The primary timeline shows the duration of the entire case. Users can move sliders and zoom in on the specific range within the case timeline, which is represented by the secondary timeline. The Timeline Visualizer widget is on the case details page by default. The user interface of the Timeline Visualizer widget (when it is maximized) is shown in Figure 10-33 on page 410.

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Toolbar

Primary Timeline

Histogram

Secondary Timeline (zoom) Case Series

Tasks and Step Series

Figure 10-33 Timeline Visualizer widget user interface

10.7.3 Displaying instructions in the Instruction widget
The Instruction widget displays the instructions for completing a work item as set in the instructions field creating a custom task is created. The instructions are displayed in rich text format and can include hyperlinks and property values. The Instruction widget is on the Custom Task Details page by default. A sample view of the Instruction widget is shown in Figure 10-34.

Figure 10-34 Sample view of Instruction widget

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Chapter 11.

Customization topics
This chapter provides a detailed description of many important or advanced topics that you might need to learn when you customize a case management solution. This chapter includes the following sections: Using project areas when developing solutions Automated handling of ingested documents Splitting a case Basic customization scenarios Intermediate customization scenarios Advanced customization scenarios Multilingual support

© Copyright IBM Corp. 2013, 2014. All rights reserved.

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11.1 Using project areas when developing solutions
Companies require solutions for various purposes. Creating these solutions requires the involvement of various teams, business analysts, and the departments of the organization. The solutions can be grouped by using project areas so that only the relevant business analysts are given access privileges to the solution and solution definition. Project areas add security and autonomy to IBM Case Manager solution development. In addition, project areas help to limit the effect of resetting the test environment to other users who are working on other projects in the same development environment. Resetting the test environment removes deployed case solution artifacts from the target object store and the process configuration information. A reset also reinitializes the target object store and the isolated region that is associated with the project area. Instead of resetting everything in a test environment, you can use project areas to reset the development environment only of a particular project area. This isolation prevents the reset that disrupts the work of other business analysts who are working on different project areas. Note: Before resetting the test environment, it is important to save user-defined assets from the target object store or they are deleted and cannot be restored. For more information about how to save user-defined assets, see the IBM Case Manager Information Center at this website: http://pic.dhe.ibm.com/infocenter/casemgmt/v5r2m0/index.jsp?topic=%2 Fcom.ibm.casemgmt.design.doc%2Facmdr001.htm Users and solutions can easily be moved from one project area to another, but each user can belong only to one other project area in addition to the default project area. After a user is assigned to a project area, the user can modify or define solutions within that specific project area. Project areas are available only in the development environment. There is at least one default project area. You can create secondary project areas according to your business needs. Project areas can be created and modified by using Case Manager administration client, the Case Manager configuration tool, or the command line.

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We recommend the use of the Case Manager administration client to manage project areas. For more information about how to set up and manage project areas in IBM Case Manager V5.2, see the IBM Case Manager Information Center at this website: http://pic.dhe.ibm.com/infocenter/casemgmt/v5r2m0/topic/com.ibm.casemgm t.design.doc/acmdt015.htm

11.2 Automated handling of ingested documents
Case Manager solutions often ingest incoming documents from external systems. These documents can be from any of the following sources: Scanned documents: – Datacap Taskmaster and other capture systems – Desktop scanning software IBM Content Collector: – IBM Content Collector for Email (Microsoft Exchange, IBM Lotus Domino®, or SMTP) – IBM Content Collector for Sharepoint – IBM Content Collector for Files Microsoft Office: – FileNet Integration for Microsoft Office (Microsoft Outlook) – FileNet Integration for Microsoft Office – FileNet Services for IBM Lotus Quickr® (Microsoft Office or IBM Lotus Notes®) Desktop documents: – Documents that are uploaded into the system with Workplace or WorkplaceXT – FileNet Services for Lotus Quickr – Drag-and-drop with IBM Case Manager, IBM Content Navigator, and WorkplaceXT APIs: – Java – Content Manager Interoperability Services (CMIS) – WebDAV

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Other systems: – IBM Content Platform Engine Bulk Import Tool – Third-party software that interfaces with FileNet APIs to ingest documents

11.2.1 Generalized approach for handling ingested documents
Whenever possible, it is an efficient and good practice to automatically handle these incoming documents; for example, by automatically attaching them to existing relevant cases or creating cases and attaching them to these created cases. To design a process that automatically handles the ingested documents, consider the following factors: The document ingest software should classify only the document according to the document types that are defined in the solution. The case type and document type have a property (or set of properties) that serves as the key to the case. That is, each case has a unique, business-level identifier that is associated with every case. Examples of keys are Claim Number, Loan Number, Investigation ID, Case Number, Quote Number, and Request Number. Every ingested document that is filed into a case folder is indexed with this key. An event action can be triggered by the document class (type) if there is an event subscription to the creation event. The event action locates the corresponding case folder by using the case identification key from the document and files the document into the case folder.

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11.2.2 Implementation methods
Table 11-1 lists several ways to implement the automation process.
Table 11-1 Implementation methods for automated case document filing Location Client-side Method Custom code that runs on client application JavaScript Event Action Description The client application runs the case folder search and stores the document in the matching case folder upon ingest. A JavaScript based event action is created to handle the matching and filing of the case document. This method is appropriate for low-volume and non-production implementations. A Java based event action is created to handle the matching and filing of the case document. This method is the best method for production implementations. A workflow-based event action starts a workflow to perform some processing that is based on a document or folder action.

Server-side

Server-side

Java Event Action

Server-side

Workflow Event Action

11.2.3 Sample JavaScript based implementation procedure
You can implement the automated-filing of the ingested documents by using JavaScript. From Case Manager Builder, complete the following steps: 1. Define the case property that is to be used as the key. For example, use Case Number as the key. Remember: The key that is used is not necessarily the same as the Case Title designated property, although this is a common practice. 2. Add the property to the document type that is ingested. 3. Deploy the solution.

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From Administration Console for Content Platform Engine (ACCE), complete the following steps: 1. Select the object store in the domain navigation pane. We first define an event action before we create a subscription. In the Administration Console for Content Platform Engine, this allows the new subscription to use the newly created JavaScript Event action. 2. Create an event action by selecting object store Events, Actions, Processes Event Actions  New Event Action, as shown in Figure 11-1.

Figure 11-1 Adding a new event action

3. By using the wizard, add an event action. In the example, the display name is called Automated Case Document Filing Action. 4. In the next window in the wizard, select JavaScript as the event action type. 5. Paste the JavaScript code that is provided in Example 11-1 on page 417.

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Example 11-1 Sample JavaScript code

importPackage(java.io); importClass(java.lang.System); importClass(java.lang.Integer); importClass(java.util.Iterator); importClass(Packages.com.filenet.api.engine.EventActionHandler); importClass(Packages.com.filenet.api.util.Id); importPackage(Packages.com.filenet.api.events); importPackage(Packages.com.filenet.api.property); importPackage(Packages.com.filenet.api.exception); importPackage(Packages.com.filenet.api.core); importPackage(Packages.com.filenet.api.constants); importClass(Packages.com.filenet.api.query.SearchSQL); importClass(Packages.com.filenet.api.query.SearchScope); importClass(Packages.com.filenet.api.collection.IndependentObjectSet );

function onEvent(event, subscription) { // customize to some other string property symbolic name as needed var keyIdentifierName = "CC_CaseNumber"; var os = event.getObjectStore(); var id = event.get_SourceObjectId(); // get document's key identifier value var fe = new FilterElement(null, null, null, "Name " + keyIdentifierName, null); var pf = new PropertyFilter(); pf.addIncludeProperty(fe); var doc = Factory.Document.fetchInstance(os, id, pf); var identifier = doc.getProperties().get(keyIdentifierName).getStringValue(); // find case folder of same key identifier value var sqlStr = "SELECT [" + keyIdentifierName + "], [FolderName], [PathName], [Id] FROM [CmAcmCaseFolder] WHERE ([" + keyIdentifierName + "] = '" + identifier + "')"; var sql = new SearchSQL(sqlStr); var ss = new SearchScope(os); var objectSet = ss.fetchObjects(sql, new Integer(1), null, null); var iter = objectSet.iterator(); if (iter.hasNext()) {

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var folder = iter.next(); // file the doc and save var drcr = folder.file(doc, AutoUniqueName.AUTO_UNIQUE, doc.getProperties().getStringValue("Name"), DefineSecurityParentage.DO_NOT_DEFINE_SECURITY_PARENTAGE); drcr.save(RefreshMode.NO_REFRESH); } } 6. Create a subscription for the wanted document class or object by using the newly created event action. Complete the following steps: a. Identify and click the wanted document class or object for which you want to create a subscription. The example uses the Correspondence document type. b. From the Action menu, click New Subscription to add a subscription (see Figure 11-2) to this document class.

Figure 11-2 Adding a subscription to the Correspondence document class

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7. By using the wizard, enter a display name. In this example, the display name is Automatic Case Document Filing Subscription, as shown in Figure 11-3.

Figure 11-3 Creating a subscription

8. In the Select the Triggers window of the wizard, select the wanted triggers for the new subscription. In our example, select Creation Event, as shown in Figure 11-4 on page 420.

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Figure 11-4 Specify triggers window for creating a new subscription

9. In the Select an Event Action window of the wizard, choose the newly created event action and finish the wizard to complete the new subscription. Test your implementation by creating a document of the specified class. Make sure that the document is filed into the appropriate case folder. For more information about how to create a code module for automated document ingesting can be found at the IBM FileNet P8 Information Center, which is available at this website: http://pic.dhe.ibm.com/infocenter/p8docs/v5r2m0/topic/com.ibm.p8.ce.adm in.tasks.doc/p8pcc047.htm For more information about how to handle ingested documents through workflow, see 14.5, “Using Content Platform Engine workflow integration” on page 555.

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11.3 Splitting a case
There are instances in which you must split a single case into two separate cases. For example, in the Customer Complaints solution, a customer might file a complaint for a product defect and a service failure on the same complaint form or email. Based on company guidelines, these are two different types of complaints that must be resolved through two separate review processes. In this situation, the case worker must split the original case into two separate cases. Many of the details, such as customer name and the date when the complaint was filed, are the same for both cases. The Split Case page is designed for splitting cases. The Split Case page is started when the case worker clicks Split Case on the Case toolbar. When a case is split, a case is created that is based on information from the original case. Documents in the original case can be selectively moved to the new case. The new case can be of the same case type or a different type within the same solution. After the split, the two cases continue independently. The case history shows the split action and the other related case. This section describes how to split a case by using the Split Case page.

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11.3.1 Splitting a case into two cases
The Split Case window is opened by clicking Split Case in the Case Details page, as shown in Figure 11-5. If there are multiple case types in the solution, you can select the case type to be created from the split action.

Figure 11-5 Split Case window

The Split Case page contains the following widgets: Case toolbar: Displays header information. Split Case Data: Shows the case properties that can be edited for the new case. The properties fields are completed with matching values from the original case. Select Case Documents: Allows a user to select documents from the original case to be added to the new case. Original Case Data: Displays read-only property values from the original case. Tip: The property fields in the new case are completed with matching values from the original case. However, if the case has a property that has a default value and the current value of the property in the original case is NULL, the property is set to the default.

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Review the data that is presented for the new case, edit it if necessary, and then select the case documents to be added to the new case. After user confirmation, the split operation is completed, which copies the information to a new case instance. The new case and original case continue independently and complete separately. The tasks from the original case continue to run, and new tasks for the new case are started in the normal fashion. They function the same as though they were created through the Add Case function. If the user chooses to do so, selected documents are filed into new case at the case root level. The history of the original and the new case shows the split action and a link to the other case. Figure 11-6 shows the history of the split case activity for the example use case.

Figure 11-6 History of the case

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11.4 Basic customization scenarios
Disclaimer: IBM does not warrant, represent, or imply reliability, serviceability, or function of the code that is presented in association with this book. IBM is under no obligation to update content nor provide further support. All code is provided “as is,” with no warranties or guarantees whatsoever. In IBM Case Manager, there are various ways to customize a solution to add functionality by using custom code in the custom action or toolbar, code in the script adapter widget that is wired with preinstalled widgets, or with custom widgets. These can be considered as basic, intermediate, and advanced levels of customization to IBM Case Manager. This section focuses on the basic customization scenarios. The customization scenarios are provided as a subset of the many different ways to customize IBM Case Manager. Each customization scenario can be altered to achieve a different result and are provided as working examples. The following basic customization examples are shown in this section: Adding a button to the toolbar Adding custom actions to menu action

11.4.1 Adding a button to the toolbar
In this example, we add two new buttons to the toolbar. The first button opens a web page to the Toolbar widget. Complete the following steps: 1. From Case Manager Client, open Page Designer on the wanted page. 2. Edit the settings of the Toolbar widget on the page. 3. Click the Add button icon to show the Action and Alignment drop-down menus for a new button. For the Action drop-down menu, choose from Add Case, Custom Add Case Action, Event Action, Manage Roles, Open Web Page, Preferences, and Script Action. For the Alignment drop-down menu, choose from Left, Right, or Center. 4. In this example, we select Open Web Page as the action, Left as alignment, and enter http://ibm.com as the URL, as shown in Figure 11-7 on page 425.

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Figure 11-7 Adding a custom button to the toolbar

5. Click OK to add the new button to the toolbar. Then, click OK again to exit the Toolbar window and save the changes. 6. Commit and deploy the changes to the solution and validate the button in Case Manager Client.

11.4.2 Adding custom actions to menu action
We customize the menu action of the Case List widget in this example. The menu options for the Case List widget are called when the user right-clicks a case in the Case List widget. Complete the following steps to add an option to show a link to the case through a menu action in the Case List widget: 1. From Case Manager Builder, open Page Designer on the wanted page. 2. Edit the settings of the Case List widget on the page. In this example, we edit the settings of the Case List widget on the Cases page. 3. Click the Menu tab, and then click Add Menu Item. There are various actions that are available by default. For example, choosing Script Action allows a custom script to be run when the button or menu is selected.

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4. Select Script Action as the action. The window automatically fills with three other text areas: execute, show this script action, and enable this script action. 5. Copy and paste the script that is provided in Example 11-2 into the Execute section of the window. This script checks against the Case Title to see whether it matches with a variable set. In this script, we acquire the value of the case from the Case List widget by using this.getActionContext(“CaseReference”). Then, we perform a simple IF statement to check against the first element in the array that is given from the function call this.getActionContext(“CaseReference”).
Example 11-2 Sample script action

var x = this.getActionContext("CaseReference"); var c = "CC_Complaint_000000100001"; if(c == x[0].getCaseTitle()) { alert("This is a special case, please review this case."); } else { alert("This is a normal case, please proceed."); } 6. Click OK to add the menu item. Click OK again at the bottom of the Case List settings window to save the changes. 7. Commit and deploy the changes to the solution and validate the script in Case Manager Client.

11.5 Intermediate customization scenarios
There are various ways to customize an IBM Case Manager solution. This section focuses on the intermediate level of customization scenarios. This type of customization involves adding code in the script adapter widget that is wired with preinstalled widgets. The customization scenarios are provided as a subset of the many different ways to customize IBM Case Manager. Each customization scenario can be altered to achieve a different result and are provided as working examples.

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We show the following intermediate level of customization examples: Enumerating documents Opening multiple work items Adding entry template via custom action Adding an attachment to the case Creating in-basket dynamic filter Filtering Case Information widget to show comments only Modifying property attributes by using the Property Controller Getting the next work item with custom logic after completing a work item Filling the Case List widget based on search results

11.5.1 Enumerating documents
This customization scenario allows a user to enumerate the number of documents that are attached to a case by using the Script Adapter widget and wiring it to the Case List widget on the Cases page. We want the user to select a case in the Case List widget, for a pop-up window to show the number of documents, and show the document ID of each document in the root folder of the case. We want to use a script that gets the case folder ContentItem from the case editable object that is passed in the payload. Complete the following steps: 1. From Case Manager Builder, open Page Designer on the Cases page. 2. Drag the Script Adapter widget from the widget palette area to the main layout area. The location of the widget does not matter (whether it is in the hidden widget area or in a column on the page). 3. Click the Edit Settings icon of the Script Adapter widget and paste the code in Example 11-3 into the text area that is labeled JavaScript. Click OK to exit the window.
Example 11-3 Sample script for enumerating documents

var caseEditable = payload.caseEditable; var caseObj = caseEditable.getCase(); var caseFolder = caseObj.caseFolder; var actionsHandler = ecm.model.desktop.getActionsHandler(); if (actionsHandler) { actionsHandler.actionOpen(caseFolder, function(caseFolder, resultSet) { alert("The selected case folder has " + resultSet.items.length + " items."); for (var i = 0 ; i < resultSet.items.length; i ++) {

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console.log("Document ID : " + resultSet.items[i].id + "\n" + "Document Title: " + resultSet.items[i].name); alert("Document ID : " + resultSet.items[i].id + "\n" + "Document Title: " + resultSet.items[i].name ); } }); } return payload; 4. Click the Edit Wiring icon of the Script Adapter widget and wire it to the Case List widget to receive the Select Case outgoing event. Click Add Wire and then click OK to exit the window. 5. Save and close the Cases page, deploy the changes to the solution, and validate this customization scenario in Case Manager Client, as shown in Figure 11-8.

Figure 11-8 Viewing pop-up window from enumerating document sample

11.5.2 Opening multiple work items
In this customization scenario, the user can add a custom script to the Script Adapter widget to open multiple work items with multiple tabs in Case Manager Client. This opens multiple work items simultaneously in one action. The Script Adapter widget is wired to the In-baskets widget. Complete the following steps: 1. Within Case Manager Builder, open Page Designer on the Work page. 2. Click the Edit Settings icon in the In-baskets widget then click the Menu tab. 3. Click the Add Menu Item icon and select Event Action for the Action drop-down menu.

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4. Enter Open All for the Label field, open_all for the Menu Identifier field, open_all_event for the Event Name field, and select Broadcast as the Event Type, as shown in Figure 11-9.

Figure 11-9 Adding a menu action for the In-baskets widget

5. Click OK to add the new menu action for the In-baskets widget. Click OK to save the changes to the In-baskets widget. 6. Drag the Script Adapter widget from the widget palette area to the main layout area. Click the Edit Settings icon and paste the script that is shown in Example 11-4 on page 430 into the JavaScript text area. Then, click OK to save the changes to the Script Adapter widget. Tip: When possible, it is recommended that you add the Script Adapter to the hidden widgets page to avoid cluttering the page.

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Example 11-4 Sample script to open multiple work items

for (var i in payload.WorkItem){ var w = payload.WorkItem[i]; var h = new icm.util.WorkItemHandler(this, true); w.retrieveStep(function(workItem){ h.handleWorkItem(workItem); }); } 7. Click the Edit Wiring icon on the Script Adapter widget to wire the Script Adapter widget to the In-baskets widget. Select In-baskets as the source widget, select *open_all_event as the outgoing event, and select Receive event payload as the Incoming event. 8. Click Add Wire and then click OK to exit the window. 9. Save and close Page Designer and deploy the changes to the solution. To validate this customization scenario, click the first work item once and hold the Shift key to highlight the second work item in the In-baskets widget. Then, right-click either case and select Open All to open them in multiple tabs, as shown in Figure 11-10.

Figure 11-10 Opening multiple work items

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11.5.3 Adding entry template via custom action
This customization scenario allows the user to create a custom toolbar action to open an IBM Content Navigator action for an entry template. The entry template must be created beforehand and then the custom toolbar action starts the IBM Content Navigator action. Complete the following steps: 1. Create an entry template that uses FileNet Workplace XT by using the IBM FileNet Workplace XT Entry Template Designer. For more information about entry templates, see the IBM FileNet P8 Information Center at this website: http://pic.dhe.ibm.com/infocenter/p8docs/v5r1m0/index.jsp?topic=%2Fc om.ibm.usingeuc.doc%2Feuche013.htm 2. Copy the version series ID of the newly created entry template. 3. Within Case Manager Builder, open Page Designer on the Cases page. 4. Click the Edit Settings icon on the Toolbar widget and click the Add Button icon. 5. Select Script Action when you are clicking the drop-down menu for Action. Add the value Add Entry Template for the label field. 6. Paste the script that is in Example 11-5 on page 432 into the Execute text area. Make sure to replace the text in the first line with the version series ID of the newly created template. This script allows you to open a window to add an entry template that is started as an IBM Content Navigator action. The script calls the Navigator action through ecm.model.desktop.getActionsHandler(lang.hitch(this,function(actions Handler). We can display the entry template through the version series ID and the repository ID.

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Example 11-5 Sample script for opening an entry template

var entryTemplateId = "YOUR VERSION SERIES ID HERE"; var repositoryId = this.getWidget().getSolution().getTargetOS().id; require([ "dojo/_base/declare", "dojo/_base/lang" ], function( declare, lang ) { ecm.model.desktop.getActionsHandler(lang.hitch(this, function(actionsHandler) { var repository = ecm.model.desktop.getRepository(repositoryId); repository.retrieveItem(entryTemplateId, function(item) { if (item && item.mimetype) { switch (item.mimetype) { case "application/x-filenet-documententrytemplate": case "application/x-filenet-entrytemplate": actionsHandler.actionView(repository, [ item ]); break; } } }, "EntryTemplate", "current", entryTemplateId); })); }); 7. Click OK to add the button to the toolbar widget and then click OK to save the changes to the toolbar widget. 8. Save and close the page in Page Designer, then deploy the changes to the solution. To validate this customization scenario, click Add Entry Template to open a pop-up window to add the entry template, as shown in Figure 11-11 on page 433.

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Figure 11-11 Adding an entry template in Case Manager Client

11.5.4 Adding an attachment to the case
Often, a case worker wants to add an attachment to the case from the local system but does not want to browse to the repository each time to find the case folder. This customization scenario allows the case worker to add an attachment to file into the case without having to browse to the case folder in the Save in field for the Add Document window on the Work Details page. This customization scenario uses custom script in an event action in the Attachment widget. It also uses custom script in a Script Adapter widget.

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Note: If you are using the Customer Complaints solution, make sure that the appropriate step has an attachment added as part of the workflow. Complete the following steps: 1. From Case Manager Builder, open Page Designer on the Work Details page. 2. Click the Edit Settings icon for the Attachments widget on the page. 3. Click the Menus tab, then click the Add Menu Item icon. 4. Select Event Action under the Action drop-down menu. Then, enter the following values: – – – – Label: Add Document From Local File System Event Name: icm.AddDocToBothCaseAndAttachment Event Type: Wiring Enable this event action: Paste the script that is shown in Example 11-6.

Example 11-6 Sample script for Attachment widget event action

if (attachment && attachment.length > 0) { attachment = attachment[0]; } if ((attachment && (attachment.get("readOnly") == true)) || (!attachment)){ return false; }else{ return true; } 5. Click OK at the bottom of the form to add the new menu item. Click OK again to save the changes to the Attachments widget. 6. Drag the Script Adapter widget from the widget palette area to the main layout area. It is recommended to put this Script Adapter widget into the hidden widgets area. Click Show/Hide Hidden Widgets in the toolbar area of Page Designer to show the hidden widgets area. 7. Click the Edit Settings icon on the Script Adapter widget. 8. Select the Block outbound event option.

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9. Paste the custom script that is shown in Example 11-7 into the JavaScript text area. This custom script uses the Add Document dialog, retrieves the case folder, and makes it as the parent folder of the Add Document dialog. It also hides the Save in field that is present in the Add File from Add Document dialog.
Example 11-7 Sample custom script for adding an attachment

var self = this; /*Wire to page container icm.SendWorkItem event, retrieve the workitem related case.*/ if(payload.eventName == "icm.SendWorkItem"){ self.workItemEdt = payload.workItemEditable; self.workItemEdt.retrieveStep(function(){ self.case = self.workItemEdt.getCase(); }); } /*Wire to event action on attachment, which published the user configured event icm.AddDocToBothCaseAndAttachment*/ if(payload.eventName == "icm.AddDocToBothCaseAndAttachment"){ /*Get the selected attachment sent from event action*/ self.attachment = payload.Attachment; /*Callback to add case document as attachment*/ var _addToAttachment = function(contentItem){ self.onPublishEvent("icm.SendEventPayload", {"attachmentName":self.attachment.id, "documents":[contentItem]}); }; /*retrieve the case folder, make it as the parent folder of the add document dialog*/ self.case.retrieveCaseFolder(function(){ var parentFolder = self.case.getCaseFolder(); require(["dojo/dom-style", "ecm/widget/dialog/AddContentItemDialog"],function(domStyle, AddContentItemDialog){ /*Create the add document dialog*/ self.addContentItemDialog = new AddContentItemDialog(); var contentItemGeneralPane = self.addContentItemDialog.addContentItemGeneralPane; /*Hide the "Save in" field - ICM requirement*/

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domStyle.set(contentItemGeneralPane._documentOnlyArea, "display", "none"); /*Show the add document dialog*/ self.addContentItemDialog.show(parentFolder.repository, parentFolder, true, false, _addToAttachment, null, false, null, true); }); }); } 10.Click OK in the Script Adapter widget. Then, click the Edit Wiring icon on the Script Adapter widget. 11.Under the section that is labeled Incoming Events for the Script Adapter, specify the following values under each drop-down menu: – Source widget: Page Container – Outgoing event: Send work item – Incoming event: Receive event payload 12.Click Add Wire. 13.Specify a second incoming event for the Script Adapter with the following values: – Source widget: Attachments – Outgoing event: *icm.AddDocToBothCaseAndAttachment – Incoming Event: Receive event payload 14.Click Add Wire. 15.Under the section that is called Outgoing Events for the Script Adapter, specify the following values under each drop-down menu: – Outgoing event: Send event payload – Target widget: Attachments – Incoming event: Add document attachment 16.Click Add Wire. Then, click OK to save the changes to the wiring for the Script Adapter widget. 17.Save the changes to the page, deploy the changes in Case Manager Builder, and open Case Manager Client to validate the customization scenario. 18.On the Work Details page, browse to the Attachments widget, click Actions, and then select the newly created menu item, Add Document From Local File System. The window that opens after you click the menu item does not require the user to specify where to save the attachment. The attachment is automatically saved to the case folder.

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11.5.5 Creating in-basket dynamic filter
This customization scenario adds an in-basket dynamic filter. The in-basket widget loads when the dynamic filter is received so that the results that are shown in the in-basket widget already are filtered to the case worker. Complete the following steps: 1. From Case Manager Builder, open Page Designer on the Work page. 2. Drag the Script Adapter widget from the widget palette area to the main layout area. 3. Wire the Script Adapter widget to the Page Container widget under the Incoming Events section by setting the following values: – Source widget: Page Container – Outgoing event: Page Activated – Incoming event: Receive event payload Click Add Wire to add this wiring setting. 4. Wire the Script Adapter widget to the Page Container widget under the Outgoing Events section by setting the following values: – Outgoing Event: Send event payload – Target widget: In-baskets – Incoming event: Apply filter Click Add Wire to add this wiring setting. 5. Validate that the In-basket widget is wired appropriately. 6. Click the Edit Settings icon for the Script Adapter widget and paste the script that is shown in Example 11-8 on page 438 into the JavaScript text area. The following script grabs the current user name and constructs variables to pass to the icm.model.InbasketDynamicFilter.fromJSON(data); function to perform the dynamic filter. Note: The script that is shown in Example 11-8 on page 438 is specific to the Customer Complaints solution. Make sure to create a case property for the Customer Complaints solution that is called AssignedToUser. The in-basket dynamic filter searches on this case property and matches it to the user name, which is case-sensitive.

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Example 11-8 Sample script for in-basket dynamic filter

var myUser = ecm.model.desktop.userDisplayName; var data = { "queueName":"CC_Specialist", "inbasketName":"Specialist", "hideFilterUI":false, "queryFilter":"(CC_AssignedToUser = :A)", "queryFields":[ { "name":"CC_AssignedToUser", "type":"xs:string", "value":"*" } ], "hideLockedByOther":"true" }; data.queryFields[0].value = myUser; var model = icm.model.InbasketDynamicFilter.fromJSON(data); console.log(model); var modelArray = []; modelArray.push(model); return {"dynamicFilters":modelArray}; 7. Click the Edit Settings icon for the In-baskets widget and select the Do not populate the in-basket until the dynamic filter is received option. This ensures that the in-basket widget loads only when the filter is received. 8. Save and close the changes to the page within Page Designer. Ensure that the newly created case property AssignedToUser is available to the case type and the Specialist in-basket. 9. To validate this customization scenario, create a case and enter P8Admin if you are logged in as P8Admin for the case property AssignedToUser on the Work Page in Case Manager Client. Ensure that the case is opened to the Specialist queue and it appears in the in-basket widget on Case Manager Client. In Figure 11-12 on page 439, there are three work items in the Specialist queue, but only one is available because it has the value P8Admin, which matches the logged in user.

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Figure 11-12 In-basket widget dynamic filter

11.5.6 Filtering Case Information widget to show comments only
This customization scenario allows the Case Information widget to show only comments that are attached to the case. This helps to filter down the History tab of the Case Information widget. Complete the following steps: 1. From Case Manager Builder, open Page Designer for a page or a custom page with the Case List widget. In this example, we customize the Cases page. 2. Drag the Script Adapter widget from the widget palette area to the main layout area. 3. Wire the Script Adapter widget to the Page Container widget under the Incoming Events section by setting the following values: – Source widget: Page Container – Outgoing event: Page Opened – Incoming event: Receive event payload Click Add Wire to add this wiring setting. 4. Wire the Script Adapter widget to the Page Container widget under the Outgoing Events section by setting the following values: – Outgoing Event: Send event payload – Target widget: Case Information – Incoming event: Filter History Click Add Wire to add this wiring setting.

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5. Click the Edit Settings icon for the Script Adapter widget. Paste the code that is shown in Example 11-9 into the JavaScript text area. This script filters the payload of the Case Information widget to show only case comments.
Example 11-9 Sample script to show comments only

payload = {"show":"Summary", "showValue":"Summary", "forEntry":"Comments", "forValue":"Comments"}; return payload; 6. Save the changes to the page, deploy the changes to the solution, and open Case Manager Client to the page with the Case List widget. In this example, we open the Cases page and click a case in the Case List widget. The History tab of the Case Information widget shows the comments of the case.

11.5.7 Modifying property attributes by using the Property Controller
This customization scenario involves hiding or showing certain case properties, depending on what the user selects in a choice list case property. This scenario demonstrates how to adjust the PropertyController settings in the context of the Coordination topic. When the page broadcasts a SendCaseInfo event, for example, each widget begins the process of loading their widget content. This loading is asynchronous and can take longer for some widgets, such as the Form widget. In the case of data widgets, such as the Properties, Form, Attachments widgets, one widget can complete the loading process and prepare for user input before another. Therefore, the user can begin interacting with that widget’s user interface while the other widgets are still loading. Because all of these widgets share a controller instance, it becomes difficult to ascertain the controller’s initial state when testing for dirty state. The LOADWIDGET and AFTERLOADWIDGET topics were introduced to coordinate the loading process so that all widgets can be certain of the moment when the loading process was complete by all data widgets. Important: This customization scenario and the LOADWIDGET and AFTERLOADWIDGET topics are not available in IBM Case Manager V5.2. It is available in IBM Case Manager V5.2.0.001. Specifically, the LOADWIDGET topic indicates that a widget can begin loading its content. The completion callback is called when the loading process is complete. The Properties widget responds to this topic by loading the widget in a read-only state to temporarily prevent user input.

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After all of the widgets respond to the LOADWIDGET topic, then the AFTERLOADWIDGET topic is triggered. Its payload includes a time stamp that indicates the moment when all data widgets were loaded. The Properties widget responds to this topic by switching the view to an editable state to allow user input. The following customization scenario shows how coordination topics can be used to customize some of the controller while the page is loaded: 1. Open the Case Details page in Page Designer. 2. Drag the Script Adapter widget from the widget palette area to the main layout area or the hidden widgets area. 3. Wire the Script Adapter to the Send case information event from the Page Container widget. 4. Click the Edit Settings icon for the Script Adapter widget and paste the custom script that is shown in Example 11-10 into the JavaScript text area. This custom script uses the Property Controller to detect if the user changed the Upgrade Category case property value to Product or Service Plan on the Case Details page. If the user selects Product, the Part Number case property becomes required and the Customer Since case property is hidden. If the user selects Service Plan, the Customer Since case property becomes required and the Part Number case property is hidden. IBM Case Manager V5.2.0.001 adds the LOADWIDGET and AFTERLOADWIDGET topics that allows the coordination events to be run.
Example 11-10 Sample custom script for modifying property attributes

require(["icm/base/Constants", "icm/model/properties/controller/ControllerManager"], function(Constants, ControllerManager) { var coordination = payload.coordination; var editable = payload.caseEditable; var collectionController; var upgradePropertyController; var productPropertyController; var servicePropertyController; var handle; /* Define the value change handler for the CC_UpgradeCategory property. This handler updates the state of the CC_PartNumber and CC_CustomerSince properties each time the value of the CC_UpgradeCategory property changes. */

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var upgradeMethodValueChangedHandler = function(upgradeMethodValue) { productPropertyController.set("hidden", upgradeMethodValue !== "Product"); productPropertyController.set("required", upgradeMethodValue === "Product"); servicePropertyController.set("hidden", upgradeMethodValue !== "Service Plan"); servicePropertyController.set("required", upgradeMethodValue === "Service Plan"); }; /* Define the handler for the LOADWIDGET topic. */ var loadTopicHandler = function(context, complete, abort) { /* Create the controller binding. */ collectionController = ControllerManager.bind(editable); upgradePropertyController = collectionController.getPropertyController("CC_UpgradeCategory"); productPropertyController = collectionController.getPropertyController("CC_PartNumber"); servicePropertyController = collectionController.getPropertyController("CC_CustomerSince"); /* Wire up the value changed handler for the CC_UpdateCategory property. */ handle = upgradePropertyController.watch("value", upgradeMethodValueChangedHandler); /* Call the value changed handler directly to update the initial state of the CC_PartNumber and CC_CustomerSince properties based on the current value of the CC_UpgradeCategory property. */ upgradeMethodValueChangedHandler(upgradePropertyController.get("valu e")); /* Call the coordination completion method. */ complete(); }; /* Define the handler for the AFTERSAVE and AFTERCANCEL topics. */ var closeTopicHandler = function(context, complete, abort) { /* Release the value changed handler. */

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handle.remove(); /* Release the controller binding. */ ControllerManager.unbind(editable); /* Call the coordination completion method. */ complete(); }; /* Wire up the coordination topic handlers. */ coordination.participate(Constants.CoordTopic.LOADWIDGET, loadTopicHandler); coordination.participate(Constants.CoordTopic.AFTERSAVE, closeTopicHandler); coordination.participate(Constants.CoordTopic.AFTERCANCEL, closeTopicHandler); }); 5. Save the changes to the page and deploy the changes to the solution. To validate this customization scenario in Case Manager Client, open the Case Details page and notice that the Customer Since field is hidden and the Part Number field is required when Product is selected in the Upgrade Category field. Similarly, notice that the Part Number field is hidden and the Customer Since field is required when Service Plan is selected in the Upgrade Category field. Note: This customization scenario can be modified to be added to the Work Details page, Add Cases page, or Add New Task page. The wiring and the custom script must be modified accordingly.

11.5.8 Getting the next work item with custom logic after completing a work item
This customization scenario allows the user to complete a work item, then have some custom logic to retrieve the next work item automatically. The custom logic in this specific example retrieves the next work item that has the same step name as the one that was opened from the In-baskets widget. This customization scenario uses the get next option that is available in the Work Item Toolbar widget’s Complete action. The Complete action in the Work Item Toolbar widget can be enabled to automatically get the next work item. This retrieves the next work item when the case worker clicks Complete.

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This customization (as shown in Figure 11-13) extends this standard feature in IBM Case Manager and adds custom logic.

Figure 11-13 Work Item Toolbar widget’s Complete action

For the Customer Complaints solution, if a case worker is of the Specialist Role and opens the only Review Product Compliant work item in the work queue and the rest of the work items in the queue for the Specialist role are Review Non-Product Compliant work items, the work details page notifies the case worker that there are no more work items to retrieve. Complete the following steps to customize the solution: 1. Open the page or custom Work Details page in Page Designer. In this example, we use the Work Details page. 2. Open the Edit Wiring window and select the Page Container widget. Click the Event Broadcasting tab and clear the Send work item. This ensures that the custom script we add in later broadcasts this event, instead of the page.

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3. Click the Edit Settings icon on the Work Item Toolbar widget. Click the Toolbar tab and double-click the Complete toolbar label to edit it. 4. Select the Automatically get the next work item option. This enables the Complete button on the work details page to retrieve the next work item. Click OK to save the changes to the Complete button, then click OK again to save the changes to the Work Item Toolbar. 5. Drag the Script Adapter widget from the widget palette area to the main layout area. 6. Click the Edit Settings icon on the Script Adapter widget and paste the script that is shown in Example 11-11 into the JavaScript text area. This script is a sample that requires the next work item to have the same step name as the first work item that was opened from the In-baskets widget directly. This can be changed or modified if you want to retrieve the next work item by using different criteria.
Example 11-11 Sample script to process a work item

var widget = this; require([ "dojo/_base/declare", "dojo/_base/lang", "icm/util/WorkItemHandler", ], function( declare, lang, WorkItemHandler ) { if(payload !== null){ var workItemEditable = payload.workItemEditable; var UIState = payload.UIState; if ( workItemEditable !== null) { /*If the current work item is not gotten from get next function, just show it*/ var stepName = workItemEditable.getStepName(); if(UIState !== null && UIState.get("GetNext") === true){ /*do any rules based on business logic*/ if ( widget.lastWorkItemStepName && stepName !== widget.lastWorkItemStepName){ /* if the work item is not expected. We always need to handle the work item with same stepName for handling */ var icmWorkitem = workItemEditable.getWorkItem();

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if(UIState !== null && UIState.get("workItemReadOnly") !== true){ icmWorkitem.abortStep(lang.hitch(this, function(){ var handler = new WorkItemHandler(widget); handler.handleNextWorkItem(icmWorkitem); })); }else{ var handler = new WorkItemHandler(widget); handler.handleNextWorkItem(icmWorkitem); } }else{ widget.lastWorkItemStepName = stepName; widget.onBroadcastEvent("icm.SendWorkItem", payload); } }else{ widget.lastWorkItemStepName = stepName; widget.onBroadcastEvent("icm.SendWorkItem", payload); } } } }); return null; 7. Click the Edit Wiring icon on the Script Adapter widget and enter the following values under the section that is labeled Incoming Events for the Script Adapter: – Source widget: Page Container – Outgoing event: Send work item – Incoming event: Receive event payload 8. Click OK to save the changes to the Script Adapter widget. 9. Save the changes to the page, deploy the changes to the solution, and open Case Manager Client to validate this customization scenario. To validate, open a work item directly from the In-baskets widget to view the work item on the Work Details page. Then, complete the work item and notice that the next work item with the same step name comes up automatically. When there are no more work items with the same name in the In-baskets widget, a window opens.

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11.5.9 Filling the Case List widget based on search results
This customization scenario allows the user to automatically complete the Case List widget with a list of cases that is based on search results. This allows the user to load a page with the Case List widget that already contains the cases that are relevant to the user. This customization scenario can be added to a custom page so that a case worker has the cases already preinstalled that are based on the customer state and sorted by the complaint received date. Complete the following steps: 1. Open the page or custom page with the Case List widget in Page Designer. In this example, we use the Cases page. 2. Drag the Script Adapter widget onto the page. 3. Click the Edit Wiring icon for the Script Adapter widget. 4. Under the Incoming Events section, make the following selections: – Source widget: Page Container – Outgoing event: Page opened – Incoming event: Receive event payload Click Add Wire to add the wiring. 5. Under the Outgoing Events section, make the following selections: – Outgoing event: Send event payload – Target widget: Case List – Incoming event: Search cases Click Add Wire to add the wiring. 6. Click the Edit Settings icon for the Script Adapter widget and paste the script that is shown in Example 11-12 on page 448 into the JavaScript text area. This script creates a case search that filters on cases by the customer state field, removes that field from the Case List view, and sorts the result by the complaint received date. This is done by using the utility class of icm.util.SearchPayload that can be referenced in the IBM Case Manager JavaScript API reference documentation.

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Example 11-12 Sample custom case list script

var solution = this.solution; var params = {}; var self = this; var caseType = solution.getPrefix() +"_Complaint"; var complaintReceivedAttrId = solution.getPrefix() +"_ComplaintReceivedDate"; var customerStateAttrId = solution.getPrefix() +"_CustomerState"; var customerStateAttrDisplayName = "Customer State"; require(["icm/util/SearchPayload"],function(SearchPayload){ solution.retrieveCaseTypes(function(){

solution.retrieveAttributeDefinitions(function(attributesDef) { var searchPayload = new SearchPayload(); searchPayload.attributeDefinitions = attributesDef; params.ObjectStore = solution.getTargetOS().id; var criterion = new ecm.model.SearchCriterion({"id": customerStateAttrId, "name":customerStateAttrDisplayName, "selectedOperator": "NOTIN", "dataType": "xs:string","defaultValue" : "Completed", "value": "Completed", "values": ["Completed"]}); params.criterions = [criterion]; params.CaseType = caseType; params.solution = solution; var searchPayload = new SearchPayload(); searchPayload.setModel(params); var var var for i++) { property = payload.detailsViewProperties[i]; if(property.symbolicName !== customerStateAttrId ){ newdvprops.push(property); } } payload = searchPayload.getSearchPayload(); property; newdvprops = []; (var i=0; i

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