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African Americans During the Civil Rights Movement

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Submitted By Destiny313232
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African Americans during the Civil Rights Movement
Destiny McClenningham
Anderson University

Introduction:
“Vulnerable Populations” are subgroups who possess specific characteristics that distinguish them from others in the population (Jansson, 2005).The group I choice to focus on was African Americans. African or black Americans are define is an ethnic group of citizens or residents of the United States with total or partial ancestry from any of the native populations of Sub-Saharan Africa(Foner & Garraty,1991). The time I choice to focus on with my group was the civil rights movement. This era play a key role in African American history. What is the African American history leading up to this time? What was going on during this era? What social policy was affected during this time?
History:
There was a lot of history leading up to the civil rights movement. In the late 1950s and 1960s there was an increase in racial violence and protests in the South(Jansson). A 100 years after the Emancipation Proclamation African Americans in the South still inhabited a unequal world(Foner & Garraty). “Jim Crow” laws at the local state levels barred them from businesses, schools, public bathrooms, transportations, and theaters from juried and legislatures(Foner & Garraty). In 1954 the U.S. Supreme Court shut down the “separate but equal” doctrine that formed the basis for state-sanctioned discrimination(Foner & Garraty). This event draw national and international attention to African Americans’ plight. Large segments of the populace-particularly African Americans, women, and men without property have not always been accorded full citizenship rights in the American Republic, civil rights movements, or “freedom struggles” have been a frequent feature of the nation’s history ( Foner & Garraty). Movements to obtain civil rights for black…...

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