Agricultural Subsidies and Development

In: Business and Management

Submitted By agat007
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1. What philosophical principle did Google’s managers adopt when deciding that the benefits of operating in China outweighed the costs?
When it comes to the benefits outweighing the cost in China from a layman perspective, one could easily say that there is no philosophical principle was adopted, but rather, common sense led them to China. Even though China may have censorship everywhere, the Chinese don't have as many regulations as they do in America or other developed nations. Workers in China earn way less and work longer hours. Google is able to buy property for less in China, too. If anything, Google actually gained money by establishing a branch in China. On the contrary, one could also say that Google’s managers adopt utilitarian approach, because according to utilitarian philosophy, “it focuses attention on the need to weigh carefully all of the social benefits and costs of a business action and to pursue only those actions where the benefits outweigh the costs” (Hill, 2009, p. 144). For Google, they have their own legitimate and logical reasons why they should keep Google’s with the censorship by Chinese government. Without a doubt, China is a huge promising and potential Internet market in the world, where Google can make a great number of profits. Also, Google top managers explain that it’s better to give Chinese users limited information than to give nothing. What’s more, Google managers argue that Google is the only searching engine in China telling users that their searching has been censored because of the government regulations (Hill 8E, p.154), and the truth be told, Google will need China before China will need Google.
Furthermore, Google’s objective is to allow people to access all of the information in the world, and in order to enter Chinese market, Google has no other choice but to follow Chinese regulations, which pave way for some political…...

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