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Ahimsa on Hinduism, Jainism and Zen Budhhism : a Synthesis

In: Philosophy and Psychology

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Among some of the world’s greatest religions there exists a wide variety of views, beliefs and doctrines that act in unique support of each system. And while there are many differences amongst these structures, there are often many similarities that can be found as well. Thus, understanding differences and similarities of its principles is important. Principles of Hinduism, Jainism, and Zen Buddhism are adopted in a person’s life at different stages of personal development. It enlightens once life and gives some perspectives about the right and ethical way of living. Just like nonviolence- a teaching that started since the time of Christ, were all these teachings have in common. Nonviolence, simply known as Ahimsa, is the first and foremost ethical principle of Hinduism. It is gentleness and nonviolence, whether physical, mental or emotional. It is abstaining from causing hurt or harm to all beings. To the Hindu everything is sacred that life is a pilgrimage to liberation from rebirth, and no violence can be carried to the higher reaches of that ascent.
The whole was contained in the part, and the part in the whole. Based on this cognition, they taught a philosophy of non-difference of self or the unity of all being and others, analyses that we are not separated from the world and its manifestation forms nor from the Divine which shines in all things and all peoples or simply we call it the oneness of all being. From this understanding of oneness arose the philosophical basis for the practice of not harming others and the commitment of all Hindus to it.

Hindus believe in the existence of God is everywhere, as an all-pervasive, self-effulgent energy and consciousness. This basic belief creates the attitude of sublime tolerance and acceptance toward others. Even tolerance is insufficient to describe the compassion and reverence the Hindu holds for the…...

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