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Air China

In: Business and Management

Submitted By moein8989
Words 329
Pages 2
Air China's mission is to meet customers' demand and to create mutual value * As a business entity, Air China’s operational goal is to have economic benefits at the core and to realize the maximization of profits. However, to achieve this goal, it is important for us to create a variety of values by means of accommodating the increasing demands of customers, which demonstrates the social responsibility of Air China as an internationally recognized airline. * To meet customers’ demands is the priority and fundamental mission of Air China. Customer service is the most important product that we provide. Satisfying the customer comes before the shareholders, the company and the employees. * To create mutual value demonstrates the idea of value sharing and benefit sharing of Air China as a public company and a modern enterprise. Mutual value means the value that should be shared by shareholders, enterprises, employees, customers and the society as a whole. * Air China is a stakeholder for shareholders, enterprises, employees, customers and the society. The majority shareholder of Air China is the government, and other investors make up the remaining shareholders. Air China will make unremitting efforts to ensure an attractive return to shareholders, give momentum to Air China, have a sustainable and healthy development, assure satisfactory salaries, benefits and welfare to employees, offer excellent services to customers and bring positive benefits and returns to the society. * Employees are Air China’s most valuable resources and they are treasured by the company. While adhering to the people-oriented management philosophy, Air China will assume the primary responsibility of caring for the life, work and growth of their employees. In addition to the importance of employees’ benefits and welfare, a new initiative will be established to help employees...

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