Aldol

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Submitted By arletty07
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Procedures:

Step | Procedure | Observations | 1 | Mix 0.025 mol benzaldehyde with the theoretical quantity of acetone in a 100 mL beaker. | The solution had a strong smell, and clear color. | 2 | Make a solution of 2.5 g of sodium hydroxide dissolved in a 25 mL of water and 20 mL of ethanol in a 250 mL beaker. | The three solutions were added together, strong smell and clear color as well. | 3 | Add one-half the benzaldehyde-acetone mixture to the ethanolic NaOH solution and mix well w/ a stirring rod. | The solution turned yellow immediately, with some precipitations. | 4 | After 10-15 min add the remainder of the aldehyde-ketone mixture and rinse the beaker with a little ethanol. | After 10 min the solution left was added but no change occurred. | 5 | Stir the mixture frequently for 30 min and then collect the product by vacuum filtration on a Buchner funnel. | Mixture was stirred for 30 min, then transferred into the B. funnel. | 6 | Release the vacuum and carefully pour
50 mL of water on the product to wash it.
Reapply the vacuum and repeat this process 3 times. | Product was washed 3 time with water without releasing the vacuum. | 7 | Finally press the product as dry as possible on the filter using cork or 50 mL beaker, then press it between sheets of filter paper ( Save sample for mpt.) | A filter paper was placed on top of the crystals and a 50 ml beaker was placed on top of paper and pressed down. | 8 | Recrystallize the rest of the product using 5 mL of ethanol for each 4 g dibenzalacetone. | 4 mL of ethanol was added to the solution. | 9 | Add the product dissolve in hot ethanol then cool to room temp. Place it in ice bath (the yield after recrystallization should be about 2 g) | The product was added to the hot ethanol after it was completely dissolved was placed inside ice bath. | 10 | Perform…...

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