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American Capitalism and American Democracy

In: Historical Events

Submitted By demar
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American Capitalism and American Democracy have always gone hand in hand for the entire history of the United States since it's founding, and many say one cannot exist without the other. Many people today commonly associate Capitalism with Democracy when asked about the United States in general. But this statement is inherently flawed; capitalism is based on profits for the few while democracy is based on rights for many.
Cities have been in existence for several thousand years, as much as seven thousand by some accounts (Henslin, 2006). They usually are built near transportation routes or areas rich in natural resources. They can only exist as long as there is the means for producing surplus food and other necessary supplies. Cities grow at different rates and for different reasons and there are different types of cities, or urban centers. Metropolis, megalopolis, and megacity are terms used to classify cities by size.
An understanding of the beginning of common schooling in the United States requires attention to such social changes as urbanization, early industrialization, and patterns of immigration, all in the northeastern United States. Ideologically, the common school era was rooted in classical liberalism, which had practical consequences in urban New England different from those in rural Jeffersonian Virginia. These variations were due to differences in regional political economy as well as shifts in religious thought. While Jefferson had encountered difficulty gaining consensus for a state-funded but locally controlled school system, Horace Mann sought a state-funded and state-controlled school system. In part because of the contrasts in political economy between Massachusetts and Virginia, and in part because of differences between the paternalistic Whig liberalism of urban Massachusetts and the more laissez-faire liberalism of agrarian Virginia, Mann…...

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