American Criminal Court System

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Words 1147
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American Criminal Court System
Kabie Goss
CJA/224
July 14, 2014
Samyra Hicks

American Criminal Court System
When thinking about the American Criminal Court System, there is a lot to think about. Most cases are not just opened and closed in one day like they are on television, and there are different courts to handle different situations. In this paper I will be describing what a court is and its purpose, as well as defining what the dual court system is. I will also describe the role that early codes, common law, and precedent played in the development of courts. Lastly, I will identify the role of the courts in criminal justice today. Court and its Purpose Merriam-Webster defines a court in three different ways, but they all seem to intertwine. The first definition is; “a formal legal meeting in which evidence about crimes, disagreements, etc., is presented to a judge and often a jury so that decisions can be made according to the law.” The second being, “a place where legal cases are heard.” The third definition states, “An official group of people (such as a judge and jury) who listen to evidence and make decisions about legal cases.” There are many different types of courts at the local, state, and federal level. Courts can hear both civil and criminal cases.
The purpose of the court is to settle legal disputes whether civil or criminal, through a legal process, while protecting the rights and liberties of everyone involved, and to administer justice fairly. The court hears testimony from each side before rendering a verdict. Dual Court System
The United States has what is called a dual court system. This system is what separates a state court from a federal court. “A dual court system is a legal organizational structure that supports two contemporaneous court systems: usually one at a local level, and one at a national level” (What is…...

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