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An Epidemic in South Africa

In: Social Issues

Submitted By enhive
Words 2331
Pages 10
Engl-101-93
30 March 2008
An Epidemic in South Africa
He’s sitting down on a log with his hands on his face; feeling empty and full of pain. He’s in a small village in South Africa and all he can hear around him is weeping and crying; he and his sister will most likely not attend school anymore. The lifeless corpse being buried is his aunt; he and his younger sister had lived with her, unfortunately she died from HIV. His Mother also died of HIV two weeks before his aunt had passed, and his father abandoned him and his sister. He and his sister are now left with no relatives; fortunately, they will be living with a friend and his mother. This tragic story is just an example of the pain and despair some children have to go through in Africa. This chaos occurs throughout Sub-Saharan Africa. Millions of children in Africa everyday are being born with HIV and as a result, many children lose their parents or relatives. Each child knows that their life is limited and eventually they will die sooner or later. Although the HIV epidemic is spreading, some programs like UNAIDS were established to assist the worldwide fight against Aids. Many people have to take medication and live with this burden for the rest of their life. The spread of Aids in Africa has become an epidemic due to its progression and continuous spread despite the help, HIV has affected South Africa society and economy severely, and the epidemic continues to spread in South Africa due to the Governments lack of attention and misinformed people.
Many people are unaware of the true facts about the virus and its reality. Aids is an acquired immune deficiency syndrome, which is a Retrovirus. This condition severely weakens the immune system. It becomes so weak and damaged that it becomes unable to fight off any infections. Imagine having no hands and having to box, that is basically what happens to the...

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