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An Essay on Liberation

In: Philosophy and Psychology

Submitted By nflman2117
Words 1161
Pages 5
Emmanuel Manolidis
Existentialism
Professor Bearn

An Essay on An Essay on Liberation

Marcuse begins his work, An Essay on Liberation, with a critique on the current system, capitalism. He describes the competition that goes on in today’s capitalist society as “aggressiveness, brutality, and ugliness,” and even calls it “debilitating competition.” (Marcuse, pg 5) He believes that this system does not work. Marcuse believes that capitalism’s competition is too much for humans to handle and that it creates a society driven by consumption. While I agree that consumerism is not good for people, I believe that Marcuse’s views on competition are wrong. Genuine friendly competition was one of the core values of ancient Greek society. The Greeks would evaluate themselves, and then try to become better than those who were better than themselves. Whether it was by physical training or by reading, each Greek was constantly striving to educate himself and to strengthen his body. Competition is what pushes people to improve and is one of the two best things to come out of the capitalist system (the other being lower prices). People are born with different abilities, and capitalism allows them to use their talents to succeed. Competition creates a world of motivated people who produce the best goods and services that they can. In a free capitalist society, anyone can achieve what he wants if he works hard enough. Here, ability and effort come together and allows people to succeed. The satisfaction that comes from accomplishing something after hard work is something that can never exist in a society where everyone is “equal.” The benefits of competition can best be seen in sports, where being the best is everything. Tracy McGrady was one of the most talented people to ever play the game of basketball, but he lacked the competitive drive to work hard....

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