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Anthro Terms

In: Philosophy and Psychology

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Anthropology
Unit 1 – online
Anthropology is the study of humans, past and present.
There are 4 areas of Anthropology-
1. sociocultural - examine social patterns and practices across cultures, with a special interest in how people live in particular places and how they organize, govern, and create meaning
2. , biological/physical - seek to understand how humans adapt to diverse environments, how biological and cultural processes work together to shape growth, development and behavior, and what causes disease and early death
3. archaeology - study past peoples and cultures, from the deepest prehistory to the recent past, through the analysis of material remains, ranging from artifacts and evidence of past environments to architecture and landscapes
4. linguistics- is the comparative study of ways in which language reflects and influences social life
Unit 1 – Book
Anthropology – the study of humankind in all times and places
Colonialism – when one nation dominates another through occupation, admin (military) and control of resource’s.
Cultural imperialism – refers to the promotion of one nation’s values, beliefs, and behavior above those of all others.
Most famous empiricist – Franz Boas (1858-1942) he rejected racism and saw everyone as equal
Radcliffe Brown – focused on how culture worked as a whole to maintain itself
Malinowski – paid attention to his key informants’ point of view (groundbreaking methodology)
Influences on Canadian Anthro – museums, academic department, applied research
Diamond Jenness – page 7 epic winter story, survived on island (Karluk)
Davidson Black –, Zhoukoudian cave, fossils, fossils sunk by the Chinese
Marious Barbeau – considered a pioneer, founder of Canadian folklore studies,
Regna Darnell - linguistics, fluent in cree, slavery and Mohawk. Ontario based

Figure 1.1 page 9 shows the subfields of Anthropology…...

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