Anti-Fraud

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The IUCN Anti-Fraud Policy
February 2008 – Version 1.0

Office of the Director General

The World Conservation Union Rue Mauverney 28 1196 Gland, Switzerland Tel: +41 22 999 0296 Fax: +41 22 999 0029 www.iucn.org

Policy Version Control and Document History: The IUCN Anti-Fraud Policy Title Version Source language Published in French under the title Published in Spanish under the title Responsible Unit Developed by Subject (Taxonomy) Date approved Approved by Applicable to Purpose IUCN Anti – Fraud Policy 1.0 released February 2008 English Politique de l’UICN de lutte contre la fraude Política para la Prevención de Fraudes de la UICN Office of the Director General IUCN Oversight Unit Fraud, Internal Control, Risk Management November 2007 Director General and Global Management Team All IUCN Staff Members world-wide The aim of the IUCN Anti-Fraud Policy is to safeguard the reputation and financial viability of IUCN through improved management of fraud risk. It sets out explicit steps to be taken in response to reported or suspected fraud, as well as measures that will be taken to prevent or minimize the risk of fraud. IUCN Internal Control Policy Framework COSO Standards IUCN Code of Conduct and Professional Ethics for the Secretariat Sent to all staff members world-wide, available on the IUCN Knowledge Network (intranet), provided for information to all partner organizations and suppliers with contracts with IUCN, and available publicly on request.

Is part of Conforms to Related Documents Distribution

Document History Version 1.0 Released February 2008

For further information contact: IUCN Oversight Unit ++ 41 22 999 0271 or Reception ++ 41 22 999 0001

IUCN Anti-Fraud Policy

Page 2 of 18

Version 1.0 / February 2008

Table of Contents…...

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