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Antibiotic Resistance

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Antibiotic Resistance Essay
Many things were learned while completing this study. I learned that education is one of the keys to reducing the amount of antibiotic resistance. Educating parents who insist on getting antibiotics for every sniffle on the danger of over medicating with antibiotics might help. Educating the general public via infomercials might also help them realize the dangers as well? Doctors need to stand their ground and take back the ground they have lost over the years. Realize it is okay to tell a parent in a kind way, “I am the doctor this is what I know is best for your child or for you.”

It would be a good thing to cut back on the ability to get prescription drugs without a prescription. It is too easy to get on the computer and purchase drugs from overseas pharmacies. Make the penalty for doing this like the penalty for illegal substances. If enough people are punished they will decrease maybe. Some would have you believe the government does not control this problem as it is a way of population control, and if one is stupid enough to buy drugs without a prescription then the consequences are deserved. Ignorance is not an excuse. Although the conspiracy theorists are out there what is the truth? We may never know but as long as one does what they are supposed to there is no need to worry.

It seems the FDA is already aware of the use of antibacterial soaps as a problem and they seem to be already addressing it but not allowing big name companies to make the soaps if they are not going to work. This is a step in the right direction but a better control over the food side of things would be a good start in the right direction also. Regulation of antibiotics in animal products we use for food should be implemented also.
The author of this essay does not have the answers for sure but is totally intrigued by the items

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