Apple Case

In: Business and Management

Submitted By carlraybrook
Words 942
Pages 4
1) Apple has always had a mission to develop and sell easy to use products to consumers. Apple has always offered customers a complete solution- a plug and play type of system. They integrated hardware, software and peripherals into one unit instead of buying a computer, then software and audio packages individually. They also developed their products from scratch instead of using current software or technology and make modifications. They had unique drives, chips and displays. Apple made it affordable and easy. “At $2,495, the Macintosh was the first affordable computer to offer a graphical user interface, replacing fusty text-based operating systems with an intuitive layout of folders and icons.”(1).

2) Apple struggled with the PC's because it used only its own system and its own software. Other software developers could not write programs for Apple like the DOS system. This unique software operating system gave them a disadvantage because there was no opening for other people to work with it. Apple also had a struggle with PC’s in the late 1980’s and early 1990’s when there were many cheaper, enhanced PC’s available. Apple was forced to make more and more upgrades, each forced by the increased popularity of the lower-priced PC clones and the ever growing enhancements available in Microsoft’s Windows cheaper operating systems. However, because of Apple’s proprietary architecture-programs would always remain expensive and hard-to-come by. Only recently has Apple begun to open up and allow other companies to develop software for their systems or even allow other software to be compatible with their computers-a couple of examples of this would be Microsoft Office and Parallels for Mac.

3) PC’s will continue to be profitable as long as Apple allows other companies to write software for the systems or make the software compatible with their computers.…...

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