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Araby

In: English and Literature

Submitted By ghoiland
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Araby I always knew Christmas was close when I would hear my uncle complain that it got dark so early. As my Aunt fixed supper I would sit by my usual spot by my bedroom window and listen to the kids playing in the street. The Catholic school across the street had just let out and the street was full of the sounds of parents calling out and collecting their children. This was the most active our quiet dead end street would ever be. After all the children went home our block would settle down to just the kids that lived on our street. Next to us lived the Donavon family and they had a large family. There were 4 boys and one girl. They were friends with my cousins with whom I lived and they would always play outside our house. The girls name was Patricia and she had the most beautiful voice. Her words were soft and compassionate and when she spoke it seemed her words were aimed at me. As I listened to her from my window on this seemingly typical late afternoon I thought how it would be to join them and finally speak with Patricia. I slowly made my way down the creaky stairs and regrouped at the base of the stairs. I sat down on the bottom stair and leaned my head against the railing. It was so quiet and peaceful. I debated withy myself if I had the courage to go outside. Sometimes I was winning the debate and sometimes it seemed I was kidding myself. What I did know is the feeling of safety I had sitting all alone in the quiet and warm foyer of our home. I thought how wonderful it would be to talk with Patricia and hear her beautiful voice whispering her soft words into my ear. Outside I joined my cousins and they quickly brought me into their click of friends. They were playing a game of soccer but I sat on the curb and listened. I could hear a few of the boys talking about how beautiful Patricia was and I felt a jolt of jealously. Billy O’leary...

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