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Argument and Logic

In: Philosophy and Psychology

Submitted By lilmanger19
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Argument and Logic

Axia Campus of University of Phoenix

Parmenide’s most famous disciple, Zeno has devised a series of ingenious arguments to support Parmenide’s theory. The theory is reality is one. Zeno took a basic approach to demonstrate motion is impossible. His example was a rabbit moving from one hole to another, and must first reach the quarter point before reaching the next hole. The point needing to be reached is one-eighth the distance. Whether it is a rabbit or another creature it must reach a point of infinite number of points to get anywhere they wish to go. By the requirement of needing to move an infinite number of times anywhere would rule out motion. Second theory states for a rabbit to move from one hole to another, at each moment of its travel will occupy space meaning it is at rest. Since the rabbit occupies space each moment it is at rest each moment so it cannot move.

Zeno’s argument is that motion is not possible. Basically stating when a rabbit moves from one place to another the rabbit moves infinite times ruling out motion. When anything is attempting to reach a certain spot or location whether it is an animal or human we at any point can all stop. Zeno is saying motion does not exist at all because we all stop at some point. I believe him stating motion does not exist is Ludacris, because as we are moving we are in motion and then we stop and then we are back in motion once we began to move again. I believe for the most part his logics and arguments are fairly strong, but also weak. For instance when Zeno stated his arguments were to prove motion is possible. Motion is always possible because at some point again whether human or animal we are in motion within some point in our day when going from one place to another place. I do think Zeno made a great effort in the arguments for Parmenide. However I think the logic should have...

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