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Art of Dying

In: Historical Events

Submitted By jaybhi91
Words 367
Pages 2
Jay Butler
HIS 2800
Dr. Phipps
Precis: the Art of Dying

In “The Civil War Soldier and the Art of Dying,” Drew Gilpin Faust examines how the impact and meaning of the war’s death toll went beyond the numbers of Americans who died. Faust asserts that death’s significance for the Civil War generation changed dramatically from its previous prevailing assumptions about life’s proper end—about who should die, when and where, and under what circumstances (Faust, 4). Although mid-19th-century Americans endured a high rate of infant mortality, life expectancy ofmost individuals who had reached young adulthood survived into middle age. Yet, the Civil War took young, healthy men's lives rapidly, often instantly, and destroyed them with diseaseor injury. This marked a sharp and alarming departure from existing preconceptions about who should die. Both Civil War soldiers and civilians distinguished between what many referred to as “ordinary death,” as it had occurred in prewar years, from the manner and frequency of death in Civil War battlefields, hospitals, and camps, and from the war’s interruptions of civilian lives (Faust, 4).Laura2013-11-23T22:52:00Wordy and slightly confusing, consider rewording

The perception of how life should end says a great deal about how an individual values life. Faust uses this perspective as an analytical tool in her discussion of the changing preconceptions of the 'Good Death,' a notion of concern across religious and secular milieus. Laura2013-11-23T22:54:00Great sentence
Mid-19th-century America was overwhelmingly Protestant, and death was understood within the context of Christian faith in salvation and immortality (Faust, 8). Death acted as an equalizer among religions and spawned ecumenical relationships between Protestants, Catholics and Jews. A 'Good Death,' which ultimately defined the life that had preceded it and forecast the...

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