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Article Ii of the Uniform Commercial Code

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Article II of the Uniform Commercial Code
PA130- Contracts
Unit 9
Carolyn Padilla

Article II of the Uniform Commercial Code is for the sale of goods such as an automobile or a television.
A house would be ok except it involves the sale of land which is not covered by article 2, and it also does not cover a contract between you and a fee for service contract, such as wanting an addition put on your house for example. Generally to use this code all parties must act in good faith or this will not be recognized by the courts and you will not be protected by the UCC Article II. The contract must be fair and if not the court may find the contract “unconscionable” There is a broad scope for this is not extremely strict and is looked at on a case by case analysis. If the court finds that the contract is not fair it may void the contract altogether or enforce the contract taking out the unfair part of the contract. In most situations the merchant is the one who has to show it is a fair and “ unconscionable” contract. This specific article also includes the statute of frauds in which a sale of goods over $500 is involved. Here is example of Article II UCC enforceable contracts:
Summary of Lefkowitz v. Great Minneapolis Surplus Store, 251 Minn. 188, 86 N.W.2d 689 (1957). 1 Facts
Great Minneapolis Surplus Store (D) published advertisements in a newspaper for a sale on fur coats, mink scarves, and a lapin stole. Each of the advertisements indicated that the sale items would be sold on a first come first served basis, stated the quantities of each item available, and stated that they would be sold for one dollar each. Lefkowitz (P) was the first customer to present himself and offer the one dollar price per the terms of the advertisement. The defendant refused to sell the sale items to Lefkowitz and told him that according to the “house...

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