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Asian American Dream

In: Other Topics

Submitted By itsalan
Words 872
Pages 4
Alan Chen
ASAM 320
Asian American Dream
“Thus as individuals and as a people, in the home, on the job, in the classrooms, and on the street, we have had to make choices.”(Iijima 2) Choices that make the American Dream possible. Asian Americans attain the American Dream by examples in music, literature, visual arts, and graphic novels. Asian Americans have worked hard to succeed and have freedom without the government intervene. Three examples are “A Grain of Sand” music for the struggle by Asian in America, “Shortcomings” by Adrian Tomin, and music from Sudden Rush, “EA” and K-Pop, which explains Asian Americans obtain the American Dream.
American Dream is a set of ideals in which freedom includes the opportunity for prosperity and success, and an upward social mobility for the family and children, achieved through hard work in a society with few barriers. The term American Dream is used in many ways, but it is an idea that suggests that anyone in the United States can succeed through hard work and have the potential to lead a happy, successful life. Many people have expanded upon the definition to include things such as freedom, fulfillment and meaningful. The American dream is achieved through sacrifice, risk-taking and hard work, not by chance.
In “A Grain of Sand”, “You are the music You are the song You are the ones To whom the future belongs,” (Iijima – Miyatmoto 3) this shows the freedom that helps make you succeed in life and prosper. In the article, the poem, “Wandering Chinaman”, “I left my home and my parents at the age of twenty-one. In a family of eight…I arrived in this country in 1925.”(Chin 4) This part of the poem shows the risk taken to come to America to live the American Dream. “When I’d saved enough, and thought that I was done, then came a world war…I decided to marry, and sent away for a wife. I settle down to a family.”(Chin 4) In this...

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