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Assess the Feminist Views on the Role of Religion in Society Today

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Submitted By Mantas
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Assess the feminist views on the role of religion in society today
(18 marks: AO1: 6, AO2: 12)

This question is asking you to examine the strengths/limitations of feminism in comparison to other social theories. You will need to critically analyse and evaluate the following claims in your essay. * Feminist theorists argue that religion is a: Instrument of domination A product of patriarchy Serves the interest of men * Women are always unequal to men in terms of:
Institutions – leadership and hierarchy Representation – culture, in scriptures. Attitudes and beliefs - socialisation

Item A
Sociologists disagree about the role of religion in society. Functionalists, for example, see religion mainly as a positive force. However, Marxists see religion as a tool of capitalism. They argue that it acts to justify inequality, helping to keep the poor satisfied by giving them hope of better times to come and preventing social unrest and revolution.

Feminists see religion as a force for subordination and patriarchal oppression. This view is supported by evidence such as the differential treatment of women in religious congregations.

Other sociologists argue that such evidence is out of date and that women are no longer the victims of religious oppression.

Introduction
Briefly explain the feminist view of religion– negative – patriarchy – conservative force. Briefly compare to the Marxist view as it is similar. Feminists show us the negative elements of religion but fail to see the good elements as argued by FUNC, NR and NM.

Paragraph 1: FEMINISM vs FUNCTIONALISM
Point: religion is patriarchal.-Oppression, making them invisible, controlling what they ca nand cant wear, form of social control.Prevents them from being sexualised, liberates women.
Explain: concepts, key thinkers and examples
Armstrong – Social construction, decline of...

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