Premium Essay

Assess the View That Religion Has to Adapt to Society or It Will Die Out

In: Religion Topics

Submitted By danya123
Words 486
Pages 2
Religion has affected humans in society in many different ways, by rules, traditions and mortality. The most powerful and important role that religion has played within society is how it controlled the human mind for many centuries, brainwashing the people on what to believe and what not to believe, and that is one of the main reasons why religious organisations are changing the rules and trying to adapt to society to win the faith of the people back, as things like New Age Movements and Atheism, by no doubt are becoming much more popular than religion.
Durkheim argues that the popularity of religion in Britain and the USA in late 18th early 19th century was a reaction to anxieties created by industrialisation and urbanisation. This created social disruption, undermined value consensus and produced anomie, which is the feelings of moral confusion and uncertainty of the future. Such feelings led to the appearance of religious sects such as Mormonism and Jehovah’s witnesses. In a situation of change and uncertainty, people were most likely to lose their faith in religion, which may have led to secularisation, which comes back to the theory that religious organisations are now adapting to society in order for them not to die out.
Sociologists such as Durkheim, are interested in the relationship between religion and social change. Some approaches see religion as change inhibiting a conservative force in society, whilst others see religion as promoting social change. Durkheim believed that religion is a secondary agent of socialisation whose major function is to socialise society’s members into value consensus, which is a common agreement about values and the ways of behaving. We can assume that this may also be a reason on why religion is actually adapting to society, to tell people how to behave and what common values are acceptable, an example of this is that...

Similar Documents

Premium Essay

Sociology

...of sects. 1. They are short lived. Often the leader will die out and so the sect with it. 2. They are often led by a charismatic leader who tends to be the main attraction to the sect after advertising it in a way people would want to then come and join with that leader. 3. They require high levels of commitment to them. Once you are in a sect there is a rarely a chance to get out of it, your life changes in order to revolve around the sect. 02 Using material from Item A and elsewhere, assess the view that the growth of religious and fundamentalism is a reaction to globalisation. Globalisation is the idea that the world is getting smaller, through interconnectedness, different societies are becoming a lot closer to each other through technology and the media as well as transport. Fundamentalism, according to some sociologists is the challenge to globalisation, returning to the roots of their religion where the core beliefs are still in practice. Some people associate fundamentalism with violence, as was the case with the 9/11 attack, but this view has been criticised because not all fundamentalist groups use violent methods. Anthony Giddens argues that fundamentalism is in fact a reaction to globalisation because with globalisation comes cosmopolitan religion which then provides choice in many different areas of life and because there is choice there is uncertainty. Globalisation provides the necessary to adapt to a postmodern world, and then the fundamentalism is to......

Words: 1651 - Pages: 7

Premium Essay

Beliefs in Society

...SCLY 3: Beliefs in Society Revision Guide 2009-10 Name: Remember: You have to revise everything, because essay questions will focus on more than one area of the specification. The specification: The relationship between religious beliefs and social change and stability * Functionalism: conservative force, inhibition of change, collective conscience, Durkheim and totemism, anomie; civil religions * Marxism: religion as ideology, legitimating social inequality, disguising exploitation etc * Weber: religion as a force for social change: theodicies, the Protestant ethic * Neo-Marxism: religion used by those opposing the ruling class, liberation theology * Feminism: religious beliefs supporting patriarchy * Fundamentalist beliefs: rejecting change by reverting to supposed traditional values and practices. Religious organisations, including cults, sects, denominations, churches and New Age movements, and their relationship to religious and spiritual belief and practice * Typologies of religious organisations: churches, denominations, sects and cults, with examples of each New Religious Movements and typologies of NRMs eg world rejecting/accommodating/affirming; millenarian beliefs, with examples of each * New Age movements and spirituality, with examples * The relationship of these organisations to religious and spiritual belief and practice. The relationship between different social groups and religious/spiritual organisations and movements,......

Words: 23270 - Pages: 94

Premium Essay

Feminism and Ideology

...SCLY 3: Beliefs in Society Revision Guide 2009-10 Name: Remember: You have to revise everything, because essay questions will focus on more than one area of the specification. The specification: The relationship between religious beliefs and social change and stability * Functionalism: conservative force, inhibition of change, collective conscience, Durkheim and totemism, anomie; civil religions * Marxism: religion as ideology, legitimating social inequality, disguising exploitation etc * Weber: religion as a force for social change: theodicies, the Protestant ethic * Neo-Marxism: religion used by those opposing the ruling class, liberation theology * Feminism: religious beliefs supporting patriarchy * Fundamentalist beliefs: rejecting change by reverting to supposed traditional values and practices. Religious organisations, including cults, sects, denominations, churches and New Age movements, and their relationship to religious and spiritual belief and practice * Typologies of religious organisations: churches, denominations, sects and cults, with examples of each New Religious Movements and typologies of NRMs eg world rejecting/accommodating/affirming; millenarian beliefs, with examples of each * New Age movements and spirituality, with examples * The relationship of these organisations to religious and spiritual belief and practice. The relationship between different social groups and......

Words: 23270 - Pages: 94

Premium Essay

Feminism

...Feminism in Multicultural Societies An analysis of Dutch Multicultural and Postsecular Developments and their Implications for Feminist Debates Eva Midden A thesis submitted in partial fulfilment for the requirements of the degree of PhD at the University of Central Lancashire May 2010       Student Declaration Concurrent registration for two or more academic awards I declare that while registered as a candidate for the research degree, I have not been registered candidate or enrolled student for another award of the University or other academic or professional institution Material submitted for another award I declare that no material contained in the thesis has been used in any other submission for an academic award and is solely my own work Signature of Candidate Type of Award School ___PhD_________________________________ ___Centre for Professional Ethics___________ 1   Abstract It was long assumed that both multiculturalism and feminism are connected to progressive movements and hence have comparable and compatible goals. However, both in academia and in popular media the critique on multiculturalism has grown and is often accompanied with arguments related to gender equality and/or feminism. According to political scientist Susan Moller Okin for example there are fundamental conflicts between our commitment to gender equality and the desire to respect the customs of minority cultures or religions. If we agree that......

Words: 97145 - Pages: 389

Premium Essay

Edphod8

...# 2011 University of South Africa All rights reserved Printed and published by the University of South Africa Muckleneuk, Pretoria EDPHOD8/1/2012Ð2014 98753223 3B2 Karin-mod Style CONTENTS Learning unit PREFACE SECTION 1 A theoretical framework 1 The pastoral role of the educator in South African public schools: a theoretical framework SECTION 2 Practical examples 2 Understanding cultural diversity in my public school classroom 3 The ABC of building schools for an integrated South African society Ð diverse people unite 4 Education for human rights and inclusivity 5 Child abuse: an educator's guide for the Senior Phase and FET 6 HIV/AIDS education at school 7 Educators' pastoral role in their schools and communities: an opportunity to care SECTION 3 Crisis and trauma in adolescence 8 Crisis: the theory 9 The crisis intervener and the person in crisis: prevention, prejudice and the intervener 10 Crisis intervention: general models 11 The skills for ensuring a positive relationship and interview between the crisis intervener and the adolescent in crisis SECTION 4 The religious world of the learner 12 Understanding religious diversity in my school 186 122 136 144 168 16 24 41 57 81 92 Page (iv) 2 EDPHOD8/1/2012±2014 (iii) PREFACE The study material for this module comprises four sections. Section 1: The theoretical framework for the pastoral role of the educator (see learning unit 1) Section 2: Practical examples to illustrate the applied competence of the......

Words: 100366 - Pages: 402

Premium Essay

Gender Affecting Academic Performance

...SCHOOL SATISFACTION AND ACADEMIC PERFORMANCE OF SELECTGRADE 8 LOWER SECTION STUDENTS IN SAN BARTOLOME NATIONAL HIGH SCHOOL SAN PABLO CITY, LAGUNA An Undergraduate Thesis Presented to the Faculty of College of Arts and Sciences Laguna State Polytechnic University San Pablo City Campus San Pablo City In Partial Fulfillment Of the Requirements for the Degree Bachelor of Science in Psychology STELLA MAE OBIASCA ROSE AN DIANGKINAY October 2015 Chapter I THE PROBLEM AND ITS BACKGROUND Introduction In this era of globalization education is considered as a first step for every human activity. It plays a vital role in development of human capital and is linked with an individual well-being and opportunities for better living. It ensures the acquisition of knowledge and skills that enable individuals to increase their productivity and improve their quality of life. The researchers are very aware of the difficulties experienced by the lower section students. The seriousness involved as it affects the student’s education through him or her not being able to fully concentrate in order to comprehend lessons. Some of the public schools do not have proper facilities especially who belongs to the lower section class. Some of them are not fully focusing on their study. Educators were faced today with a growing challenge of maintaining the nation education facilities. At the......

Words: 12634 - Pages: 51

Premium Essay

Case Study

...her rent-controlled apartment in New York City. She has lived in the United States for almost 40 years and speaks some English, albeit somewhat hesitantly. Her primary language is Spanish. Although she is now retired, for years Gabriela worked in a factory where she was exposed to a variety of industrial chemicals now considered toxic. Gabriela's husband died four years ago of a massive heart attack. She has six adult children, three of whom now live out of state. Gabriela is a devoted mother, calling her children as often as she can afford and even sending them homemade sweets. She raised her children through their teenage years in the same apartment in which she lives today. She is loath to leave it, although she now pays the rent only with great difficulty and substantial financial help from her children. Gabriela has long suffered from high blood pressure, which she controls with medication. She also has type-2 diabetes. When she was originally diagnosed with diabetes, she met once with a nurse who advised her on diet, exercise, and weight control, but Gabriela has found it difficult to adapt her traditional tastes in food and her lifestyle to the recommendations the nurse offered. Subsequently, Gabriela's doctor prescribed medication to help keep her diabetes under control. She tries to take her medication whenever she can remember and when she can afford it. Recently, tests have revealed that her kidney function has been declining. Gabriela's youngest son, Marcos, 49...

Words: 6862 - Pages: 28

Premium Essay

Worldview

...worldviews Religion true and false . . . . . . . . .. . . . 1 16 30 The problem of dualism and synthesis in Christianity Major themes in a worldview: Human nature, truth, meaning, purpose . 46 Scripture as the source of a Christian worldview The contours of a Biblical worldview . . . . . . .. . . . . . 59 70 87 104 119 136 157 Structure and direction. Sin and evil. Common grace The task and calling of humankind: to care for the creation . The nature of Christian community. A Christian view of society. The Kingdom of God: God's righteous rule over the whole creation . Bibliography . . . . . . . . ii Introduction The creation of the Father, fallen in sin, is redeemed by the death of the Son of God and is being transformed by the Holy Spirit into the kingdom of God. Herman Bavinck This series of studies is designed to provide a basic introduction to a distinctively Christian worldview that seeks to see the whole gospel applied to the whole of life. This Christian worldview makes a difference, because it is significant for our life in the world. It shapes and directs our lives in important ways, because it is the framework of our most basic beliefs about everything. These studies provide an initial introduction to the idea that Christianity provides a coherent, robust and significant basis for life that is a distinctive and genuine alternative to the prevailing worldviews which currently shape our society. No doubt there will be many questions arising......

Words: 42727 - Pages: 171

Free Essay

Chapter 1 Human Geo Notes

...Chapter 1 - Geography Matters: Definitions: * Human geography the study of the spatial organization of human activity and of people’s relationships with their environments * Cartography: the body of practical and theoretical knowledge about making distinctive visual representations of Earth’s surface in the form of maps * Map projection: a systematic rendering on a flat surface of the geographic coordinates of the features found on Earth’s surface * Ethnocentrism: the attitude that a persona’s own race and culture are superior to those of others * Imperialism: the extension of the power of a nation through direct/indirect control of the economic and political life of other territories * Masculinism: the assumption that the world is and should be shaped mainly by men for men * environmental determinism: a doctrine holding that human activities are controlled by the environment * globalization: the increasing interconnectedness of different parts of the world through common processes of economic, environmental political and cultural change * ecumene: the total habitable area of a country. Sine it depends on the prevailing technology, the available ecumene varies over time. Canada’s ecumene is so much less than its total area. * Geodemographic research: investigation using census data and commercial data (i.e. sales data and property records) about populations of small districts to create profiles of those populations for market......

Words: 24912 - Pages: 100

Premium Essay

Sociology

... |failed to the Secondary Modern School. This exam still exists in some counties such as | | |Kent and also in Northern Ireland. | |12-Plus Exam |Exam made available only to a minority of 'high-flyers' in Secondary Modern schools, | | |offering a late chance to go to Grammar School at the age of 12. | |'30-30-40 society' |A term associated with Will Hutton to describe an increasingly insecure and polarised | | |society. The bottom 30 per cent is socially excluded by poverty from the rest of society.| | |The next 30 per cent live in fear and insecurity of falling into poverty. Only the top 40| | |per cent feel secure and confident. | A |abortion |The 1967 Abortion Act permitted termination of pregnancy by a registered practitioner | | |subject to certain conditions and was introduced in 1968. Currently around one-third of ......

Words: 22530 - Pages: 91

Premium Essay

Politics, Theology

...POLITICS, THEOLOGY AND HISTORY RAYMOND PLANT CAMBRIDGE UNIVERSITY PRESS Politics, Theology and History is a major new book by a prominent academic and an active politician. It ranges widely across the disciplines of theology, political theory and philosophy and poses acute questions about the basic moral foundations of liberal societies. Lord Plant focuses on the role that religious belief can and ought to play in argument about public policy in a pluralistic society. He examines the potential political implications of Christian belief and the ways in which it may be deployed in political debate. The book is a contribution to the modern debate about the moral pluralism of western liberal societies, discussing the place of religious belief in the formation of policy and asking what sorts of issues in modern society might be the legitimate objects of a Christian social and political concern. Raymond Plant has written an important study of the relationship between religion and politics which will be of value to students, academics, politicians, church professionals, policy makers and all concerned with the moral fabric of contemporary life. r ay m on d pl an t is Professor of European Political Thought at the University of Southampton and a Member of the House of Lords. He was a Home affairs spokesperson for the Labour Party from 1992 to 1996, and Master of St Catherine's College, Oxford, from 1994 to 2000. Lord Plant's main publications are Social and Moral Theory in......

Words: 144283 - Pages: 578

Premium Essay

Concept Analysis on House Bill 5043

...Introduction Reproductive life planning includes all the decision an individual or couple make about having children (2007, Pillitteri). It is important for the health of children that as many pregnancies as possible be intended, because when a pregnancy is unintended, the mother is less likely to seek prenatal check, less likely to breast feed and less careful to protect the fetus from harmful substances. An individual’s or a couple’s choice of contraceptive method should be made carefully, with complete knowledge about advantages, disadvantages, and side effects of the various options. Important things to consider include the following: * Personal values * Ability to use a method correctly * How the method will affect sexual enjoyment * Financial factors * Status of a couple’s relationship * Prior experiences * Future plans The widespread use of contraceptives points to both an increased awareness of responsibility for contraception and options available. Understanding this concept, its work and how they compare in terms of benefits and disadvantages is necessary for successful counseling. Legal and ethical issues must also be considered when counseling clients. The arguments about contraception fall into several groups: * philosophical arguments such as the "natural law" argument * arguments based on different ideas of marriage, sex and the family * human rights arguments such as * 'procreative liberty' * a woman's......

Words: 15541 - Pages: 63

Premium Essay

Prospect& Limitation of Microcredit

...A Report on the Prospects and limitation of microfinance institutions in Indian farming sector Submitted to: Mr. Anup Singh (C.E.O.) Sonata Finance Private Limited 1/1 A, Rai Bahadur Ram, Charan Das Road Balrampur house, Allahabad (UP) -211002 Submitted by: Vinay Kumar Mishra MBA-Rural Development 3rd semester Govind Ballabh Pant Social Science Institute, Allahabad (A constituent Institute of University of Allahabad) Contents1 Topic name Page no. Acknowledgement 3 Executive Summary 4 Introduction 5-6 Literature Review 7-12 Objective of the study 13 About the organization 14-19 Research methodology 20 Questioner used for survey 21-25 Findings 26-31 Case studies 32-33 Conclusion 34-35 Suggestions 36-37 Summary 38 Acknowledgement 2 This evaluation study is a humble effort to understand the concept of Joint liability Group in Micro Finance Institution. The study would not have been completes without the priceless support of those involved in the study. It was essentially programme to find Prospective and limitation of microfinance institution in Indian farming sector. First, I would like to express my deepest gratitude to Mr.Anup Singh of Sonata Finance Private Limited (Allahabad) for their continual involvement in our work. I extend my highest indebtedness to Mr. Ashish Kumar Area manager. I am also thankful to other staff member of Sonata Finance Private Limited for support whenever we needed it. I...

Words: 7963 - Pages: 32

Premium Essay

Bdhs

...assistance in editing this volume and to Geoff Hunter for translating the first German version of parts of the Introduction; Smelser has profited from the research assistance and critical analyses given by Joppke. 1. Social Change and Modernity Those who organized the conference on which this volume is based—including the editors— decided to use the terms "social change" and "modernity" as the organizing concepts for this project. Because these terms enjoy wide usage in contemporary sociology and are general and inclusive, they seem preferable to more specific terms such as "evolution" "progress," "differentiation," or even "development," many of which evoke more specific mechanisms, processes, and directions of change. Likewise, we have excluded historically specific terms such as "late capitalism" and "industrial society" even though these concepts figure prominently in many of the contributions to this volume. The conference strategy called for a general statement of a metaframework for the study of social change within which a variety of more specific theories could be identified. 2. Theories of Social Change Change is such an evident feature of social reality that any social-scientific theory, whatever its conceptual starting point, must sooner or later address it. At the same time it is essential to note that the ways social change has been identified have varied greatly in the history of thought. Furthermore, conceptions of change appear to have mirrored the......

Words: 171529 - Pages: 687

Premium Essay

Religion, Fundamentalism and Ethnicity Global Perspective

...permission of the Institute of Policy Studies. Copy editor: Belinda Hill Cover design: Milne Printers Ltd Printed by Milne Printers Ltd Contents List of Tables iv List of Figures iv List of Boxes iv Foreword v Acknowledgments and Disclaimer ix Part One: Introduction and Context of Inquiry 1 Introduction 2 New Zealand Context 3 21 Part Two: Communitarian Responses to Liberalism Introduction to Part Two 61 3 Civic Republicanism: Michael Sandel 63 4 The Politics of Recognition: Charles Taylor 83 Part Three: Multiculturalism Introduction to Part Three 105 5 Multicultural Citizenship: Will Kymlicka 107 6 Common Citizenship in a Multicultural Society: Bhikhu Parekh 151 Part Four: Critical Responses to Multiculturalism Introduction to Part Four 187 7 A Politics of Difference: Iris Marion Young 189 8 Against White Paranoid Nationalism: Ghassan Hage 223 9 Egalitarian Liberalism: Brian Barry 243 Part Five: Concluding Reflections 10 Diversity, Democracy, Justice 271 Afterword 306 References 307 Index of Names 335 iii Tables 1 Levy’s typology...

Words: 135228 - Pages: 541