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Atwood's Machine Lab

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Submitted By fuadhossain1998
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Atwood’s Machine

Preliminary Questions

1. I expect zero motion to occur. The acceleration equation for both masses is Fnet = mg, this is due to the fact that both masses are at a certain height above the ground. Since g is a constant of 9.8m/s2 [down] and m is the same for both masses, the Fnet for both masses is equivalent. The forces of each mass pushing down cancel out each other, resulting in zero acceleration (zero motion).

2. a. Acceleration would increase, this would be due to the fact that there is now a difference in the value of m in the Fnet = mg equation for both masses (Fnet1>F. This would result in one side pushing down and the other pushing up, causing acceleration.

b. Acceleration would be zero. Since g is a constant of 9.8m/s2 [down] and m is the same for both masses, the Fnet for both masses is equivalent. Gradually increasing the mass of both sides results in the forces of each mass (pushing down) cancelling each other out, resulting in zero acceleration (zero motion).

3. Refer to question 1 for answer; due to both masses having the same m value and the same g constant the forces (Fnet = ma) pulling down on each mass cancel each other out.

4. Hand-drawn Diagram

Analysis Questions

1.

i. a ∝ mT1.221 ii. a ∝ Δm-1.093

2. a ∝ mT1.221 Δm-1.093

3. Hand-drawn Diagrams + Solution

4.

My values for theoretical acceleration (calculated above) are different from the values of acceleration that I obtained from my experiment due to: human error (not setting up the experiment properly, pressing the collect/stop button too early/too late etc.) and not accounting for the friction in the pulley system.

Sample Calculation

5. The tension in the string does not change as the system accelerates because it does not…...

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