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Augustine

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Auguste Comte grew up in the wake of the French Revolution. He rejected religion and royalty, focusing on sociology. He broke the subject into two categories: the forces holding society together ("social statics") and those driving social change ("social dynamics"). Comte's ideas and use of scientific methods greatly advanced the field of sociology
Isidore Auguste Marie François Xavier Comte, better known as August Comte was born on January 19, 1798 in Montpellier, France. He was the son of Louis Comte, a government tax official and his mother Rosalie (Boyer) Comte. Both of Comte’s parents were monarchists and devout Roman Catholics.
Born in the shadow of the French Revolution, modern science and technology gave birth to the Industrial Revolution. During this time, European society experienced violent conflict and feelings of alienation. Confidence in established beliefs and institutions was shattered. Auguste Comte spent much of his life developing a philosophy for a new social order amidst all the chaos and uncertainty.
While attending the University of Montpellier, Comte abandoned these attitudes in favor of republicanism inspired by the French Revolution, which would influence his later work. His brilliance as a mathematician and scientist were proven when he entered Ecole Polytechnique in 1814. He left school before graduating and settled in Paris with no viable way to support himself. He earned a meager living teaching mathematics and journalism while deep in the study of economics, history and philosophy.
At 19, Comte met Henri de Saint-Simon, a social theorist interested in utopian reform and an early founder of European socialism. Deeply influenced by Saint-Simon, Comte became his secretary and collaborator. In 1824, the partnership ended over disputed authorship of the pair’s writings, but Saint-Simon’s influence remained throughout Comte’s life. In...

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