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Avatar as an Allegory

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Avatar as an Allegory
HUM3321-14
Sean Gilman

Avatar as an Allegory
HUM3321-14
Sean Gilman

Sean Gilman
Jeffrey Bennett
HUM3321-14
13 December 2011
Avatar as an Allegory
In the 1600s and 1700s, the British began to migrate to and colonize “The New World”, America. As they arrived, they met a society for whom they displayed little compassion and much hostility. The British invaded their land and oppressed the Native American people for hundreds of years due to their cultural differences and lack of understanding. James Cameron’s 2009 film, Avatar mirrors the discovery of the new world, albeit in a very different light. The American military colonizes and destroys land on Pandora, while showing no regard for the welfare of the Na’vi. Avatar serves as an allegory for warfare and cultural hatred based on ignorance and a lack of multi-cultural acceptance and understanding.
The Na’vi society of Pandora is an extremely naturalistic people. The Na’vi are the dominant species of Pandora, much like humans on Earth. They are a humanoid species that very much believes in the spirituality of nature and the world around them. In Na’vi society, there are marriage parallels, and they believe in an all-knowing God figure. This is itself, is a very strong correlation to the Native American cultures of early North America. Many of those cultures had similar beliefs. A lot of these Native American cultures believed in a strong connection between the physical world and the spiritual world, just like the Na’vi and their connection with the “Tree of Souls”. This seems to be a very obvious and intentional symbolization of the Na’vi people and a huge foreshadowing of the persecution they would endure, much like most Native American tribes.
On the other hand, the American military force that forces there way upon Pandora and into Na’vi territory is almost the complete...

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